Presidential_Unit_Citation_(United_States)

Presidential Unit Citation (United States)

Please see "Presidential Unit Citation" for other nations' versions of this award
The Presidential Unit Citation is awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and allies for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy on or after 7 December 1941 (the date of the Attack on Pearl Harbor and the start of American involvement in World War II). The unit must display such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions so as to set it apart from and above other units participating in the same campaign. The degree of heroism required is the same as that which would warrant award of the Distinguished Service Cross, Air Force Cross or Navy Cross to an individual.

Army and Air Force

The Army citation was established as the Distinguished Unit Citation on 26 February 1942, and received its present name on 3 November 1966. All members of the unit may wear the decoration, whether or not they personally participated in the acts for which the unit was cited. Only those assigned to the unit at the time of the action cited may wear the decoration as a permanent award. For the Army and Air Force, the emblem itself is a solid blue ribbon enclosed in a gold frame. As with other citation decorations, the Army's is in a larger frame that is worn above the right pocket. The Citation is carried on the unit's regimental colours in the form of a blue streamer, four feet long and 2 3/4 inches wide.

Navy and Marine

The Navy citation is the unit equivalent of a Navy Cross and was established on 6 February 1942.

The Navy version has blue, yellow, and red horizontal stripes. To distinguish between the two versions of the Presidential Unit Citation, the Navy version is typically referred to as the Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation while the Army and Air Force refer to the decoration simply as the Presidential Unit Citation. These are only worn by persons who meet the criteria at the time it is awarded to the unit. Unlike the Army, those who later join the unit do not wear it on a temporary basis.

Special Clasps

USS Nautilus (SSN-571)

To commemorate the first submerged voyage under the North Pole by the nuclear-powered submarine Nautilus in 1958, all members of her crew who made that voyage were authorized to wear their Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with a special clasp in the form of a gold block letter N. (see image below)




USS Triton (SSRN-586)

To commemorate the first submerged circumnavigation of the world by the nuclear-powered submarine Triton during its shakedown cruise in 1960, all members of her crew who made that voyage were authorized to wear their Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with a special clasp in the form of a golden replica of the globe. (see image below)




USS Parche (SSN-683)

The most decorated unit in U.S. Navy history was the nuclear-powered submarine Parche, with a total of nine PUCs awarded during its 30 years of service.

Coast Guard

United States Coast Guard units may be awarded either the Navy or Coast Guard version of the Presidential Unit Citation, depending on which service the Coast Guard was supporting when the citation action was performed.

A Coast Guard version of the award was awarded to the entire U.S. Coast Guard, including the Coast Guard Auxiliary, by President George W. Bush for Hurricane Katrina rescue and relief operations. All Coast Guard members who received the award are authorized to wear the Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with a special clasp in the form of the internationally recognized “hurricane symbol”


Recipients

World War II

U.S. Army

U.S. Army Air Force

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
101st Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 Normandy Division and 1st Brigade only
101st Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 Battle of Bastogne Division and 1st Brigade only
26th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1945 Ardennes-Alsace
70th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1945 Wingen 2nd Battalion, 274th Infantry Regiment only
Combat Command "B", 7th Armored Division U.S. Army 1948 St. Vith (Ardennes Campaign) Dept. of the Army GO #48, dated 12 July 1948: "Combat Command B. 7th Armored Division, composed of the following units: Headquarters and Headquarters Company; 17th Tank Battalion; 31st Tank Battalion; 23d Armored Infantry Battalion; 38th Armored Infantry Battalion; 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron Mechanized (less Troop D); 275th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; 434th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; 965th Field Artillery Battalion; 168th Engineer Combat Battalion; 1st Platoon, Company F, 423d Infantry Regiment (amended from 3rd Platoon in Defense Department Permanent Order #032-01, dated 1 Feb 1999); Company B, 33d Armored Engineer Battalion; and Company A, 814th Tank Destroyer Battalion (SP), is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action from 17 to 23 December 1944, inclusive, at St. Vith, Belgium. Combat Command B, 7th Armored Division, was subjected to repeated tank and infantry attacks, which grew in intensity as the German forces attempted to destroy the stubborn defenses that were denying to them the use of the key communication center at St. Vith. By the second day, the flanks were constantly threatened by enemy forces that had bypassed the St. Vith area and pushed far to the rear in an effort to encircle the command east of the Salm River. The attacking forces were repeatedly thrown back by the gallant troops who rose from their fox holes and fought in fierce hand to hand combat to stop the penetrations and inflict heavy losses on the numerically superior foe. As the command continued to deny the important St. Vith highway and railroad center to the Germans, the entire offensive lost its initial impetus and their supply columns became immobilized. By 21 December, the German timetable was so disrupted that the enemy was forced to divert a corps to the capture of St. Vith. Under extreme pressure from overwhelming forces, this command, which for 6 days had held the St. Vith area so gallantly, was ordered to withdraw west of the Salm River. By their epic stand, without prepared defenses and despite heavy casualties, Combat Command B,. 7th Armored Division inflicted crippling losses and imposed great delay upon the enemy by a masterful and grimly determined defense in keeping with the highest traditions of the Army of the United States."
761st Tank Battalion U.S. Army 1978 ETO, WW II
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Guadalcanal Army citation
695th Armored Field Artillery Battalion U.S. Army 1945 Invasion behind enemy lines and capture of the French city Metz.
34th Field Artillery US Army 1943 North Africa
51st Combat Engineer Battalion US Army 1945 Ardennes Defense of several key Belgian cities against Kampfgruppe Peiper between December 17-22, 1944.
82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment -- D-Day - Normandy - Sainte-Mère-Église
82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment -- Operation Market Garden - Groesbeek, Holland
96th Infantry Division U.S. Army 2001 Okinawa Entire Division
44th Infantry Division, 2nd Battalion U.S. Army 1945 France 2nd Battalion and one platoon of Company A, 749th Tank Battalion and one platoon of Company A, 776th Tank Destroyer Battalion. Defensive action starting on December 31, 1944 against the German offensive Operation Nordwind in Rimling France.
82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1945 503rd Parachute Infantry -- Liberation the island of Corregidor in Manila Bay, in 1945.
222nd Infantry Regiment U.S. Army 2001 Alsace 24 & 25 January 1945 withstood repeated attacks from three enemy divisions
Third Platoon, Company C 614th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. Army 1945 Alsace 14 December 1944 Set up their guns in full view of the enemy, acting as a decoy so other units could attack and take the town of Climback, France
5307th Composite Unit ("Merrill's Marauders") U.S. Army 1966 northern Burma
601st Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. Army 1942 Battle of El Guettar 23 March 1942 broke up an attack by strong elements of the 10th Panzer Division, destroying 37 tanks and receiving the Presidential Unit Citation. This has the interesting distinction of being the only time a battalion would fight in the way envisaged by the original "tank destroyer" concept, as an organized independent unit opposing an armored force in open terrain. Received a second Presidential Unit Citation for heavy action in the Colmar Pocket, destroying 18 tanks.
351st Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion U.S. Army 1944 9 July to 13 July 1944 - Five days of heavy combat; 425 prisoners taken; 250 enemy killed or wounded.
100th Infantry Battalion (Separate) U.S. Army 1944 Belvedere and Sassetta, Italy War Department General Orders 66, 15 August 1944: 26 and 27 June 1944 - The stubborn desire of the men to close with a numerically superior enemy and the rapidity with which they fought enabled the 100th Infantry Battalion to destroy completely the right flank positions of a German army, killing at least 178 Germans, wounding approximately 20, capturing 73, and forcing the remainder of a completely disrupted battalion to surrender approximately 10 kilometers of ground. In addition, large quantities of enemy weapons, vehicles, and equipment were either captured or destroyed.
100th Infantry Battalion, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944 Bruyeres, Biffontaine, and in the Foret Domaniale de Champ, France War Department General Orders 78, 12 September 1945: 15 to 30 October 1944 - The 100th Battalion was again committed to the attack. Going to the rescue of the "lost battalion,'' 141st Infantry Regiment, it fought without respite for 4 days against a fanatical enemy that was determined to keep the "lost battalion" isolated and force its surrender. On the fourth day, although exhausted and reduced through casualties to about half its normal strength, the battalion fought doggedly forward against strong enemy small-arms and mortar fire until it contacted the isolated unit.
442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1945 Serravezza, Carrara, and Fosdinovo, Italy War Department General Orders 34, 10 April 1946, as amended by War Department General Orders 106, 20 September 1946: 5 to 14 April 1945 - It accomplished the mission of creating a diversion along the Ligurian Coast, which served as a feint for the subsequent break-through of the Fifth Army forces into Bologna and the Po Valley. The successful accomplishment of this mission turned a diversionary action into a full scale and victorious offensive, which played an important part in the dual destruction of the German armies In Italy.
2d Battalion, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944-5 Bruyeres, France; Biffontaine, France; and Massa, Italy War Department General Orders 83, 6 August 1946: 19 October 1944, 28 and 29 October 1944, 6 to 10 April 1945 - The 2d Battalion executed a brilliant tactical operation in capturing Hill 503, to expedite the forward movement beyond Bruyeres, France and to erase the German threat from the rear. On 28 October 1944, the 2d Battalion secured its objective in a 2-day operation, which eliminated a threat to the flanks of two American divisions. In the face of intense enemy barrages and numerous counterattacks, the infantrymen of this battalion fought their way through difficult jungle-like terrain in freezing weather and completely encircled the enemy. Maintaining its admirable record of achievement in the vicinity of Massa, Italy the 2d Battalion smashed through and exploited the strong Green Line on the Ligurian Coast. Surging over formidable heights through strong resistance, the 2d Battalion, in 5 days of continuous, heavy fighting, captured a series of objectives to pave the way for the entry into the important communications centers of Massa and Carrara, Italy, without opposition. In this operation, the 2d Battalion accounted for more than 200 Germans and captured or destroyed large quantities of enemy materiel.
3d Battalion, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944 Biffontaine France War Department General Orders 68, 14 August 1945: 27 to 30 October 1944 - One of the battalions of another unit which had been advancing deep into enemy territory beyond the town of Biffontaine was suddenly surrounded by the enemy, and separated from all friendly units by an enemy force estimated at 700 men. The mission of the 3id Battalion was to attack abreast with the 100th Battalion and four other battalions and relieve the entrapped unit. Though seriously depleted in manpower, the battalion hurled back two determined enemy counterattacks, and after reducing a heavily mined roadblock finally established contact with the besieged battalion.
Companies F and L, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944 Belmont, France War Department General Orders 14, 4 March 1945: 21 October 1944 - Companies F and L, 442d Regimental Combat Team, designated the O'Connor Task Force, launched an attack down the north slope of the wooded ridge, Foret de Belmont. In destroying the enemy main line of resistance and advancing the divisional front lines by approximately 2,000 meters, the task force captured 56 prisoners, killed 80 of the enemy, and captured considerable quantifies of enemy materiel and equipment.
232d Engineer Combat Company (then attached to the 111th Engineer Combat Battalion) U.S. Army 1944 Bruyeres, France War Department General Orders 56, 17 June 1946: 23 October to 11 November 1944 - Even though the engineers sustained 57 casualties in dead and wounded, they captured 27 German prisoners and killed many more as they worked. Almost continuous rain and snow made their task more difficult, and yet by sheer determination and grit, these men accomplished this magnificent feat of engineering. Without this road, the division operation could not have succeeded and it is due to the extraordinary achievement of the 11th Engineer Combat Battalion with the 232d Engineer Combat Company (attached) that the 36th Division was able to outflank the enemy forces in the Laveline-Corcieux Valley and pursue a disorganized enemy to the banks of the Meurthe River.
Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
3d Fighter Group, Fourteenth Air Force U.S. Army 1945 Mission "A", China
2d Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1944 24 February 1944 Mission 150 to Steyr, Austria
2d Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1944 25 February 1944 Mission 151 to Regensburg, Germany. Marks the only time in U.S. military aviation history that a unit is awarded back to back citations for actions on successive days.
Task Force K-bar 2002 Afghanistan

U.S. Navy

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
USS Alchiba (AKA-6) U.S. Navy 1943 Guadalcanal Campaign Navy Citation, for service at Guadalcanal from August through December 1942: "The vessel arrived off Guadalcanal on 7 August, disembarked her troops, unloaded her cargo, and left the Solomons two days later, bound for New Caledonia. Alchiba returned to Guadalcanal on 18 September. After unloading cargo to support marines struggling for that island, she sailed back to New Caledonia for more supplies and returned to Guadalcanal on 1 November. She was anchored off Lunga Point at 0616 on 28 November, when two torpedoes from the Japanese submarine 1-16 exploded on the vessel s port side. At that time, her hold was loaded with drums of gasoline and ammunition, and the resulting explosion shot flames in the air. The commanding officer ordered the ship to get underway to run her up on the beach. This action undoubtedly saved the ship. Hungry flames raged in the ship for over five days before weary fire fighting parties finally brought them under control. Salvage operations began soon thereafter. Most of her cargo was saved, and temporary repairs were in progress when Alchiba was torpedoed again on 7 December. An enemy submarine's conning tower had been spotted shortly before two torpedoes were fired. One passed close under the cargo ship's stern, but the other struck her port side near the engine room. The blast killed three men, wounded six others, and caused considerable structural damage. Once the fires and flooding were controlled, salvage operations resumed and enabled the ship to get underway for Tulagi on 27 December 1942." -- Dictionary of American Fighting Ships, Department of the Navy
USS Archerfish (SS-311) U.S. Navy 1944 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the UNITED STATES SHIP ARCHERFISH for service as set forth in the following CITATION: "For extraordinary heroism in action during the Fifth War Patrol against enemy Japanese combatant units in restricted waters of the Pacific. Relentless in tracking an alert and powerful hostile force which constituted a potential threat to our vital operations in the Philippine area, the U.S.S. ARCHERFISH culminated a dogged six and one-half-hour pursuit by closing her high speed target, daringly penetrated the strong destroyer escort screen, and struck fiercely at a large Japanese aircraft carrier (SHINANO) with all six of her torpedoes finding their mark to sink this extremely vital enemy ship. Subjected to devastating air and surface anti-submarine measures, the ARCHERFISH skillfully evaded her attackers by deep submergence and returned to port in safety. Handled with superb seamanship, she responded gallantly to the fighting determination of the officers and men and dealt a fatal blow to one of the enemy's major Fleet units despite the most merciless Japanese opposition and rendered valiant service toward the ultimate destruction of a crafty and fanatic enemy." For the President, /s/ James Forrestal Secretary of the Navy
USS Barb (SS-220) U.S. Navy 1945 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the UNITED STATES SHIP BARB for service as set forth in the following CITATION: "For extraordinary heroism in action during the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface forces in restricted waters of the Pacific. Persistent in her search for vital targets, the USS BARB relentlessly tracked down the enemy and struck with indomitable fury despite unfavorable attack opportunity and severe countermeasures. Handled superbly, she held undeviatingly to her aggressive course and, on contacting a concentration of hostile ships in the lower reaches of a harbor, boldly penetrated the formidable screen. Riding dangerously, surfaced, in shallow water, the BARB launched her torpedoes into the enemy group to score devastating hits on the major targets, thereafter retiring at high speed on the surface in a full hour's run through uncharted, heavily mined and rock obstructed waters. Inexorable in combat, the BARB also braved the perils of a topical typhoon to rescue fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who had survived the torpedoing and sinking of a hostile transport ship en route from Singapore to the Japanese Empire. Determined in carrying the fight to the enemy, the BARB has achieved an illustrious record of gallantry in action, reflecting the highest credit upon her valiant officers and men and upon the United States Naval Service."
USS Enterprise (CV-6) U.S. Navy 1943 Air raids on the Marshall Islands (1942), Doolittle Raid, Battle of Midway, Battle of the Eastern Solomons, Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, Guadalcanal Campaign Navy Citation, for 7 December 1941 to 15 November 1942. First aircraft carrier to received the PUC. Most decorated U.S. Navy ship from WWII.
USS Houston (CA-30) U.S. Navy 1942,
1944
Java Campaign, ending
with Second Battle of the Java Sea
Navy Citation... “(f)or action in the Battle of Sunda Strait. Sunk in action with HMAS Perth against incredible odds. The two ships steamed into a Japanese invasion force and were sunk in the ensuing battle.
USS Hugh W. Hadley U.S. Navy 1945 Battle of Okinawa USS Hugh W. Hadley (DD-774) "For extraordinary heroism in action as Fighter Direction Ship on Radar Picket Station Number 15 during an attack by approximately 100 enemy Japanese planes, forty miles northwest of the Okinawa Transport Area, May 11, 1945. Fighting valiantly against waves of hostile suicide and dive-bombing planes plunging toward her from all directions, the U.S.S. HUGH HADLEY sent up relentless barrages of antiaircraft fire during one of the most furious air-sea battles of the war. Repeatedly finding her targets, she destroyed twenty enemy planes, skillfully directed her Combat Air Patrol in shooting down at least forty others and, by her vigilance and superb battle readiness, avoided damage to herself until subjected to a coordinated attack by ten Japanese planes. Assisting in the destruction of all ten of these, she was crashed by one bomb and three suicide planes with devastating effect. With all engineering spaces flooded and with a fire raging amidships, the gallant officers and men of the HUGH W. HADLEY fought desperately against almost insurmountable odds and, by their indomitable determination, fortitude and skill, brought the damage under control, enabling their ship to be towed to port and saved. Her brilliant performance in this action reflects the highest credit upon the HUGH W. HADLEY and the United States Naval Service."
USS Pope (DD-225) U.S. Navy 1942,
1944
Java Campaign, ending
with Second Battle of the Java Sea
Navy Citation... “(f)or extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Java Campaign in the Southwest Pacific War Area, from January 23 to March 1, 1942...".
USS Trigger (SS-237) U.S. Navy 1943 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire Navy Citation, for fifth, sixth, and seventh war patrols - 30 April to 8 December 1943
Torpedo Squadron 8 (VT-8) U.S. Navy 1943 Battle of Midway For first combat mission, 4 June 1942
Mine Division 34 (Pacific Fleet) U.S. Navy 1945 Borneo USS Sentry (Flagship) -- Borneo Liberation Support
Task Unit 77.4.3 U.S. Navy 1944 Battle off Samar USS Aaron Ward (DD-34) "For extraordinary heroism in action as a Picket Ship on Radar Picket Station during a coordinated attack by approximately twenty-five Japanese aircraft near Okinawa on May 3, 1945. Shooting down two Kamikazes which approached in determined suicide dives, the U.S.S. AARON WARD was struck by a bomb from a third suicide plane as she fought to destroy this attacker before it crashed into her superstructure and sprayed the entire area with flaming gasoline. Instantly flooded in her after engineroom and fireroom, she battled against flames and exploding ammunition on deck and, maneuvering in a tight circle because of damage to her steering gear, countered another coordinated suicide attack and destroyed three Kamikazes in rapid succession. Still smoking heavily and maneuvering radically, she lost all power when her forward fireroom flooded under a seventh suicide plane which dropped a bomb close aboard and dived in flames into the main deck. Unable to recover from this blow before an eighth bomber crashed into her superstructure bulkhead only a few seconds later, she attempted to shoot down a ninth Kamikaze diving toward her at high speed and, despite the destruction of nearly all her gun mounts aft when this plane struck her, took under fire the tenth bomb-laden plane, which penetrated the dense smoke to crash on board with a devastating explosion. With fires raging uncontrolled, ammunition exploding and all engine spaces except the forward engineroom flooded as she settled in the water and listed to port, she began a nightlong battle to remain afloat and, with the assistance of a towing vessel, finally reached port the following morning. By her superb fighting spirit and the courage and determination of her entire company, the AARON WARD upheld the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

U.S. Marine Corps

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
3rd Marine Regiment US. Marine Corps Battle of Guam (1944) Navy citation
Marine Fighter Sq 214 U.S. Marine Corps 1944 the Black Sheep Squadron -- for their second combat tour, lasting 84 days at the end of 1943
Second Marine Division (reinforced), consisting of Division Headquarters, Special Troops (including Company C, 1st Corps Medium Tanks Battalion), Service Troops, 2nd, 6th, 8th 10th and 18th Regiments U.S. Marine Corps 1943 Battle of Tarawa Navy Citation... "For outstanding performance in combat during the seizure and occupation of the Japanese-held Atoll of Tarawa, Gilbert Islands, November 20 to 24, 1943."
1st Force Reconnaissance Company U.S. Marine Corps 1965-1968 Vietnam Awarded three citations (2 Bronze Stars present)

Korean War

Unit Servce Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
Co A, 5th Infantry & Secti 1, Machinegun Plt, Co D, 5th Infantry U.S. Army 1953 Songnae-dong Army citation
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Nam River Army citation
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Pakchon Army citation
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Wonju-Hwachon Navy citation
2nd Infantry Division U.S. Army 1951 Korean War
1st Battalion, 7th Infantry U.S. Army 1952 CHOKSONG Army citation
2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry U.S. Army 1952 KOWANG-NI Army citation
3d Battalion, 7th Infantry U.S. Army 1952 SEGOK March 1952 Department of the Army General Order 33: The 3d Battalion (second award for Company L only), 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, and the following attached units :3d Platoon, Medical Company, 7th Infantry Regiment; 1st Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 7th Infantry Regiment (second award) ; 2d Platoon, Heavy Tank Company, 7th Infantry Regiment; 3d Platoon, Heavy Tank Company, 7th Infantry Regiment (second award) ; Liaison Section 244,Headquartcrs Battery, 39th Field Artillery Battalion; Forward Observer Sections 1, 2, and 3, Battery B, 89th Field Artillery Battalion, are cited for outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism inaction against the enemy near Segok, Korea, during the period 30 June to 4 July 1951. On the evening of 30 June, the 3d Battalion and attached units commenced their assigned mission which was to attack and seize Hill 717, the commanding terrain feature of the Chorwon-Kumhwa-Pyonggang area. A previous attempt by a friendly battalion to secure this vital objective had been unsuccessful because of the numerical superiority of the enemy force. Advancing nearly over rugged and uncertain terrain in darkness, while continually under intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, artillery, and mortar fire, the battalion and attached units moved up the precipitous slopes and pressed the attack with such aggressiveness, determination, and skill that the enemy was forced to abandon carefully prepared entrenchments. Throughout the night of1 July, the hostile force savagely counterattacked, attempting to dislodge the battalion and attached units from their precarious positions on the slopes of Hill 717. On the morning of 2 July, the battalion and attached units resumed their assault against the enemy's fortified hill positions. Even though they had suffered severely from the previous night's engagement, these gallant units, imbued with a steadfast determination, continued to advance against vast numbers of the enemy, inflicting staggering losses on the hostile force. In order to supplement its seriously depleted force, the enemy was forced to commit additional reserves to prevent the seizure of this important hill by the friendly forces. The battle continued to rage throughout the night of 2 July, with the enemy force hurling its entire might against the 3d Battalion and attached units, repeatedly charging down on the friendly forces in suicidal waves. In the face of tremendous odds, the valiant members of these units engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat with such magnificent tenacity and courage that their positions remained intact and the enemy was repulsed with heavy casualties. The fierce battle went on until, late in the afternoon of 3 July, the stubbornly resisting hostile force was routed from its strongly defended hilltop emplacements. After repulsing several enemy counterattacks during the night, the positions of the friendly units were consolidated on 4 July. Throughout this heroic engagement, more than 1,500 casualties were inflicted on the hostile troops. The 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, and attached units displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing their mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in the action. The extraordinary heroism displayed by all members of these units reflects great credit on them selves and upholds the highest traditions of the military service. (General Orders 769, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, Korea, 15 October 1951.)
Battery C, 1st 4.5" Rocket Battalion U.S. Marine Corps Several Dates Korean War 15Sep-11Oct50, 21-26Apr51, 16May-30Jun51, 11-25Sep51
3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment. Australian Army April, 1951 Kapyong Army Citation
2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regiment Canadian Army April, 1951 Kapyong, Korean War
1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment British Army 1951 Battle of the Imjin River, Korean War
Belgian-Luxemburgian Battalion Belgian Army 1951 Battle of the Imjin River, Korean War
Troop C. 170th Independent Mortar Battery, Royal Artillery British Army 1951 Battle of the Imjin River, Korean War

Vietnam War

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
4th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1966 Battle of Dak To 1st Brigade only
101st Airborne Division U.S. Army Battle of Dak To 1st Brigade only
101st Airborne Division U.S. Army Battle of Dong Ap Bia Mountain 3rd Brigade Only
11th Armored Cavalry Regiment U.S. Army Hau Nghia-Binh Duong Tet Offensive near Saigon, Hq. Troop (1st Sqdn.), Troops A,B,C and Company D only
VO-67 U.S. Navy 2007 Vietnam War November 1967 to July 1968
MACV-SOG U.S. Army 2001 Vietnam War Special ForcesTop Secret status required decades to declassify (Studies and Observations Group)
1st Battalion, 5th Infantry, Army U.S. Army 1969 Ben Cui 18 August 1968 to 20 September 1968 The 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division and its attached units distinguished themselves by extraordinary heroism in combat operations against numerically superior enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam from 18 August to September 20 1968. During this period the 1st Battalion Task Force, through reconnaissance in force, ambush, counterambush, and reaction missions effectively destroyed a regimental size enemy force and prevented the enemy from seizing the initiative in it's "Third Offensive." The Officers and men of the Task Force displayed outstanding bravery, high morale, and exemplary esprit de corps in fierce hand-to-hand combat and counter offensive action against well disciplined, heavily armed and entrenched enemy forces. An example of the outstanding bravery and aggressiveness occurred 21 August during a reconnaissance in force mission. The lead elements of Company C, 1st Battalion came under heave mortar, rocket propelled grenade, machine gun, and automatic weapons fire. The company deployed against the enemy forces while the scout platoon protected the company flank and prevented reinforcement by a battalion sized enemy unit. Through skillful us of close supporting fires from artillery, helicopter gunship and tactical air, the officers and the men of the Task Force repulsed "human Wave" Counterattacks and defeated a numerically superior enemy force, which left one hundred eighty-two dead on the battle field. The individual act of gallantry, the teamwork and the aggressiveness of the officers and men of the 1st Battalion Task Force continued throughout the period of prolonged combat operations, resulting in the resounding defeat of enemy forces in their operational area. The heroic efforts, extraordinary bravery and professional competence displayed by the men of the 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry and attached units are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon themselves, their units, ant the Armed Forces of the United States.
9th Marines U.S. Marine Corps Operation Dewey Canyon 22 January 1969 to 18 March 1969
26th Marines U.S. Marine Corps 21 September 1969 to 19 March 1970 SU 1st MarDiv (26th Regiment)
26th Marines U.S. Marine Corps 20 November 1968 to 7 December 1968 SU 1st MarDiv (BLT only)
26th Marines U.S. Marine Corps 1 April 1968 to 26 August 1968 SU 1st MarDiv, (H&S only)
26th Marines U.S. Marine Corps 20 January 1968 to 31 March 1968 SU 26th Mar
1st Mobile Communications Group U.S Air Force 1969 Vietnam War 1 January 1967 to 15 February 1968 The only Air Force unit to have received the PUC during the Vietnam War. There is also another Air Force Unit that received the Marine Presidential Unit Citation in Vietnam. Det, 903rd Aero Med Evac Squadron 20 Jan-31 Mar 68 for the battle of Khe Sanh Combat Base.

D Company, 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment Australian Army 1968 Battle of Long Tan 18 August 1966 - 19 August 1966

Operation Iraqi Freedom

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
24th Marine Expeditionary Unit U.S. Marine Corps 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation
3rd Infantry Division U.S. Army 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Army Citation
1st Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation
1st Marine Expeditionary Force U.S. Marine Corps 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation
9th Communications Battalion U.S. Marine Corps 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation
First Naval Construction Division - 1st Marine Expeditionary Force (I MEF - Engineer Group (I MEG) U.S. Navy 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation, for 31 March to 24 April 2003
NSW Task Group-Central, NSW Squadron 3, and NSW Unit 3 U.S. Navy 2006 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation

Cold War

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
USS Parche (SSN-683) US Navy various Operation Ivy Bells Navy Citations; awarded nine PUC, the most for any unit in the history of the U.S. Navy.
USS Halibut (SSN-587) US Navy 1972 Operation Ivy Bells Navy Citation.
USS Halibut (SSN-587) US Navy 1968 Operation Sand Dollar Navy Citation for search mission to locate the sunken Soviet ballistic missile submarine K-129 (Project Jennifer).
USS Triton (SSRN-586) US Navy 1960 Operation Sandblast Navy Citation for the first submerged circumnavigation made during its shakedown cruise, for 16 February 1960 to 10 May 1960; second peacetime PUC awarded to a unit of the U.S. Navy.
USS Nautilus (SSN-571) US Navy 1958 Operation Sunshine Navy Citation for the first submerged voyage under the North Pole, for 22 July 1958 to 5 August 1958; first peacetime PUC awarded to a unit of the U.S. Navy.

Other actions

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
US Coast Guard US Coast Guard 2006 Hurricane Katrina Entire Coast Guard (including auxiliary and civilians)

Non-U.S. recipients

World War II

Two units of the Free French Forces were awarded Presidential Unit Citations during the Second World War. The first was the 2nd Armored Division, which received the award after the liberation of Strasbourg; the second was the 3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment, which received it in 1946 with the inscription 'Rhine-Bavarian Alps'.

The 1st Fighter Group of the Força Aérea Brasileira (the Brazilian Air Force) received the award on 22 April 1986 for its bravery during the Italian Campaign in World War II.

Korean War

The 1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment and Troop C, 170th Independent Mortar Battery of the British Army were both awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their defence of a hill whilst surrounded during the Battle of the Imjin River. The 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and 3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment were awarded the citation for their actions during the Battle of Kapyong, shortly afterwards.

One Belgian unit, now the 3rd Parachute Regiment, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation once for actions

One Dutch unit, the Netherlands Detachment United Nations, part of the Regiment Van Heutsz, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation twice for actions during the Korean War. The first citation was awarded after the battle near Wonju and Hoengson in February 1951. The unit was awarded a second time for its bravery during the Soyang River Battle in May-June 1951.

One South African unit, the 2 Squadron SAAF was also awarded this honour, presented in August, 1956.

President Harry Truman signed a Distinguished Unit Citation (now the Presidential Unit Citation) on July 11, 1951 for the Turkish Brigade's acts of heroism. It reads: "The Turkish Brigade, a member of the United Nations Forces in Korea is cited for exceptionally outstanding performance of duty in combat in the area of Kumyangjang-ni, Korea, from 25 to 27 January 1951."

Vietnam War

A Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to D Company, 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, on May 28, 1968, for the unit's actions at Long Tan, South Vietnam.

In 1977 the Presidential Unit Citation 1st Class was presented to New Zealand's 161 Battery in 1977 for service during the Vietnam War in 1965-66.

In 1971 the Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to the 3d Armored Cavalry Squadron Army of the Republic of Vietnam for extraordinary heroism during the period 1 January 1968 to 30 September 1968 in actions in Pleiku and Binh Dinh Provinces. (DA General Order No. 24, 27 April 1971.)

War in Afghanistan

In 2004, the New Zealand Special Air Service and the Canadian Joint Task Force 2, both special operations units working with Task Force K-BAR, were awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for service in the War in Afghanistan.

On December 7, 2004 the Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to Kommando Spezialkräfte (KSK) of the German Bundeswehr for their actions in Afghanistan.

On March 8, 2005, the Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to Marinejegerkommandoen (MJK) of the Royal Norwegian Navy and the Army Presidential Unit Citaion to Hærens Jegerkommando (HJK) of the Norwegian Army for their actions in Afghanistan.

See also

Notes

References

*

Search another word or see Presidential_Unit_Citation_(United_States)on Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature