Q:

What is an example of hyperbole in "Romeo and Juliet"?

A:

Quick Answer

William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is filled with examples of hyperbole, such as when Romeo says that "[t]he brightness of [Juliet's] cheek would shame those stars, / As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven / Would through the airy region stream so bright / That birds would sing and think it were not night" (Act 2). This statement is hyperbolic because Juliet is not literally shining like the sun, and her eyes do not actually cause the birds to think that it is daytime.

Continue Reading
What is an example of hyperbole in "Romeo and Juliet"?
Credit: 20th Century Fox Moviepix Getty Images

Full Answer

Romeo tends toward hyperbole in general, as one might expect of a teenager in love. For example, he later says, "[t]here is no world without Verona walls, / But purgatory, torture, hell itself" (Act 3). He claims his life outside Verona is literally hell, but he is not actually screaming in an agony for eternity.

Learn more about Plays

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where does apostrophe occur in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    The most well-known apostrophe in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" occurs in Act 2 Scene 2, in which Juliet asks the absent Romeo, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" Because an apostrophe can be defined as any time a character speaks to a personified idea or anyone who is not present, there are several apostrophes in the play.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the history behind "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    "Romeo and Juliet" is arguably the most well-known work of William Shakespeare. It has graced many stages, classrooms and movie sets, but despite its vast popularity, the original play was met with mixed reviews. Nonetheless, it has one of the most rich and interesting histories in literature as of 2015.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why is "Romeo and Juliet" a tragedy?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is generally regarded as a tragedy because it features dramatic and devastating events when the two main protagonists die at the end. It doesn't, however, fit the conventional mode of Greek tragedies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where is a simile used in Act 4 of "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    A simile is used in Act 4, Scene 3, Line 39 of "Romeo and Juliet," when Juliet is describing her fear of waking up in the burial vault and compares it to "the horrible conceit of death and night." Juliet goes on to use another simile on line 49, fearing the "shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore