Q:

What are examples of heroic couplets?

A:

Quick Answer

Examples of heroic couplets can be found in "Canterbury Tales" and "Legend of Good Women" by Geoffrey Chaucer and "Cooper's Hill" by John Denham. Heroic couplets are defined by rhyming lines written in a sequence, and they are commonly found in narrative and epic forms of traditional English poetry.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

An example of a heroic couplet from the General Prologue of "Canterbury Tales" is, "Whan that aprill with his shoures soote / The droghte of march hath perced to the roote." Another example of a heroic couplet from "Cooper's Hill" is, "O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream / My great example, as it is my theme."

Learn more about Literature

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is "The Pardoner's Tale" about?

    A:

    "The Pardoner's Tale" from Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" tells a moral tale against the sins of gluttony, blaspheming, drinking and gambling in which three young men die because of their greed. The Pardoner's overriding theme is that greed is the root of all evil.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who was the Sergeant at Law in "The Canterbury Tales"?

    A:

    The Sergeant at Law, also known as the Man of Law, is the narrator of the fifth tale of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales." The Sergeant at Law is a medieval lawyer and judge described as being thorough in that no errors can be found in his legal writings.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who was the Wife of Bath?

    A:

    The Wife of Bath is one of the 29 pilgrims in Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales." In her prologue, readers learn of her five marriages and her twisted ways of justifying her lifestyle. She tells of how she won the men's hearts and admits her best husbands were rich.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does the Miller in "The Canterbury Tales" do?

    A:

    In Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," the Miller is a wrestling champion that can break doors open with his head. His image is one of a lower-class individual of the medieval times that likens to the "all brawn and no brains" stereotype.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore