Q:

Why did Thomas Paine write "The Crisis?"

A:

Quick Answer

Thomas Paine wrote a series of articles known collectively as "The Crisis" to support his argument for independence from England during the Revolutionary War. Although he was born and raised in England, Paine was a staunch proponent of the movement to found a new government in the New World.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

According to the Library of Congress, Paine authored the first of his "Crisis" essays in 1776. He established a pattern of demanding freedom for all human beings, regardless of class or wealth. He repeatedly said and wrote that what mattered most in the world was what was in men's minds and hearts.

The History Channel indicates that Gen. George Washington found Paine's first essay so inspiring that he ordered it read to the troops at Valley Forge.

According to the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, Paine was involved in the American Revolution prior to this, having written a number of patriotic pieces for "Pennsylvania Magazine," of which he was also the editor. In addition to lending the revolution movement his writing talents, he served in Washington's army and contributed his own funds to the war effort. In keeping with his liberty theme over the years he also wrote arguments for abolishing slavery.

Learn more about Classics

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What did Thomas Paine argue in "Common Sense?"

    A:

    In "Common Sense," a pamphlet published anonymously at the outset of the American Revolutionary War, Thomas Paine argued for the need for the independence of the American colonies from Great Britain. In the beginning, he wrote about general theories of government, focusing then on the specific situation in the colonies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How would Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" be summarized?

    A:

    Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," published on January 10, 1776, was an effective and convincing summary of the many reasons why the American colonies should not be controlled by a despotic ruler, King George III, from an island across the sea. In addition to the political and logistical argument against overseas rule of the American colonies, Paine outlined compelling reasons for the creation of a new form of government in America, one based on Republicanism and elected officials, rather than on a parliamentary monarchy. Although his was not the first argument for the new Republican form of government, Paine's "Common Sense" was an incendiary work that stood behind the colonists' commitment to wage war against the English crown in pursuit of their independence.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the main idea of "The Crisis" by Thomas Paine?

    A:

    "The Crisis" by Thomas Paine focuses on the concept of establishing a sovereign American nation free of British tyranny. Printed at the turn of the Revolutionary War, this collection of articles contended that the British wanted to express powers reserved only for God and that it was the duty of all colonists to stand against their oppressors. It is also referred to as "The American Crisis."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the "American Crisis" by Thomas Paine?

    A:

    "The American Crisis" by Thomas Paine is a series of papers published to generate support for the American Revolution in the months preceding and throughout the American Revolutionary War. The primary theme of the papers is the injustice of England exercising absolute power over the colonists. Unlike many American philosophers and intellectual leaders of the time, Paine wrote to the common citizens and not just the wealthy elite.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore