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What are examples of assonance in The Raven?

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Assonance occurs in the poem ‘The Raven’ by Edgar Allen Poe in several lines, including "while I pondered weak and weary." Assonance is the repetition of vowels (a, e, I, o, u and sometimes y) in poems; in the passage cited, the repetition of the vowels "ea" in the words "weak" and "weary" is assonance. In addition to repetition in vowels, assonance also consists of repetition in sounds, such as long vowel sounds or short sounds.

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What are examples of assonance in The Raven?
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Assonance describes certain traits and characteristics of poems, as do other literary tools such as consonance and alliteration. Alliteration is similar to assonance, but refers to similar sounds found at the beginning of words, while assonance describes rhymes and patterns found in all parts of words. Examples of alliteration include the repetition of the consonants and their sounds in words such as "twinkling, twilight and twin"; in these words, the consonants "tw" form the same sound. Consonance refers to the repetition of consonants in poems, and like assonance, occurs throughout all parts of words and sentences. In addition to "weak" and "weary," assonance occurs in The Raven in the line "over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore." In that passage, the vowel "o" repeats in "over" "forgotten" and "lore," giving a long vowel sound.

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    What are examples of poems with repetition?

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    Some examples of poems with repetition are Edgar Allen Poe's "The Bells" and "War is Kind" by Stephen Crane. A single word, whole lines or stanzas, or the beginning and ending words are repeated throughout each poem.

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    What is the tone of Edgar Allen Poe's poem "The Raven"?

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    Edgar Allen Poe's famous poem "The Raven" has a melancholic tone. This derives from its topic, which is death, and the mournful language of the speaker, who is a lonely man left without his beautiful lover. The speaker's obsessive thoughts about his departed lover are also reflected in the repetition used throughout the text.

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    What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

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    The main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven" are undying devotion, loss and the lingering grief that cannot be diminished. The poem's narrator, a young man and presumably a student, is mourning the death of his lover, Lenore. Despite his attempts to lessen his grief through his studies and his pondering "many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore," he is wrenched back to his sorrow by a talking raven who repeatedly utters the famous refrain "nevermore," a painful reference to the fact that the narrator will never again be reunited with his beloved Lenore.

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  • Q:

    What are some examples of consonance within the poem "The Raven?"

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    Some examples of consonance within "The Raven" include "weak," and "weary," and "nodded," "nearly" and "napping." Consonance is defined as the repetition of consonant sounds either within the lines of a poem, or at the end of a line.

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