Definitions

wolves

wolf spider

Name that originally referred to a species of southern European spider (Lycosa tarentula) but now refers to more than 175 spider species (family Lycosidae) found in North America, Europe, and north of the Arctic Circle. The body of L. tarentula, the largest species, is about 1 in. (2.5 cm) long. Most species have a long, broad, hairy brown body; stout, long legs; and strong, prominent jaws. Wolf spiders chase and pounce upon their prey, hunting mostly at night. Most species build a silk-lined, tubular nest in the ground, which they dig with their heavy front legs. A few species spin webs. The bite of L. tarentula produces no ill effects in humans.

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Any of three extant species of canine. The gray, or timber, wolf (Canis lupus) is the ancestor of all domestic dogs. It once had the largest distribution of any mammal except human beings, but it is now found primarily in Canada, Alaska, the Balkans, and Russia. Wolves are intelligent and social. Their primary prey are deer, moose, and caribou, though they feed on many smaller animals as well. Because wolves have killed livestock, they have been persecuted by farmers and ranchers. A male gray wolf may be 7 ft (2 m) long and weigh up to 175 lb (80 kg); it is the largest living wild canid. Gray wolves live in hierarchical packs whose territories cover at least 38 sq mi (100 sq km) and hunt mostly at night. The much smaller red wolf (C. rufus), once widespread in the south-central U.S., has been bred in captivity and reintroduced. The Abyssinian wolf (C. simensis) of Ethiopia was formerly considered a jackal. Seealso dire wolf.

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Extinct wolf (Canis dirus) that existed during the Pleistocene Epoch (1.8 million–10,000 years ago), probably the most common mammalian species found preserved in the La Brea Tar Pits. It differed from the modern wolf in being larger and having a more massive skull, a smaller brain (and probably less intelligence), and relatively light limbs. The species was considerably widespread; skeletal remains have been found in Florida and the Mississippi valley in the U.S., as well as in the Valley of Mexico.

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(born March 13, 1860, Windischgraz, Austria—died Feb. 22, 1903, Vienna) Austrian composer. He entered the Vienna Conservatory at age 15, but, as a rabid Wagnerian, he lost patience with his teachers' conservatism and soon left. By age 18 he probably had contracted the syphilis that would make him mentally unstable and eventually kill him. His volatile personality made it difficult for him to keep private students. As a critic (1884–87), he attracted attention for his vituperative comments. His productivity came in bursts; in 1888–89 he produced the remarkable songs of the Mörike Lieder, the Eichendorff Lieder, the Goethe Lieder, and much of the Spanish Songbook—more than half his total output. After beginning the Italian Songbook in 1891, he wrote nothing for three years, then quickly composed the opera Der Corregidor (1896) and finished the Italian Songbook (1896). In 1897 he suffered a complete breakdown, and he thereafter lived largely in an asylum.

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orig. Christa Ihlenfeld

(born March 18, 1929, Landsberg an der Warthe, Ger.) German novelist, essayist, and screenwriter. She was reared in a middle-class, pro-Nazi family; after Germany's defeat in 1945, she moved with her family to East Germany. Her work reflects her experiences during World War II and her postwar life in a communist state. Her novels include Divided Heaven (1963), which brought her political favour; The Quest for Christa T. (1968), severely attacked in East Germany; A Model Childhood (1976); Cassandra (1983), her most widely read book, linking nuclear and patriarchal power; and What Remains (1990), on government surveillance and her own links to the East German secret police.

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(born March 13, 1860, Windischgraz, Austria—died Feb. 22, 1903, Vienna) Austrian composer. He entered the Vienna Conservatory at age 15, but, as a rabid Wagnerian, he lost patience with his teachers' conservatism and soon left. By age 18 he probably had contracted the syphilis that would make him mentally unstable and eventually kill him. His volatile personality made it difficult for him to keep private students. As a critic (1884–87), he attracted attention for his vituperative comments. His productivity came in bursts; in 1888–89 he produced the remarkable songs of the Mörike Lieder, the Eichendorff Lieder, the Goethe Lieder, and much of the Spanish Songbook—more than half his total output. After beginning the Italian Songbook in 1891, he wrote nothing for three years, then quickly composed the opera Der Corregidor (1896) and finished the Italian Songbook (1896). In 1897 he suffered a complete breakdown, and he thereafter lived largely in an asylum.

Learn more about Wolf, Hugo (Filipp Jakob) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Christa Ihlenfeld

(born March 18, 1929, Landsberg an der Warthe, Ger.) German novelist, essayist, and screenwriter. She was reared in a middle-class, pro-Nazi family; after Germany's defeat in 1945, she moved with her family to East Germany. Her work reflects her experiences during World War II and her postwar life in a communist state. Her novels include Divided Heaven (1963), which brought her political favour; The Quest for Christa T. (1968), severely attacked in East Germany; A Model Childhood (1976); Cassandra (1983), her most widely read book, linking nuclear and patriarchal power; and What Remains (1990), on government surveillance and her own links to the East German secret police.

Learn more about Wolf, Christa with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Wolves, Witches and Giants was a cartoon based on a book of the same name, narrated by Spike Milligan. It included retellings of traditional fairy tales, which were fiction.

It included such remakes of tales such as Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty, Hansel and Gretel, Cinderella, and The Three Billy Goats Gruff.

It was made by the same producers that made Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids.

Although being based in Medieval times, it has featured some modern equipment, such as the Big Bad Wolf driving a blue sports car, a tailor playing on a games console, a grandmother watching a TV in her bed, or the Wicked Witch using a microwave.

Wolves, Witches and Giants is now being repeated on the CITV Channel.

External links

The Toonhound Website

References

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