United_States_House_of_Representatives_elections,_2008

United States House of Representatives elections, 2008

{{Infobox Election | election_name = United States House of Representatives elections, 2008 | country = United States | type = legislative | ongoing = yes | previous_election = United States House of Representatives elections, 2006 | previous_year = 2006 | previous_mps = United States House of Representatives elections, 2006 - complete list | next_election = United States House of Representatives elections, 2010 | next_year = 2010 | seats_for_election = All 435 seats to the United States House of Representatives | election_date = November 4 2008 | image1 = | leader1 = Nancy Pelosi | party1 = Democratic Party (United States) | leaders_seat1 = California-8th | last_election1 = 233 seats, 53.6% | seats1 = | seat_change1 = | popular_vote1 = | percentage1 = | swing1 = | image2 = | leader2 = John Boehner | party2 = Republican Party (United States) | leaders_seat2 = Ohio-8th | last_election2 = 202 seats, 46.4% | seats_needed2 = 16 | seats2 = | seat_change2 = | popular_vote2 = | percentage2 = | swing2 = | map_image = | map_size = | map_caption = | title = Speaker | before_election = Nancy Pelosi | before_colour = | after_election = | after_colour = | before_party = Democratic Party (United States) | after_party = | map_image = 2008 US House races.svg | map_size = 350px | map_caption = House Seats up for election:
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''This article discusses contested races. For a complete list of all seats, see United States House of Representatives elections, 2008 - complete list

The 2008 U.S. House of Representatives elections will be held on November 4, 2008, to elect members to the United States House of Representatives to serve in the 111th United States Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011. All 435 seats are up for election. Democrats, who regained a majority in the 2006 elections hope to retain or expand their control of Congress. Although it is very unlikely at this point, the Republicans hope to regain the majority it lost in the 2006 elections or at least add to their numbers. Turnout likely will be increased due to the 2008 presidential election. The presidential election, 2008 Senate elections, and 2008 state gubernatorial elections, as well as many other state and local elections, will occur on the same date.

Composition going into the elections

The House currently has 235 Democrats, 199 Republicans and one vacancy.

Special elections in 2008 for the 110th Congress

Completed special elections

Retiring Incumbents

Thirty-two incumbents are voluntarily retiring from the House.

Democratic incumbents

  1. : Bud Cramer: "[T]o spend more time with my family and begin another chapter in my life
  2. : Mark Udall: To run for U.S. Senate
  3. : Tom Allen: To run for U.S. Senate
  4. : Tom Udall: To run for U.S. Senate
  5. : Michael McNulty: "[I]t's not what I want to do for the rest of my life.
  6. : Darlene Hooley: Because of the "cumulative effect of arduous travel, the relentless demands of fund-raising and 32 years of public service

Republican incumbents

  1. : Terry Everett: Because of age and health
  2. : Rick Renzi: To fight federal criminal charges involving a land-swap deal
  3. : John Doolittle: To fight an FBI corruption investigation
  4. : Duncan Hunter: To run for President (dropped out)
  5. : Tom Tancredo: To run for President (dropped out)
  6. : Dave Weldon: To return to his medical practice
  7. : Jerry Weller: To spend more time with his family, amid questions about his Nicaraguan land dealings, his wife's investments, and his relationship to an indicted defense contractor
  8. : Ray LaHood
  9. : Ron Lewis
  10. : Jim McCrery
  11. : Jim Ramstad
  12. : Chip Pickering
  13. : Kenny Hulshof: To run for Governor
  14. : Jim Saxton: Because of age and health
  15. : Mike Ferguson: To spend more time with his family
  16. : Heather Wilson: To run for U.S. Senate (lost the primary to 2nd District Congressman Steve Pearce)
  17. : Steve Pearce: To run for U.S. Senate
  18. : Vito Fossella: Amid scandal following a drunk driving arrest which led to revelations of infidelity and a secret family he maintained in Virginia
  19. : Jim Walsh
  20. : Tom Reynolds
  21. : Dave Hobson
  22. : Deborah Pryce
  23. : Ralph Regula
  24. : John Peterson: To spend more time with his family
  25. : Tom Davis
  26. : Barbara Cubin

Vacant seats

The following seats are vacant because of the death or resignation of the incumbent:

  1. Ohio's 11th congressional district: Incumbent Democrat Stephanie Tubbs Jones died of an aneurysm on August 20, 2008. On November 18, the district will hold a special election to fill Jones's seat for the remainder of the 110th Congress, until January 2009.

Defeated incumbents

Incumbents defeated for renomination

  1. : Wayne Gilchrest (R)
  2. : Albert Wynn (D) -subsequently resigned May 31, 2008
  3. : Chris Cannon (R)
  4. : David Davis (R)

Predictions

Shortly after the November 2006 election, Scott Elliott of ElectionProjection.com said that the Democratic majority would be tough to beat - at most the GOP could take back fourteen House seats - two short of a majority.

On April 8, 2008, analyst Stuart Rothenberg of The Rothenberg Political Report (who bills himself as non-partisan) stated that the fight for the House would be a "one-sided battle, with Democrats having most of the targets". He points to a list of one dozen seats (out of all 435 seats in the House) that are most likely to change hands, of those twelve, ten are open seats, seats which Republicans won by 3% or less in 2006 or otherwise endangered GOP seats.

In May 2007, conservative columnist Robert Novak wrote that he believed there were at least a few House seats that were won by Democrats in 2006 "solely because of GOP corruption," and that such seats would be "the most likely to return to the Republican column in 2008". He also said,

a continued sour mood over the Iraq War could produce another massive Republican defeat in 2008 that makes 2006 look tame by comparison. Republicans in Washington generally concede that the continued presence of U.S. troops in Iraq by next November could mean disaster for the party.
Novak qualified this by saying that in "previous elections, major House gains by either party have always been followed by losses in the next election".

InTrade.com, the only betting site currently offering odds on control of the House, puts the likelihood of the Democrats retaining control at about 90% as of early October 2008.

There have been three special elections for open Republican seats, IL-14 (formerly held by Dennis Hastert), LA-06 (formerly held by Richard Baker) and MS-01 (formerly held by Roger Wicker). Democrats won all three elections. After the MS-01 loss, Ron Gunzburger wrote, "GOP insiders in DC now privately acknowledge the Democratic victory in this seat likely foreshadows a dismal general election ahead for congressional Republicans."

Race ratings

The following table rates the competitiveness of selected races from around the country according to noted political analysts. Races not included should be considered "safe" for the incumbent's party. (Incumbents not running for re-election have parentheses around their name.)

District Incumbent Cook Rothenberg CQ Politics Crystal Ball
AL-2 (Everett) (R) Tossup Leans R Leans R Tossup
AL-5 (Cramer) (D) Tossup Pure Tossup No Clear Favorite Tossup
AK-AL Young (R) Tossup D Favored Leans D Leans D
AZ-1 (Renzi) (R) Leans D Tossup/Tilts D Leans D Leans D
AZ-3 Shadegg (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
AZ-5 Mitchell (D) Leans D Leans D Leans D Leans D
AZ-8 Giffords (D) Leans D Leans D Leans D Leans D
CA-4 (Doolittle) (R) Likely R R Favored Leans R Likely R
CA-11 McNerney (D) Leans D Tossup/Tilts D Leans D Leans D
CA-50 Bilbray (R) Solid R Limited Risk Safe R Likely R
CO-4 Musgrave (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
CT-2 Courtney (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Safe D
CT-4 Shays (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R No Clear Favorite Tossup
CT-5 Murphy (D) Likely D Limited Risk Leans D Likely D
FL-8 Keller (R) Tossup Pure Tossup Leans R Likely R
FL-13 Buchanan (R) Likely R R Favored Leans R Leans R
FL-15 (Weldon) (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
FL-16 Mahoney (D) Leans D Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
FL-21 Diaz-Balart (R) Tossup Pure Tossup Leans R Leans R
FL-22 Klein (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Safe D
FL-24 Feeney (R) Tossup Pure Tossup Leans R Leans R
FL-25 Diaz-Balart (R) Leans R Leans R Leans R Likely R
GA-8 Marshall (D) Leans D Tossup/Tilts D Leans D Leans D
GA-12 Barrow (D) Likely D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
ID-1 Sali (R) Leans R R Favored R Favored Leans R
IL-6 Roskam (R) Likely R R Favored R Favored Safe R
IL-8 Bean (D) Likely D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
IL-10 Kirk (R) Leans R Leans R Leans R Leans R
IL-11 (Weller) (R) Leans D Tossup/Tilts D Leans D Leans D
IL-13 Biggert (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
IL-14 Foster (D) Leans D D Favored Leans D Leans D
IL-18 (LaHood) (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
IN-2 Donnelly (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Safe D
IN-3 Souder (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
IN-7 Carson (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Safe D
IN-8 Ellsworth (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
IN-9 Hill (D) Leans D D Favored Leans D Leans D
IA-4 Latham (R) Likely R Limited Risk Safe R Safe R
KS-2 Boyda (D) Tossup Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
KS-3 Moore (D) Likely D D Favored D Favored Likely D
KY-2 (Lewis) (R) Leans R Leans R R Favored Likely R
KY-3 Yarmuth (D) Leans D Leans D Leans D Leans D
LA-4 (McCrery) (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R Leans R Tossup
LA-6 Cazayoux (D) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R No Clear Favorite Tossup
LA-7 Boustany (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
ME-1 (Allen) (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Safe D
MD-1 (Gilchrest) (R) Leans R R Favored R Favored Leans R
MI-7 Walberg (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R No Clear Favorite Tossup
MI-9 Knollenberg (R) Tossup Leans R No Clear Favorite Leans R
MN-1 Walz (D) Likely D Limited Risk Leans D Likely D
MN-2 Kline (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
MN-3 (Ramstad) (R) Tossup Pure Tossup No Clear Favorite Tossup
MN-6 Bachman (R) Likely R R Favored R Favored Safe R
MS-1 Childers (D) Tossup D Favored Leans D Leans D
MO-6 Graves (R) Leans R Leans R Leans R Leans R
MO-9 (Hulshof) (R) Leans R R Favored Leans R Leans R
NE-2 Terry (R) Leans R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
NV-2 Heller (R) Leans R Limited Risk Leans R Leans R
NV-3 Porter (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
NH-1 Shea-Porter (D) Tossup Pure Tossup No Clear Favorite Leans D
NH-2 Hodes (D) Likely D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
NJ-3 (Saxton) (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
NJ-5 Garrett (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
NJ-7 (Ferguson) (R) Tossup Pure Tossup No Clear Favorite Tossup
NM-1 (Wilson) (R) Tossup Pure Tossup No Clear Favorite Tossup
NM-2 (Pearce) (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R Leans R Leans R
NY-13 (Fossella) (R) Likely D D Favored D Favored Likely D
NY-19 Hall (D) Solid D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
NY-20 Gillibrand (D) Likely D D Favored Leans D Leans D
NY-24 Arcuri (D) Likely D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
NY-25 (Walsh) (R) Likely D D Favored Leans D Leans D
NY-26 (Reynolds) (R) Leans R Tossup/Tilts R Leans R Leans R
NY-29 Kuhl (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R Leans R Leans R
NC-8 Hayes (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R No Clear Favorite Leans R
NC-10 McHenry (R) Likely R Limited Risk Safe R Safe R
OH-1 Chabot (R) Tossup Leans R Leans R Leans R
OH-2 Schmidt (R) Likely R Leans R Leans R Leans R
OH-7 (Hobson) (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
OH-14 LaTourette (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Safe R
OH-15 (Pryce) (R) Tossup Pure Tossup No Clear Favorite Tossup
OH-16 (Regula) (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
OH-18 Space (D) Likely D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
OR-5 (Hooley) (D) Likely D Leans D Leans D Likely D
PA-3 English (R) Tossup Leans R No Clear Favorite Leans R
PA-4 Altmire (D) Leans D Leans D Leans D Leans D
PA-6 Gerlach (R) Likely R R Favored R Favored Likely R
PA-8 Murphy (D) Likely D Limited Risk D Favored Likely D
PA-10 Carney (D) Tossup Pure Tossup Leans D Leans D
PA-11 Kanjorski (D) Tossup Tossup/Tilts D No Clear Favorite Tossup
PA-15 Dent (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
PA-18 Murphy (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
TN-04 Davis (D) Likely D Limited Risk Safe D Safe D
TX-7 Culberson (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
TX-10 McCaul (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
TX-22 Lampson (D) Tossup Leans R No Clear Favorite Tossup
TX-23 Rodriguez (D) Likely D Limited Risk Leans D Likely D
VA-2 Drake (R) Leans R Leans R R Favored Leans R
VA-5 Goode (R) Likely R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
VA-10 Wolf (R) Solid R Limited Risk R Favored Likely R
VA-11 (Davis) (R) Leans D Leans D Leans D Leans D
WA-8 Reichert (R) Tossup Tossup/Tilts R No Clear Favorite Tossup
WV-2 Capito (R) Likely R R Favored Leans R Likely R
WI-8 Kagen (D) Leans D Tossup/Tilts D Leans D Leans D
WY-AL (Cubin) (R) Likely R Limited Risk Leans R Likely R

Factors

The Democrats control the 110th United States Congress and the House of Representatives.

Factors that could make the races seen below competitive include:

Factor Reason Example
Age The incumbent will be at least 70 years of age on Election Day 2008, and may opt to retire rather than run for another term, leaving their seat open. Several representatives are at least 70 years of age, with the oldest being Ralph Hall (R-TX), age 85. So far, three representatives 70 years of age or older, all Republicans, have decided not to seek re-election.
District demographics The incumbent represents a district that leans or strongly favors the opposing party. For example, an incumbent Republican representing a district that went to John Kerry or barely went to George W. Bush in 2004 could be vulnerable, especially if the incumbent received no more than 55% of the vote. There are, as of the 2006 elections, about 70 Democratic seats won by Bush in 2004, compared to 4 Republican seats won by Kerry. This is a change from (as of 2004) 44 Democrats in seats Bush won in both 2000 and 2004, as opposed to 11 Republicans in districts won by Gore and Kerry. Christopher Shays (R-CT) and Chet Edwards (D-TX) represent districts that favor the opposing party. Additionally, Tom Davis (R-VA) represents a swing (but Democratic-trending) district while Brad Ellsworth (D-IN) represents a district that is politically balanced and known for competitive races.
Governor controversies Some House races could also be affected by an unpopular governor if the incumbent's party is the same as that of the governor. For example, some Indiana and Missouri races involving incumbent Republicans could be affected by the unpopularity of their Republican governors.
Health issues The incumbent has constant health issues and could either be forced into early retirement, forgo plans for a re-election bid, or die during their term in Congress. Elton Gallegly (R-CA) and Bill Young (R-FL) pondered retirement for health reasons before running for re-election 2006. Additionally, six members of the House (3 Republicans, 3 Democrats) died during the 110th Congress.
Higher office aspirations The incumbent might consider running for higher political office, whether it is for a U.S. Senate seat, the governor's mansion, or for mayor of a major city. Mark Udall (D-CO) will run for the U.S. Senate seat of retiring Senator Wayne Allard (R-CO). Bobby Jindal (R-LA) was elected governor of Louisiana. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) is rumored to be considering a run for mayor of New York City in 2009.
Redistricting Some incumbents could become vulnerable if redistricting affects their districts to the point that it favors the opposing party. For example, a Democrat could become vulnerable if his Democratic-leaning district becomes more Republican. Two recent redistrictings, in Texas in 2003 and in Georgia in 2005, have made some Democratic districts more vulnerable. In 2006, Georgia Democrats John Barrow and Jim Marshall faced tough re-election bids.
Scandals The incumbent is involved in a highly publicized political scandal or whose district was previously represented by a scandal-plagued representative from the opposing party. The Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal affected several members of Congress, many of whom were defeated in 2006. Some key Abramoff donor recipients, such as John Doolittle (R-CA) are still in office. Additionally, Democrats Nick Lampson (D-TX) and Tim Mahoney (D-FL) took the respective districts of Tom DeLay (R-TX) and Mark Foley (R-FL), both of which heavily favor Republicans, in the previous election.
Presidential coattails The 2008 presidential campaign could have positive or negative effects on the chances of election for some House candidates if the background, home state or region, ideology/policies or general perception of their party's 2008 candidate affect party support or turnout in their particular district. See coattail effect.

Races by state

Alabama

  • : Incumbent Terry Everett (R), 71, is retiring. This district covers southeastern Alabama, including Dothan and Montgomery. The Republican nominee, State Rep. Jay Love, will be favored to hold this district — George W. Bush won 67% in 2004 here (CPVI=R+13). The Democratic nominee is Montgomery Mayor Bobby Bright.
  • : In a surprise, incumbent Bud Cramer (D) will retire after 18 years. This northern tier district usually votes Republican in national elections, giving Republicans a chance of a pick-up. The Republican nominee is insurance agent and 1994 and 1996 nominee Wayne Parker. The Democratic nominee is state Senator Parker Griffith. Cramer endorsed Griffith on April 8.

Alaska

  • : Incumbent Don Young (R), who is often referred to as "Alaska's third Senator" since the district he represents covers the entire state, is running for re-election. Despite representing Alaska in the House since 1973, Young is now vulnerable due to a corruption investigation involving the misuse of campaign funds. Young's age (75), alleged corruption, and stance on federal pork gave him a tough Republican primary and now a competitive general election. Young defeated lieutenant governor Sean Parnell in the Republican primary by 304 votes. Among Democrats, former state Representative Ethan Berkowitz defeated 2006 Democratic Party congressional nominee Diane Benson (who lost to Young in 2006 by 56% to 40%) in the Democratic primary, 55% to 37%. Bush won 61% of the vote here in 2004 (CPVI=R+14). A December 11, 2007 poll had Young trailing Berkowitz 49% to 42%.

Arizona

  • : In August 2007, incumbent Rick Renzi (R) announced he would not seek re-election, four months after the FBI raided Renzi's family business as part of a federal investigation. Renzi received only 52% of the vote against his Democratic opponent – Sedona civil rights attorney Ellen Simon – in 2006; George W. Bush won 54% of the vote in this northern Arizona State district in 2004 (CPVI=R+2). State Representative Ann Kirkpatrick is the Democratic nominee. Public affairs consultant Sydney Ann Hay, who ran unsuccessfully in 2002, is the Republican nominee. Civil Engineer Brent Maupin is the Independent candidate.
  • : Outspoken conservative John Shadegg (R) had announced that he would not be a candidate for re-election, however, ten days later, announced that he would seek re-election. The district votes Republican in most elections. Democratic tax attorney Bob Lord, The Democratic nominee, outraised Shadegg in the first quarter of 2007 and has continued to raise large amounts, though he now trails Shadegg in funds. Libertarian Attorney Michael Shoen has announced his candidacy.
  • : Freshman Harry Mitchell (D) unseated conservative J.D. Hayworth (R) by 50% to 47% in this Republican-leaning district (CPVI=R+4) in the northeastern Phoenix suburbs that gave George W. Bush 54% of the vote in 2004. The largely Republican nature of this district make a tough 2008 race likely, though Mitchell, who has a government complex in Tempe named after him, has won a lot of tough elections in the past. He will be seriously opposed in 2008. Maricopa County Treasurer David Schweikert is the Republican nominee. Businessman Warren Severin is the Libertarian candidate.
  • : Gabrielle Giffords (D) defeated conservative Randy Graf (R) by a 54% to 42% margin in 2006. Giffords could have a difficult re-election bid now that State Senate President Tim Bee is the Republican nominee. Moderate former Rep. Jim Kolbe originally supported Bee's candidacy, but in July ceased to do so.Bush narrowly won here with 52% to 47% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+1). Afghanistan veteran Derek Tidball is also running as an Independent.

Arkansas

None of Arkansas' four congressmen (Three democrats and one Republican) face a major party challenge.

California

  • : On January 10 2008, nine-term incumbent John Doolittle (R) announced he would retire when his term expires in 2009, to the relief of his fellow Republicans. He has been associated with the corruption scandals of Jack Abramoff and defense contractor Brent Wilkes. In 2006, Doolittle received only 49% of the vote compared to 46% for his opponent, retired Lt. Colonel and war veteran Charlie Brown (D). Brown is again the Democratic nominee. The FBI raided Doolitte's home in April 2007 in search of incriminating evidence, and speculation abounds that Doolittle will be indicted. This district leans Republican - George W. Bush won 61% here in 2004 (CPVI=R+11) - and normally could be expected to be a safe seat for the GOP. However, many pundits believed Doolittle faced almost certain defeat if he ran again. The Republican nominee is State Senator Tom McClintock, a conservative who was ran near-successful races for state Controller in 1994 and 2002.
  • : This seat, held by house Speaker Nancy Pelosi, is in urban San Francisco, and considered relatively safe for the Democrats in any election year. The Republican nominee is Businesswoman and community leader Dana Walsh. However, prominent anti-war activist and "Peace Mom" Cindy Sheehan has declared as a "People before Politics" Independent candidate and will be challenging Pelosi this fall. It is unclear what impact this will have on the race, but many believe this will be an interesting race to watch. Pelosi is very popular and most pundits believe Sheehan has little to no chance of winning.
  • : Republicans will look to oppose Jerry McNerney (D), who defeated scandal-plagued incumbent Richard Pombo in 2006 with 53%. The district includes portions of the rural Sacramento Valley, as well as parts of the East Bay. It has a slight Republican lean (CPVI=R+3), but has become more Democratic recently with the arrival of transplants from the Bay Area. Pombo has ruled out a rematch. Former Assemblyman Dean Andal is the Republican nominee. Bush won here with 54% to 46% in 2004.
  • : This race is for an open seat, being vacated by former Republican presidential nominee, Representative Duncan Hunter. The Republican nominee is Hunter's son, Iraq War veteran CPT Duncan Duane Hunter. The Democratic nominee is Iraq War veteran CDR Mike Lumpkin. The Libertarian nominee is 2002 congressional candidate Mike Benoit.

Colorado

  • : With the retirement of Senator Wayne Allard, popular incumbent Mark Udall (D) will run for Senate, which will leave an open seat in this district. However, Democrats hold a strong edge in this district (John Kerry won 59% here, CPVI=D+8), as it is centered around heavily Democratic Boulder. Businessman Jared Polis is the Democratic nominee, defeating state Senate president Joan Fitz-Gerald. Scott Starin is the Republican nominee. Internet businessman Bill Hammons is also running as the Unity Party candidate.
  • : Conservative Marilyn Musgrave (R), known for her staunch opposition to gay marriage, won only after winning a plurality (46%) of the vote against Angie Paccione (D) and a strong Reform Party challenge from Eric Eidsness, who got 11% of the vote. That, along with her 51% showing in 2004 despite George W. Bush winning 58% of the vote in this eastern Colorado district that includes the Fort Collins area (CPVI=R+9), could make her vulnerable in 2008. Democrats suffered a setback when state Sen. Brandon Schaffer dropped out, citing his party's failure to clear the field. The Democratic nominee is Betsy Markey, businesswoman and regional director for U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar. 2006 nominee Angie Paccione briefly launched a campaign, but left the race in September 2007.
  • : Republican incumbent Tom Tancredo (R) announced his intention to retire in order to run what was an unsuccessful campaign for president. The district includes suburbs of Denver. However, Tancredo's seat is considered to be the most Republican-dominated district of the Denver-area seats (CPVI=R+10) (and also one of the wealthiest in the nation). Tancredo was the second highest vote getter for a Republican congressional candidate statewide (59%-40%) in 2006, just behind Doug Lamborn in the 5th district. The district includes Columbine High School, which was devastated in a tragic 1999 school massacre, although Democratic attempts to target him on his outspoken views on gun rights in the 2000 election came up short (he prevailed 53% to 44%). Colorado Secretary of State Mike Coffman (R) is the Republican nominee. On the Democratic side, former Appleton, Wisconsin City Councilor Hank Eng is the Democratic nominee.

Connecticut

  • : In the closest U.S. House race of 2006, Joe Courtney (D) unseated three-term incumbent Rob Simmons by 82 votes. Courtney's chance at re-election increased when Simmons decided against a rematch. Republican former Groton sub base commander Sean Sullivan has announced his candidacy. However, John Kerry won 55% here in 2004 (CPVI=D+8), so Courtney may be hard to unseat, especially in a presidential year. Former State Department Of Environmental Protection scientist Scott Deshefy is running as a Green Party candidate, Todd Vachon as a Socialist Party candidate, and Dan Reale as a Libertarian.
  • : Chris Shays (R) won 51% of the vote in 2006 and 52% in 2004 in a district that went to John Kerry with 53% in 2004 (CPVI=D+5). The only Republican House member in New England, he will likely be a top target of Democrats if he runs in 2008. Former Goldman Sachs executive and community activist Jim Himes is the Democratic nominee. Richard Z. Duffee is running again as the Green Party Candidate after withdrawing form the 2006 race.
  • : Arguably the most conservative district in Connecticut - although it went to John Kerry with 50% to 48% in 2004 (CPVI=D+4). Freshman Chris Murphy (D) could be vulnerable, despite having unseated 24-year incumbent Nancy Johnson with 56% of the vote in 2006. Republican state Senator David Cappiello is his parties' nominee. National Republicans have begun running radio ads in the summer of 2007 claiming Murphy has adopted special interest fundraising politics he had claimed to oppose. In addition, Cappiello has accused Murphy of missing important votes. Canton, Attorney Harold Burbank is running as a Green Party candidate.

Delaware

Delaware's sole Congressman, Republican Michael Castle, is expected to win reelection over minor Democratic opposition.

Florida

  • : Four-term incumbent Ric Keller (R), won a primary challenge against a lawyer and talk radio hist by only 53%, leading to signs that he may be vulnerable. Democrats have nominated lawyer Alan Grayson, who has been included on the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's "Red to Blue" list, which can give him additional financial aid. The district leans Republican: George W. Bush won 55% here in 2004 (CPVI=R+3).
  • : Freshman Vern Buchanan (R) was certified as having won his first term by a 369-vote margin over banker Christine Jennings, but Jennings challenged the election in court. Although Buchanan was seated by the House, the House has made no final decision on the matter. Regardless, this is expected to be a competitive race in 2008, though Buchanan is far ahead of Jennings in fundraising and is favored to win by political pundits. In mid-July, Jennings announced she would run again in 2008. Further complicating matters for Jennings, former Democratic Congressional candidate Jan Schneider has filed to run as an Independent. George W. Bush won 56% of the district's vote in 2004 (CPVI=R+4).
  • : Seven-term incumbent Dave Weldon had easily won re-election contests for a decade. Weldon is retiring in 2008. State Senator Bill Posey is the Republican nominee and will most likely be favored to win. The Democratic nominee is physician Steve Blythe. Attorney and Ron Paul activist Frank Zilaitis is also running as an independent. Bush won 57% of the vote here in 2004 (CPVI=R+4).
  • : This is normally a solidly Republican district, so consensus is that Tim Mahoney's 50% to 48% win in 2006 can be attributed to the Mark Foley scandal. The Republican nominee Joe Negron's campaign was harmed by the fact that Foley's name remained on the ballot even though he was not a candidate. Thus Mahoney may have a competitive race in 2008. Negron has announced that he will not run again. Attorney and Army veteran Tom Rooney defeated state Representative Gayle Harrell and Palm Beach Gardens city councilman Hal Valeche for the Republican nomination. George W. Bush won this district by a 10-point margin in 2004 (CPVI=R+2).
  • : Incumbent Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R) has faced nothing more than token opposition since his first election. But this year, he could face a very tough race. Former Hialeah Mayor Raul L. Martinez (D) is running and he is very well-known in the area and could be a formidable challenger. Bush won 57% of the vote here in 2004 (CPVI=R+4).
  • : First-term incumbent Ron Klein (D) might face a challenge in this Fort Lauderdale area district that barely went to John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=D+4). Former army officer and Iraq War veteran Allen West is the Republican nominee. Mike Prysner, an Iraq War veteran, peace activist, and college student, is running on the Party for Socialism and Liberation ticket.
  • : Tom Feeney (R) could have a challenging race in 2008. Feeney's district includes the Orlando suburbs as well as the Space Coast of Florida. Feeney was re-elected by 58% to 42%, less than expected especially considering that Feeney reportedly drew the district for himself while serving as speaker of the state house. Democrats have recruited former State Rep. Suzanne Kosmas to challenge Feeney in 2008. Feeney has been criticized for his close ties to disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff. George W. Bush won 55% here in 2004 (CPVI=R+3).
  • : Incumbent Mario Diaz-Balart (R) faces a challenge from the Miami-Dade County Democratic Party chairman, Joe Garcia, a former executive director of the Cuban American National Foundation (CANF).

Georgia

  • : Jim Marshall (D) survived a challenge from former Republican congressman Mac Collins in 2006 by 1,752 votes and will face a tough re-election bid in 2008 against retired Air Force Major General Rick Goddard, the Republican nominee. Goddard's background may have great appeal in a district with a large number of veterans, though Marshall has his own military background and is has well-established credibility on military issues. The present district, which was implemented starting with the 2006 election, would have given George W. Bush 61% of the vote in 2004 (CPVI=R+8).
  • : John Barrow (D) may face a tough challenge from Republicans in 2008 after an 864-vote win over former Rep. Max Burns (R) in their 2006 rematch. Barrow had defeated then-incumbent Burns in 2004 with 52% of the vote, but in 2007 Burns declined to run again. The present district, which was implemented starting with the 2006 election, would have given John Kerry 51% in 2004 (CPVI=D+2). Barrow won against State Senator Regina Thomas in the Democratic primary. On the Republican side, radio announcer and former congressional aide John Stone won against mechanical engineer and former presidential candidate Ray McKinney and Ben Crystal.

Hawaii

Both of Hawaii's Congressmen (both Democrats), are expected to win reelection over minor Republican opposition.

Idaho

  • : Conservative Republican Bill Sali won this open seat race with 49.9 percent of the vote in 2006, a mediocre showing at best in this heavily Republican district that gave Bush 68 percent in 2004 (CPVI=R+19). Also, as a member of the Idaho Legislature Sali caused considerable controversy by repeatedly citing a link between breast cancer and abortion without being able to provide evidence. Although Sali was elected the GOP freshman leader in the House, his term in Washington thus far has been relatively quiet. Sali defeated Iraq War veteran Matt Salisbury in the March 27 primary.. Walt Minnick, an army veteran, Boise businessman, and the Democratic Idaho U.S. Senate nominee in 1996 is the Democratic nominee. All this, combined with a more competitive political landscape in the rapidly growing Boise area (where Democrats picked up five seats in the Idaho Legislature in 2006), may make this race worth watching in 2008.

Illinois

  • : Freshman Peter Roskam (R) won his first term in Congress by a close 51% to 49% margin. This west suburban district was once solidly Republican, but has become more Democratic in recent years. It narrowly went to George W. Bush with 53% to 47% in 2004 (CPVI=R+3). Roskam will face Democrat Jill Morgenthaler, a retired U.S. Army Reserve Colonel and Iraq War veteran.
  • : Melissa Bean (D) gained national attention by toppling longtime incumbent Phil Crane in 2004. However, the 8th is considered the most Republican of the Chicago suburban districts, and Bean has had a perennial spot on Republican target lists. Bean will face at least two challengers, Republican businessman, and former professional hockey player Steve Greenberg and Green Party candidate Iain Abernathy in the general election.
  • : Mark Kirk (R) survived a close race in 2006, winning by 53% to 47%. The district, the state's wealthiest, went for John Kerry with 54% in 2004 (CPVI=D+4). In December 2006, Kirk disclaimed any interest in the 2008 U.S. Senate race against the Democratic incumbent, Dick Durbin. Kirk will again face his 2006 opponent, Dan Seals, who won the Democratic primary with 81% against a credible opponent. David Kalbfleisch, the founder of the Arlington Heights chapter of the Green Party, has announced that he will run for the seat. Kalbfleisch is a navy veteran and member of Iraq Veterans Against the War.
  • : Jerry Weller will be retiring at the end of his seventh term. Weller (R) won 55% of the vote in a district that narrowly went for George W. Bush in 2004 with 53% to 47% for John Kerry (CPVI=R+1). The Republican nominee was New Lenox Mayor Tim Baldermann, but he announced in February that he was dropping out of the race. Local businessman Martin Ozinga was chosen to replace Baldermann as the Republican candidate. State Senate Majority Leader Debbie Halvorson is the Democratic nominee. Jason Wallace, a veteran of the Iraq War and chair of the IBHE-SAC, is running as a Green Party candidate.
  • : Democrat Bill Foster won this seat in a special election after former Republican Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert resigned. The Republican nominee is businessman Jim Oberweis, whom Foster defeated in the special election 53%–47%. Robert Hill is also running as the nominee of the Green Party. George W. Bush won this district with 55% of the vote in 2004 (CPVI= R+5).

  • : Ray LaHood (R) has announced that he will not seek re-election in 2008 The district, based in Peoria, was once represented by former House Minority Leader Bob Michel. The district leans Republican, but not overwhelmingly so (CPVI=R+5). State Representative Aaron Schock (R) won the Republican nomination. The Democratic nominee is news personality Colleen Callahan. The Green Party candidate is Sheldon Schafer.

Indiana

  • : In 2006, Joe Donnelly (D) won by 54% to 46% in this swing district that went to Bush with 55% of the vote in 2004 (CPVI=R+4), largely as a result of displeasure with the GOP both nationally and at the state level. Small business owner Luke Puckett, is the Republican nominee.
  • : On December 15, 2007, incumbent Julia Carson (D) died. Carson's grandson and Indianapolis City-County Council member André Carson, was elected to fill this seat. (See Indiana's 7th congressional district special election, 2008). The district is centered around urban Indianapolis and leans Democratic, however, Republicans scored a major upset in last year's Indianapolis mayoral election with Greg Ballard defeating eight year incumbent Bart Peterson. Kerry won 58% here (CPVI=D+9). Carson defeated Democratic challengers, State Representative David Orentlicher, State Representative Carolene Mays, and former State Health Commissioner Woodrow Myers in the primary. Carson is running against Gabrielle Campo.
  • : In 2006, freshman Brad Ellsworth (D) unseated John Hostettler (R) by 61% to 39%, surprising even his fellow Democrats by the margin. He will be a formidable candidate for re-election, but no incumbent can rest easy in this district, known as "The Bloody 8th" for its history of rejecting incumbents and hotly contested races. Greg Goode, a government affairs official at Indiana State, is the Republican nominee. Bush won 61% here to 39% in 2004 (CPVI=R+9).
  • : Baron Hill (D) narrowly won his old job back by 50% to 46% in 2006. The district went to George W. Bush with 59% of the vote in 2004 (CPVI=R+7). Hill and Mike Sodrel (R) have faced off in three consecutive elections, Hill winning the first and third and Sodrel the second on a recount, so the outcome in 2008 is anything but certain. To the delight and relief of his fellow Republicans, Sodrel is running again. Eric Schansberg the 2006 Libertarian candidate has announced he is again seeking his party's nomination.

Iowa

  • : Tom Latham (R) Despite representing a district that was almost evenly divided in the last two presidential elections, Republican incumbent Tom Latham has never been re-elected with anything less than 55% of the vote. Community and party activist Becky Greenwald is the Democratic nominee.

Kansas

  • : Nancy Boyda (D) narrowly upset Jim Ryun (R) in 2006. Her district gave Bush 58% to 40% in 2004 (CPVI=R+7), and she could be vulnerable, as her victory was aided by infighting between the moderate and conservative factions of the state GOP, which hurt turnout for Ryun. Moderate state Treasurer Lynn Jenkins (R) is the Republican nominee, defeating Ryun 51% to 49% in a mild surprise.
  • : Dennis Moore (D) represents a district that voted for Bush with 55% to 45% in 2004 (CPVI=R+7). It is centered around the western suburbs of Kansas City, including Overland Park, and heavily Democratic Lawrence, home of the University of Kansas. Moore won easily in 2006, but had difficulty in winning his previous four terms. He faces another tough race in 2008. State Senator Nick Jordan (R), who is supported by both conservatives and moderates, is the Republican nominee.

Kentucky

  • : Incumbent Ron Lewis withdrew his re-election bid hours before the filing deadline, to the surprise of many in his party. It was believed that he intended to be succeeded by his Chief of Staff, Daniel London. However, state Senator Brett Guthrie learned of Lewis's retirement just before the deadline, and filed himself . After Guthrie won some key endorsements, London withdrew from the race. leaving Guthrie unopposed for the Republican nomination. State Senator David Boswell is the Democratic nominee.
  • : Incumbent Democrat John Yarmuth narrowly unseated Republican Anne Northup in 2006 with 51%. Northup will try to regain this Louisville-centered district she held for 10 years. A comfortable Yarmuth lead has narrowed slightly in recent weeks. John Kerry won this district with 52% in 2004 (CPVI=D+2).

Louisiana

  • : Incumbent Bill Jefferson has been indicted on 16 counts of corruption, complicating his re-election bid. In the Democratic primary, he placed first in a field of seven candidates finishing with 25% of the vote. Because no candidate received at least 50% of the vote, he will face the second place finisher, former TV anchor Helena Moreno,, who won 20% of the vote. The Republican nominee is Anh "Joseph" Cao. The district includes nearly all of New Orleans and some of its suburbs, and is heavily Democratic: John Kerry won 75% of the vote here in 2004. Because of Hurricane Gustav's effects, the state has ruled that the primary runoff will be held on November 4 in place of the general election, with the general election moving to December 6.
  • : Incumbent Jim McCrery is retriring. The district contains northwestern Louisiana, including the cities of Shreveport, DeRidder, and Natchitoches. The district usually, but not reliably, votes Republican, as Bill Clinton won it comfortably in 1996. Both party's will hold runoff's, as no candidate received at least 50% of the vote in his primary. The Republican candidates will be former Webster Perish coroner, businessman, and physician John Fleming, and trucking company executive Chris Gorman. On the Democratic side, Caddo Parish District Attorney Paul Carmouche will be favored over Attorney Willie Banks Jr. Due to the effects of Hurricane Gustav, the state has ruled that the primary runoff will be held on November 4 in place of the general election, with the general election moving to December 6.
  • : Democrat Don Cazayoux defeated Republican Woody Jenkins 49%–46% in a special election in order to succeed Republican Richard Baker. Given Cazayoux's narrow margin of victory and the Republican-leaning nature of the district (Bush won 59% here in 2004), it is expected that Cazayoux will be a GOP target as he runs for his first full term. The only announced Republican candidate is State Senator Bill Cassidy. Democratic state representative Michael Jackson announced that he would run as an independent after Cazayoux defeated him in the primary.
  • : Republican incumbent Charles Boustany was re-elected in 2006 with 70% of the vote, but faces a challenge from Don Cravins Jr., a Democratic state Senator. Cravins holds several conservative views, such as support for gun owners' rights, and has been identified by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee as a top recruit. Boustany has the advantage of running in a district that gave George W. Bush 60% of the vote in 2004, as well as more cash-on-hand.

Maine

  • : Incumbent Tom Allen is running for the U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Susan Collins in 2008. Democrats would be favored to hold this seat but would not be assured of victory; John Kerry won 55% here in 2004 (CPVI=D+6). Former Common Cause President and Fmr. Maine Senate Majority Leader Chellie Pingree, who ran against Collins in 2002 is the Democratic nominee. On the Republican side, former state Senator, Northeast Small Business Administration Director and Iraq War veteran Charlie Summers, who ran against Allen in 2004 is the Republican nominee.

Maryland

  • : Incumbent Wayne Gilchrest was defeated in the Republican primary by conservative state Senator Andrew P. Harris. Gilchrest is a liberal-to-moderate Republican and voted for the bill to set a timetable on the Iraq War. Only 2 Republicans voted for the bill, which passed 218-to-212, and also voted on April 25, 2007 for another Democratic Iraq War bill which passed 218-208. Harris was endorsed by the Club for Growth, former Governor Bob Ehrlich seven of the eight state senators who represent parts of the district, and Maryland House Minority leader Anthony J. O'Donnell. The Democratic nominee is Queen Anne's County State Attorney Frank Kratovil Jr., who was endorsed by Governor Martin O'Malley, Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot, and, on September 2, by Gilchrest. George W. Bush won with 62% here in 2004 (CPVI=R+10). A 2008-02-14 poll found Harris with a 37%-to-22% lead over Kratovil.
  • : After edging out political upstart Donna Edwards in 2006, Democratic Congressman Al Wynn (D) was soundly defeated by her in the Democratic primary in 2008. The primary had become increasingly negative, with Edwards accusing Wynn of supporting special interest legislation and Wynn accusing Edwards of failing to pay taxes during the 1990s. After his primary loss, Wynn resigned in June to take up a job at a lobbying firm. Edwards was then elected in a special election for the seat. In the November general elections, Edwards will face Republican Peter James and Green Party candidate Brian Crider. The district is overwhelmingly Democratic (CPVI=D+30).

Massachusetts

All ten of Massachusetts' Congressmen (all Democrats) are expected to win reelection over minor Republican opposition.

Michigan

  • : Tim Walberg (R) won this Republican-leaning district (which went to Bush with 54% to 45% in 2004) (CPVI=R+2) with 49.93% of the vote in 2006 after defeating freshman incumbent Joe Schwarz in the Republican primary with financial backing from the conservative Club for Growth. Walberg faces a tough race in 2008 as the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has targeted his seat. State Senate Minority Leader Mark Schauer defeated 2006 Democratic nominee Sharon Renier in the August 5 primary for the right to face Walberg in November.
  • : In January 2006, Joe Knollenberg (R) announced his intent to seek re-election in 2008. Knollenberg spent $2.7 million to keep his seat in the House. Although his past Democratic opponents have not received support from the national party, the seat has now been identified as a "target" for the Democrats in 2008, as the DCCC is targeting districts where Republicans garnered less than 55% of the vote. Knollenberg, who will be 75 in 2008, won only 52% of the vote in 2006 in this eastern Oakland County district that gave George W. Bush only 50% of the vote in 2004 (CPVI=R+0) and is far from the Republican stronghold it once was. The district was once the most Republican in Metro Detroit, having sent Knollenberg's predecessor, Republican Bill Broomfield, to Congress for 36 years. The only Democrat to officially run is Michigan Lottery Commissioner Gary Peters, the 2002 Democratic nominee for state Attorney General and former State Senator. Radio talk show hostess Nancy Skinner, who was Knollenberg's 2006 opponent, decided not to run. Controversial and well known pathologist Dr. Jack Kevorkian announced he is running as an independent candidate.

Minnesota

  • : Bush barely won this southern Minnesota district with 51% to 48% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+0), which DFLer Tim Walz won in 2006. Walz could face a tough race, as he unseated 12-year incumbent Republican Gil Gutknecht by 53% to 47%. Oncologist Brian Davis is the Republican nominee.
  • : Jim Ramstad (R) is retiring and will not seek a tenth term; this is likely to be a very tough race as George W. Bush barely won with 51% to 49% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+1). Ramstad was re-elected in 2006 with 65% to Democrat Wendy Wilde's 35%. Some Democrats think that Ramstad had managed to keep his seat for so long (since 1991) because he had never faced a strong opponent and because of his very moderate social positions. Both parties have rallied around consensus candidates. In a major surprise, Iraq War veteran Ashwin Madia has won the Democratic nomination. Republican state Representative and former state house majority leader Erik Paulsen has announced his candidacy. This will be a top priority for both Democrats and Republicans. David Dillon of the Independence Party is also running.
  • : Michelle Bachman (R) was one of the GOP's success stories in 2006, defeating Patty Wetterling (DFL) by a larger-than-expected margin. Former state Transportation Commissioner Elwyn Tinklenberg is running as a Democrat , and is a moderate who ran in 2006 but lost the nomination to the more liberal Wetterling. Bush won here by 56% to 44% in 2004 (CPVI=R+6).

Mississippi

Missouri

  • : Democrats hope to wage a competitive campaign against Republican U.S. Representative Sam Graves in a politically varied North Kansas City/St. Joseph district. They have nominated former Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes, who refused to run in 2006. Bush won 57% here in 2004 (CPVI=R+5).
  • — Incumbent Kenny Hulshof is retiring to run for Governor of Missouri, after having not faced a serious Congressional challenger in the past five election cycles. The district leans Republican but was Democratic until Hulshof's election in 1996, although redistricting in 2000 made the district slightly more Republican-leaning than it was in the 90s. It includes several western St. Charles County suburbs of St. Louis and a large amount of rural areas (which are normally Republican) but also the Democratic leaning college town of Columbia. Democratic state Representative Judy Baker will face Republican state Tourism Director Blaine Luetkemeyer in the general election. Bush won 58% here in 2004 (CPVI=R+7).

Montana

Montana's sole Congressman, Republican Denny Rehberg is facing only minimal Democratic opposition in his reelection bid.

Nebraska

  • : In 1999, then freshman incumbent Republican Lee Terry announced that he would break the term-limits pledge he made in his 1998 campaign. This garnered some bad press, but he won three more terms with little trouble. However, in 2006, he won by 55% to 45%, much less than expected in a solidly Republican district. His Democratic opponent in that race, Omaha businessman Jim Esch, is the Democratic nominee to face Terry.

Nevada

  • : Republican Dean Heller was elected to this seat with 50% of the vote in 2006. University of Nevada Regent Jill Derby, his 2006 opponent, who has since become Chair of the Nevada Democratic Party will run again. Bush won 57% here in 2004.
  • : Republican Jon Porter won by only 48% to 46% in 2006 against a former aide to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and 54% in 2004. Porter could face another tough race in this suburban Las Vegas district. George W. Bush barely won this district with 50% to 49% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=D+1). Leading Democratic candidates included Fraud Examiner Andrew Martin and Clark County prosecutor Robert Daskas, but Daskas dropped out in late April, citing family concerns. After losing their top candidate, the Democratic Party has quickly recruited Nevada Senate Minority Leader Dina Titus. Also running are Bob Giaquinta of the Green Party, Floyd Fitzgibbons of the Independent American Party, Joseph P. Silvestri of the Libertarian Party, and independent Jeffrey C. Reeves.

New Hampshire

  • : Democrat Carol Shea-Porter squeaked into Congress by a 51% to 49% margin against incumbent Republican Jeb Bradley in one of the greatest upsets of the 2006 election cycle. Bradley is again the Republican nominee. He faced and defeated Former Assistant Attorney General and Department of Health and Human Services commissioner John Stephen in a close Republican primary. George W. Bush narrowly won this district with 51% to 49% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+0). Latest Polling (July): Shea-Porter 40%, Bradley 46%, Undecided 14%.
  • : Democrat Paul Hodes upended Republican incumbent Charlie Bass in 2006, taking a 53% to 45% victory in a district John Kerry narrowly won with 52% in 2004 (CPVI=D+3). Given that New Hampshire has traditionally leaned Republican – though it has been trending more Democratic recently – the GOP might look to oppose Hodes. The Republican nominee is radio talk show hostess Jennifer Horn.

New Jersey

  • : Incumbent Republican Jim Saxton has announced that he will retire at the end of his current term. This district is historically Republican, but George W. Bush barely won with 51% to 49% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=D+3). Also, Al Gore won his district by a significant margin in 2000. Some Democrats think that Saxton had managed to keep his seat for so long (since 1984) because he rarely faced credible opposition. The Republican nominee is Medford Mayor, VP of Lockheed Martin, and Gulf War veteran Chris Myers. State Senator John Adler is the Democratic nominee and could be a formidable candidate, though he faces an outsider disadvantage; his State Senate district's only city that is in the 3rd Congressional District is his home town of Cherry Hill.
  • : Incumbent Scott Garrett has been elected by safe margins in the past but in 2006 he only won by 10 points against Paul Aronsohn the lowest of his career.The district contains most of Northern New Jersey including the cities of Paramus and Ridgewood. The Democratic nominee is Rabbi Dennis G. Shulman.
  • : Republican Mike Ferguson barely won his re-election bid in 2006, edging state Assemblywoman Linda Stender by 49% to 48%. In a major surprise, Ferguson recently announced that he will not run for re-election. George W. Bush narrowly won this district with 53% to 46% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+1). The Republican nominee is state Senator (and outgoing Senate Minority Leader) Leonard Lance of Hunterdon County. Assemblywoman Linda Stender is again the Democratic nominee. Bridgewater Councilman Michael Hsing is running as an Independent candidate.

New Mexico

  • : The 2006 race between incumbent Republican Heather Wilson and Democratic state Attorney General Patricia Madrid was a cliffhanger, with Wilson being re-elected by 861 votes. John Kerry narrowly won this Albuquerque-based district with 52% in 2004 (CPVI=D+2). With the retirement of longtime U.S. Senator Pete Domenici, Wilson ran and lost as a candidate for the U.S. Senate. The Democratic nominee is Martin Heinrich (former Albuquerque City Councilor). The Republican nominee is Bernalillo County Sheriff Darren White.
  • : Republican incumbent Steve Pearce won his party's nomination over Heather Wilson for the U.S. Senate. This district, covering roughly southeastern New Mexico, is usually Republican-voting, but Democrats sometimes win elections here. The Democratic nominee is Hobbs businessman, civic leader, and former Lea County Commissioner Harry Teague. Bush won here with 58% to 42% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+6). The Republican nominee is restaurateur Ed Tinsley,.
  • : Democratic incumbent Tom Udall has won his party's nomination for Pete Domenici's open U.S. Senate seat,. The race to fill Udall's House seat could become competitive under certain circumstances, but the Democrats would have the advantage: John Kerry won 54% here (CPVI=D+6). The Democratic nominee is State Public Regulation Commissioner Ben R. Lujan. Lujan's father serves as Speaker of the state House of Representatives. The Republican nominee is small business owner Dan East. Carol Miller a 1997/1998 Green Party candidate is seeking the seat as an independent.

New York

  • New York's 13th congressional district: This Staten Island district is by far the most conservative part of New York City, but it still votes for Democrats in many elections. Republican incumbent Vito Fossella has won by solid margins since first being elected in a 1997 special election. But he was recently arrested on drunk driving charges, which led to the revelation that he had an illegitimate child by a mistress. On May 20, 2008, Fossella announced he would not seek another term, giving ample time for others to decide to run by the September primary. Wall Street executive Francis H. Powers was a Republican candidate until he died on June 22, 2008. Staten Island City Councilman Mike McMahon is the Democratic nominee. Former Assemblyman Bob Straniere of New Dorp is the Republican nominee.
  • New York's 19th congressional district: Populist soft rock singer John Hall (D) won a major upset by some 6,000 votes in 2006, defeating long time incumbent Sue Kelly (R) in this historically Republican district by 51% to 49%. George W. Bush won this district in the Hudson Valley that is home to West Point with 53% of the vote to 45% of the vote for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=R+1). Republicans thought they had an excellent chance at unseating Hall with the candidacy of Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board Chairman Andrew Saul, a wealthy businessman who had outraised Hall during the second quarter of 2007. Saul, later dropped out of the race in November 2007. Westchester County Legislator George Oros announced that he would be a candidate, and noted his history of winning elections in a Democratic-leaning constituency since 1995, Oros dropped out of the race on June 4, 2008. Iraq War veteran Kieran Lalor, a conservative and strong proponent of the war in Iraq,is the presumptive Republican nominee. On May 22, 2008, Republican delegates from each of the five counties represented in the 19th district met in Mahopac, New York to endorse a candidate, and chose candidate Lalor. The NRCC has had difficulty recruiting a top-tier candidate for this historically Republican district.
  • : Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand defeated Republican incumbent John Sweeney in 2006 by 53% to 47%, the same margin with which George W. Bush won this district, which includes the north Hudson Valley and Saratoga Springs, in 2004 (CPVI=R+3). Republicans have identified Gillibrand as a top target for 2008, as they believe that Sweeney's personal issues caused his defeat, not a change in voter behavior in this traditional GOP stronghold. Also, Gillibrand's victory was the 15th Democratic pickup that resulted in the Democrats' takeover of the House, as her party needed 15 seats to take over. Former Secretary of State New York Alexander Treadwell, who also served as Chairman of the state GOP, is the Republican nominee. Gillibrand has raised over half a million dollars so far for her re-election, a total matched by Treadwell, who will have a difficult campaign ahead of him to stand out amongst a crowded field. Matt Funicello of the Green Party has also filed to run.
  • : Incumbent Mike McNulty (D) announced in October 2007 that he is retiring after 10 terms. This predominately urban district includes the cities of Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Amsterdam, Green Island, Gloversville and Johnstown. John Kerry won by 54% to 44% here in 2004 (CPVI=D+8). In something of a surprise, Former state Assemblyman Paul Tonko won the Democratic primary over Tracy Brooks, a former top aide to U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton. Schenectady County Legislator Jim Buhrmaster, a businessman from Scotia, is the Republican nominee.
  • : Mike Arcuri (D) won his first term with 54% of the vote in a marginal but Democratic-trending district which includes Utica. The district gave George W. Bush 50% of the vote in 2000 and 52% of the vote in 2004 (CPVI=R+1). Contractor Richard Hanna is the Republican nominee.
  • : Incumbent Jim Walsh (R) won by 51% to 49% in 2006 in this district that includes Syracuse. On January 23, 2008, The Politico reported that Walsh would not seek re-election. Walsh's 2006 opponent, Dan Maffei (D) is the Democratic nominee. Former Onondaga County Legislature Chairman Dale Sweetland, who is endorsed by Jim Walsh, is the Republican nominee, with his major opponents leaving the race. Also running is frequent candidate Howie Hawkins, using the "Green Populist" label. John Kerry won 53% here in 2004 (CPVI=D+3).
  • : Tom Reynolds (R), the head of the National Republican Congressional Committee and a key player in the Mark Foley scandal, won by 52% to 48% in 2006. His challenger, frequent candidate Jack Davis, was not considered an especially strong opponent. This historically Republican district, nestled in the wealthy suburbs of Buffalo and Rochester, gave George W. Bush 55% of the vote (CPVI=R+3); however Reynolds has decided to retire in 2008 after nearly losing in 2006. Millionaire businessman Chris J. Lee is the Republican nominee. In an upset Buffalo attorney Alice Kryzan is the Democratic nominee, winning a three-candidate primary with 41% of the vote.
  • New York's 29th congressional district: Randy Kuhl (R) had a close race in 2006, surviving a challenge from Eric Massa (D) by a 52% to 48% margin. His Elmira and suburban Rochester district gave Bush 56% in 2004 (CPVI=R+5). Kuhl is running for re-election. Massa is again the Democratic nominee. Despite his district being the most Republican in New York, Kuhl has had multiple difficult re-elections in the past.

North Carolina

  • : Republican Robin Hayes barely hung on in his 2006 re-election bid against Democrat Larry Kissell by a 329-vote margin. This seat likely will be competitive again in 2008 because of Hayes' vote for CAFTA, which he first opposed but voted for because of pressure from House Republican leaders. Kissell has already declared his candidacy for the 2008 race, and his most well-known potential opponent, state Rep. Rick Glazier, opted not to run. Bush carried this district by a 10-point margin in 2004 (55% for Bush to 45% for John Kerry).
  • : Incumbent Republican Patrick McHenry is the favorite to win the general election in this heavily Republican district. McHenry defeated retired Air Force Lt. Col. Lance Sigmon in the primary. Decorated Navy Veteran Daniel Johnson raised $123,000 during the fourth quarter of 2007 and has since been nominated by the Democratic party. A wild card is an attempted independent run by Constitution Party-supported Bryan Greene of Lenoir, NC. It is unclear what effect, if any, the indictment of a former McHenry campaign aide for election fraud will have. In 2006, McHenry defeated Democrat Richard Carsner by a smaller margin than the margin in his 2004 win.

North Dakota

North Dakota's sole Congressman, Democrat Earl Pomeroy, is expected to be easily reelected over minimal Republican opposition.

Ohio

  • : Republican Steve Chabot won by 52% to 48% in 2006, compared to 60% to 40% in 2004. His district barely went to George W. Bush with 50% to 49% for John Kerry in 2004 and includes the western portion of the Cincinnati area. State House Democratic Whip Steve Driehaus is the Democratic nominee. Driehaus' FEC report at the end of the second quarter of 2007 showed contributions from political committees linked to a large number of national leaders of the Democratic Party.
  • : Republican Jean Schmidt barely held on by a 51% to 49% margin against Democratic physician Victoria Wulsin. Her district is a heavily Republican one, covering the eastern portions of Greater Cincinnati, but she has never had an easy primary or general election. This year, she defeated state Representative Tom Brinkman in the Republican primary by a margin of 57% to 40%. Wulsin is running again in 2008. Bush won 64% here in 2004
  • : Republican Dave Hobson will retire at the age of 71. Hobson's district stretches from Springfield in the Dayton area eastward to several outer southern areas of Columbus. Bush won 57% here. The Democratic nominee is business attorney Sharen Neuhardt. State Senator Steve Austria is the Republican nominee and has Hobson's support.
  • : Incumbent Democrat Stephanie Tubbs Jones died of an aneurysm on August 20. Local Democrats will nominate a candidate to fill the vacancy on the general election ballot, as Tubbs Jones had already won the Democratic nomination. The district contains most of downtown and eastern Cleveland and many of the eastern suburbs in Cuyahoga County, including Euclid, South Euclid, Cleveland Heights, and Shaker Heights. The Republican candidate is Thomas Pekarek. John Kerry won 81% of the vote in this district. (The district will also hold a special election November 18, 2008 to fill Jones's seat for the short remainder of the 110th Congress.) The Democratic nominee is Warrensville Heights Mayor Marcia L. Fudge, who was once Tubbs Jones's Chief of Staff.

  • : Republican Steve LaTourette, whose district is centered around the eastern suburbs of Cleveland, won 58% of the vote in 2006 against an underfunded opponent. He represents a swing district where no party has a clear advantage over the other. Bush won here with 52% to 47% for John Kerry. State Appeals Court Judge William O'Neill won the Democratic nomination.
  • : Republican Deborah Pryce survived the toughest race of her career against Democratic Franklin County Commissioner Mary Jo Kilroy by 1,062 votes. Pryce is not running for re-election in 2008. Kilroy is again the Democratic nominee. Republican state Senator and Iraq War veteran Steve Stivers is the Republican nominee, winning his party's primary with 65%. George W. Bush barely won here in 2004 with 50.3% to 49.7% for John Kerry. A September 22 poll shows Pryce with a slim 47% to 42% lead over Stivers.
  • : Republican Congressman Ralph Regula, whose district includes the Canton area, will retire after 36 years in Congress cleveland.com State Senator Kirk Schuring won a close Republican primary and faces Democratic state Senator/Iraq War veteran John Boccieri in the general election. This district went for Bush with 53% to 46% for Kerry in 2004. A September 24 poll shows Boccieri pulling ahead of Shuring by a 49% to 41% margin, helped by some gaffes that Shuring has made during the campaign.
  • : Democrat Zack Space may be vulnerable in 2008 as his district, located in southeastern Ohio, went to George W. Bush with 57% to 43% for John Kerry in 2004, although Space won his first term in 2006 with 62% of the vote. Republicans were forced to select a new candidate — state Senator Joy Padgett — after Rep. Bob Ney dropped out of the race following his conviction in the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal. It turned out that Padgett had financial controversies of her own, and local voters were in no mood to tolerate more scandal. The Republican nominee is former state Agriculture Director Fred Dailey, who won a four-candidate primary with 39%.

Oklahoma

All five seats are considered 'Safe' for their Republican (4) or Democratic (1) incumbents.

Oregon

  • : Democrat Darlene Hooley announced February 7, 2008 that she will not seek re-election. This district will be competitive given that, in this Willamette Valley district, George W. Bush took 50% to 49% for John Kerry in 2004 (CPVI=D+1). Hooley was re-elected in 2006 with 54% to her closest opponent's 43%. Hooley's 2006 Republican opponent, businessman Mike Erickson, narrowly defeated former state Representative and gubernatorial candidate Kevin Mannix in the Republican primary by a 48% to 46% margin. Among Democrats, Kurt Schrader, an Oregon State Senator from Canby, defeated several candidates to win his party's nomination. Alex Polikoff of the Pacific Green Party has also announced his candidacy for the general election.

Pennsylvania

  • : Phil English (R) could have a test in 2008, as he represents an Erie-based district that gave George W. Bush 53% of the vote and 47% of its vote to John Kerry in 2004. Also, in 2006, English received 54% of the vote against a political newcomer with no political experience. Despite the presence of solidly Democratic Erie, only two Democrats have represented the district and its predecessors since 1893, and the district has historically been friendly to moderate Republicans. Civic Leader, Erie Arboretum director, and businesswoman Kathy Dahlkemper is the Democratic candidate.
  • : Jason Altmire (D) defeated incumbent Melissa Hart (R) in a 52% to 48% upset, as Hart had won 63% of the vote in 2004, when George W. Bush carried this suburban Pittsburgh district with 53% to 45% for John Kerry. In 2006, Pennsylvania was perhaps the most disastrous state for incumbent GOP House members, who lost four seats here. Hart has announced she will run again and Republicans have high hopes for her campaign. Her campaign released a poll which shows Altmire leading by a 49% to 44% margin.
  • : Incumbent John E. Peterson (R) is retiring. Pennsylvania's fifth district is currently the largest of all of Pennsylvania's congressional districts. It contains a large portion of north-central Pennsylvania. Bush won 61% of the vote here in 2004. The Republican nominee is Centre County Republican Committee Chairman Glenn "G.T." Thompson. The Democratic nominee is Clearfield County Commissioner Mark B. McCracken. Donald Wilson of the Green Party is also running.
  • : Jim Gerlach (R) survived threats from wealthy attorney Lois Murphy in 2004 and 2006 with 51% each year and could face another for his suburban Philadelphia district in 2008, which went to John Kerry with 51% in 2004. The Democratic nominee is former businessman Bob Roggio.
  • : This Bucks County district voted for John Kerry with 51% in 2004 and was narrowly won by Democrat Pat Murphy in 2006, when Murphy unseated one-term Mike Fitzpatrick (R) by 1,521 votes. Fitzpatrick has ruled out running for his old seat after announcing he would be running for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Pharmaceutical executive and U.S. Marines Colonel Tom Manion, the father of a slain Iraq War soldier is the Republican candidate.
  • : Chris Carney (D) may face a difficult re-election bid in this district that he won after widely-publicized allegations of incumbent Republican Don Sherwood’s extramarital affair with and alleged abuse of Cynthia Ore, who later settled for an undisclosed amount. Carney defeated Sherwood 53% to 47%. However, the district has a considerable Republican tilt. Chris Hackett, a successful CPA, is the Republican nominee. Hackett defeated Dan Meuser, the head of Pride Mobility in the April 22 Republican primary. Meuser was embarrassed when it was revealed that his business was fined for employing illegal aliens in 1997. Bush won here 60% to 40%.
  • : Incumbent Paul Kanjorski (D) has seldom had difficulty at the polls, but this year could be different. He faces a challenge from Hazleton Mayor Lou Barletta. Barletta ran against Kanjorski in 2002, losing by 14 points, but then he was not widely known and was heavily outspent. Now, he's a nationally recognized opponent of illegal immigration, which gives him name recognition and a potential fundraising base he didn't have before. A mid-September poll by Franklin & Marshall College shows Barletta pulling ahead of Kanjorski by a 44% to 35% margin.
  • : Charlie Dent (R) could face a tough race in 2008. He won 53% of the vote against a political newcomer with no political experience in a district that narrowly went to John Kerry with 50% in 2004. His district covers the Lehigh Valley region and is politically marginal. Allentown Democratic Party chairwoman Sam Bennett is the Democratic nominee.
  • : Tim Murphy (R) was re-elected in 2006 with 58% of the vote against a little-known Democrat in this suburban Pittsburgh district that George W. Bush won here with 54% to 46% for John Kerry in 2004, an indication that Murphy could be vulnerable against a stronger opponent. The Democratic nominee is self-funding businessman Steve O'Donnell.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island's two Congressmen (both Democrats) are facing minimal opposition in their reelection bids.

South Carolina

None of South Carolina's six Congressmen (four Republicans and two Democrats) face serious opposition in their reelection bids.

South Dakota

South Dakota's sole Congressman, Democrat Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, is expected to be reelected over minimal Republican opposition.

Tennessee

  • : Freshman Republican incumbent David Davis was narrowly defeated for renomination by Johnson City Mayor Phil Roe by a margin of 50% to 49% (only 500 votes). Davis was elected in 2006, succeeding retiring congressman Bill Jenkins, winning the Republican nomination over a crowded field which included Roe. Roe, a retired OB/GYN, was endorsed by several local newspapers, refused PAC or special interest money and promises not to serve any more then ten years in Congress. Roe should easily win in this district, which has only elected Republicans since 1880. The Democratic nominee is Rob Russell, a teacher at East Tennessee State University.

Texas

  • : This seat was vacated by former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, who resigned amid reports over his campaign finance activities. Democrat Nick Lampson won the general election, facing only a Libertarian and write-in opposition from Republicans. Republican Shelley Sekula-Gibbs, a dermatologist and former Houston City Councilwoman, won the special election held on the same day and in which Lampson did not run, and she served as a member of congress for almost two months before Lampson was sworn in. Lampson is running for re-election but is expected to face a difficult race in 2008, as he represents a heavily Republican constituency that voted for George W. Bush over John Kerry by a 2 to 1 (66% to 33%) margin (CPVI=R+15), more than any other district that fell to the Democrats in 2006. In an added development, Lampson has had serious health problems, including recent quadruple heart bypass surgery. The district takes in several wealthy and conservative suburbs south of Houston, including Sugar Land, Pasadena, Pearland, and the Clear Lake area of Houston. This district also includes the NASA Johnson Space Center and Ellington Field. Lampson won the Democrat nomination. The Republican nominee is Pete Olson, who defeated Sekula-Gibbs in a primary runoff. Libertarian John Wieder and Joel West of the Green Party are also running
  • : Former Democratic Representative Ciro Rodriguez won a 54% to 46% victory in a runoff against Republican incumbent Henry Bonilla on December 12, 2006. Rodriguez was aided by low turnout, especially in the conservative areas of the district. His seat is a natural target for Republicans in 2008. The district, which is a majority Hispanic one to the south and west of downtown San Antonio, stretching across West Texas into Del Rio and other towns along the Mexican border and Big Bend National Park, reaching all the way to just east of El Paso, is politically marginal. Bexar County Commissioner Lyle Larson won the Republican primary by a 63% to 37% margin, larger than expected. Libertarian Lani Connolly is also running.

Utah

  • : In 2006, Republican incumbent Chris Cannon survived a diffucult Republican primary against businessman John Jacob, who vigorously attacked Cannon's support of amnesty for illegal aliens. Cannon won 56% due mainly to Jacob's last-minute errors. Jacob is not running again in 2008. At the 2008 Utah State Convention, one of Cannon's primary challengers, gubernatorial chief of staff Jason Chaffetz, defeated Cannon, but did not receive a supermajority of the vote thus Cannon and Chaffetz faced off in a runoff primary on June 24, 2008. Juab County Prosecutor David Leavitt, another Republican challenger who came in third place at the convention, endorsed Cannon. Chaffetz defeated Cannon in the primary by a margin of 20%. Chaffetz is heavily favored over Democratic nominee Bennion L. Spencer in November.

Vermont

Vermont's sole Congressman, Democrat Peter Welch, faces no Republican opponent in his reelection bid, having won the Republican nomination himself due to write-in votes.

Virginia

  • : Republican Thelma Drake is being challenged by Democrat Glenn Nye, a former diplomat. In 2006, Drake survived a bid from Democrat Phil Kellam by only 51.3% to 48.5%. In 2004, Drake received 55% of the vote in this Virginia Beach-based district, which was won by George W. Bush with 57% to 42% for John Kerry in 2004, but in 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 50% to 47% in his gubernatorial election. In 2006 Drake may have been hurt by the downfall of Republican U.S. Senator George Allen, who narrowly lost to Democrat Jim Webb, an former Republican and former Secretary of the Navy under Ronald Reagan. CQ Politics rates the seat "Republican favored". The Cook Political Report rates it "Likely Republican". The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) names Drake a "targeted Republican".
  • : Although still considered "safe Republican" to "likely Republican", Democratic nominee Tom Perriello has been raising considerable funds to campaign against the Republican incumbent, Virgil Goode. A recent poll by Survey USA shows Goode leading by 55% to 42%
  • : Republican incumbent Frank Wolf could face a tough race. The Democratic nominee is Judy Feder, Professor of Public Policy at Georgetown University and former Dean of their Georgetown Public Policy Institute. In 2004 George W. Bush won 55% of this district, which covers Loudoun, Prince William and part of Fairfax counties, as well as Manassas. Wolf defeated Feder in 2006, 57%–41%. That year Democrat Webb won the district 50.0%–48.8% in his Senate race. In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 50% to 46% in his gubernatorial race. CQ Politics rates seat "safe Republican". The DCCC names Wolf a "targeted Republican".
  • : Retiring Republican incumbent Tom Davis toppled one-term Democrat Leslie Byrne in 1994 and rarely faced serious opposition in subsequent years. However, his district, located in the wealthy Northern Virginia suburbs of Washington, DC, has become increasingly Democratic over the years. Now it will definitely be a top Democratic target, given Davis's January 30, 2008, announcement that he will not seek re-election. George W. Bush barely won this district with 50% to 49% for John Kerry, which includes part of Fairfax and Prince William counties, in 2004. The Republican nominee is Keith Fimian, business magnate and former CPA, with personal wealth he is drawing upon. The Democratic nominee is Gerry Connolly, Chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. CQ Politics rates seat "leans Democratic". The Cook Political Report rates it "lean Democratic". The Rothenberg Political Report scores it "leans Democratic".

Washington

  • : Dave Reichert (R) won a close 51% to 49% re-election bid against Democratic former Microsoft product manager Darcy Burner in 2006. Burner has declared her intention to run against Reichert in 2008. Al Gore and John Kerry narrowly won this suburban Seattle district with 52% in 2000 and 2004, respectively. State Senator Rodney Tom, who announced his candidacy, dropped out of the race in 2008 and endorsed Burner. This race will be a top priority for both parties. Burner has received nationwide attention for her work on the Responsible Plan to End the War in Iraq, and is considered a leader among anti-war Democrats.

West Virginia

  • : In 2006, incumbent Shelley Moore Capito (R) was re-elected with 57%, a solid margin, but not a sign of political security. She faced a potentially difficult challenge from state Sen. John Unger (D), but Unger surprised many when he dropped out of the race. The DCCC had called this race "a top target," and insist that it is still winnable. The Democratic nominee is Anne Barth, a longtime former aide to U.S. Sen. Robert Byrd. Bush won 57% here in 2004.

Wisconsin

  • : Steve Kagen (D) won by a 51% to 49% margin his first term in this Republican-leaning district that went fairly easily to President George W. Bush with 55% to 45% for John Kerry in 2004. Kagen will likely face a serious threat from Republicans, who had held this seat since 1999. He recently garnered bad press when he bragged about speaking rudely to the President and First Lady at a White House function and then retracted this claim. He was the subject of controversy when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated his clinic for selling allergy vaccines without a valid license, although his clinic stopped the practice. Kagen's predecessor, Mark Green, who ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2006, has been nominated by Bush to be Ambassador to Tanzania, ruling out his running. His Republican opponent, as in 2006, will be former state Assembly Speaker John Gard.

Wyoming

  • : Six-term Barbara Cubin (R) is retiring. She had beaten her Democratic opponent, Teton County School Board Chairman Gary Trauner, by only 1,012 votes in 2006. She sought re-election in a district – coterminous with the state of Wyoming – that gave George W. Bush an overwhelming margin of 69% in 2004 but whose governor, Dave Freudenthal (D), was re-elected with 70% of the vote in 2006. Several controversies had plagued Cubin leading her to retire from Congress. Gary Trauner is once again the Democratic nominee. Former state Treasurer Cynthia Lummis defeated well funded rancher Mark Gordon for the Republican nomination after state House Majority leader Colin M. Simpson dropped out of the primary race.

Races of non-voting members

United States House of Representatives elections for Delgates from the American Samoa, the District of Columbia, Guam and the United States Virgin Islands are expected to be noncompetitive this cycle. All incumbents running from these At-large districts are expected to be returned to office. The real races will come from just two contests: the Northern Mariana Islands, which are electing their first Delegate to the U.S. House in history, and Puerto Rico.

Northern Mariana Islands

Puerto Rico

  • : 1-term Resident Commissioner (same as non-voting territorial delegate) Luis Fortuño (NPP/R) is retiring from his House seat to run for Governor of Puerto Rico. Former PR Secretary of Justice Pedro Pierluisi (NPP/D) is the favorite to succeed Fortuño over economist Alfredo Salazar (PDP/D), but regardless of which of the two men win, the seat is switching from Republican to Democratic hands in January. However, this seat will not impact which party controls the chamber.

See also

References

External links

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