Definitions

List_of_battery_sizes

List of battery sizes

This article refers to common battery types and sizes in household and light industrial use.

Battery size generally refers to the shape, voltage, and terminal layout of a battery. Thus the term "size" has become interchangeable with "type". Batteries of different types will usually not have the same dimensions and terminal layout.

Battery chemistry

Older batteries were mostly based on rechargeable lead-acid or non-rechargeable alkaline chemistries, with nominal voltages in increments of 1.5 Volts, each representing one individual electrochemical cell.

New special battery chemistries have strained older naming conventions. Rechargeable NiCd and NiMH typically output 1.25 V per cell. Some devices may not operate properly with these cells, given the 16% reduction in voltage, but most modern ones handle them well. Conversely, lithium-ion rechargeable batteries output 3.7 V per cell, 23% higher than a pair of alkaline cells (3 V), which they are often designed to replace. Non-rechargeable lithium-chemistry batteries, which provide exceptionally high energy density, produce about 1.5 V per cell and are thus similar to alkaline batteries.

Many new battery sizes refer to both the batteries' size and chemistry, while older names do not. For a more complete list see battery types. This summary is only for types relating to battery "sizes".

Primary battery chemistries

(in order of increasing energy density)
Chemistry Cell
Voltage
Elaboration
Zinc–carbon 1.5 Inexpensive.
Zinc chloride 1.5 Also known as "heavy duty", inexpensive.
alkaline
(zinc–manganese dioxide)
1.5 Moderate energy density.
Good for high and low drain uses.
oxy nickel hydroxide
(zinc-manganese dioxide/oxy nickel hydroxide)
1.7 Moderate energy density.
Good for high drain uses
Lithium
(lithium–copper oxide)
Li–CuO
1.5 End of life.
SR battery is used instead now.
Lithium
(lithium–iron disulfide)
LiFeS2
1.5 Expensive.
Used in 'plus' or 'extra' batteries.
Lithium
(lithium–manganese dioxide)
LiMnO2
3.0 Expensive.
Only used in high-drain devices or for long shelf life due to very low rate of self discharge.
'Lithium' alone usually refers to this type of chemistry.
Mercury oxide 1.35 High drain and constant voltage.
Banned in most countries because of health concerns.
Zinc–air 1.35–1.65 Mostly used in hearing aids.
Silver oxide (silver-zinc) 1.55 Very expensive.
Only used commercially in 'button' cells.

Rechargeable battery chemistries

(in order of increasing energy density)
Chemistry Cell
Voltage
Comments
NiCd 1.2 Inexpensive.
High/low drain, moderate energy density.
Moderate rate of self discharge.
Suffers from memory effect (which sometimes causes early failure)
Lead Acid 2.2 Moderately expensive.
High/low drain, moderate energy density.
Moderate rate of self discharge.
Does not suffer from memory effect
Common use - Automobile batteries
NiMH 1.2 Expensive. Useful in high drain devices.
Traditional chemistry has high energy density, but also a high rate of self-discharge.
Newer chemistry has low self-discharge rate, but also a ~25% lower energy density.
Lithium ion 3.6 Very expensive.
Very high energy density.
Not usually available in "common" battery sizes (but see RCR-V3 for a counter-example).
Very common in laptop computers, moderate to high-end digital cameras and camcorders, and cellphones.
Very low rate of self discharge.
Loses 5%-10% of its storage capacity every year from the time of manufacture whether it's used or not.
Volatile: Chance of explosion if short circuited, allowed to overheat, or not manufactured with rigorous quality standards.

Non-standard brand-specific names

Battery naming is further confused by the practice of manufacturers that assign novel names and numbers to their batteries, disregarding common, colloquial, IEC, and ANSI naming conventions (see LR44 battery as an example). Often this is done to steer customers towards a specific brand, and away from competing or generic brands, by obfuscating the common name. For example, if a remote control needs a new battery and the battery compartment has the label, "Replace with CX472 type battery," many customers will buy that specific brand, not realizing that this is simply a brand name for a common type of battery. In this article, brand-specific names have been purposefully omitted to avoid confusion.

On the other hand, with obscure battery types, the name of a specific brand will sometimes become the most common name for that battery type, as other manufacturers copy or modify the name so that customers recognize it.

Table of modern battery sizes

The following table is a list of battery sizes which are currently available in modern society. Note that there were other sizes other than those listed in this table which are no longer available due to either a decline in popularity or changing technological needs. Batteries for obsolete portable vacuum tubes devices for example, are not listed. A table of older, obsolete, and uncommon-availability batteries types and sizes can be found below this table.

Most Common Batteries

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Most
Common
Name
Other
Common
Names
IEC
Name
ANSI/NEDA
Name
Typical Capacity
(mAh)
Nominal Voltage (V) Shape Terminal layout Dimensions
AAA Micro
Microlight
MN2400
MX2400
LR03 (alkaline)
R03 (carbon–zinc)
FR03 (Li–FeS2)
24A (alkaline)
24D (carbon–zinc)
24LF (Li–FeS2)
1200 (alkaline)
540 (carbon–zinc)
800–1000 (Ni–MH)
1.5
1.2 (NiMH and NiCd)
Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 44.5 mm
D 10.5 mm
AA Penlight
Mignon
MN1500
MX1500
LR6 (alkaline)
R6 (carbon–zinc)
FR6 (Lithium–FeS2)
HR6 (Ni-MH)
KR157/51 (NiCd)
ZR6 (Ni-Mn)
15A (alkaline)
15D (carbon–zinc)
15LF (Lithium–FeS2)
1.2H2 (NiMH)
10015 (NiCd)
2700 (alkaline)
1100 (carbon–zinc)
3000 (Lithium–FeS2)
1700–2900 (NiMH)
600–1000 (NiCd)
1.5
1.2 (NiMH and NiCd)
Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 50.5 mm
D 13.5–14.5 mm
C MN1400
MX1400
Baby
LR14 (alkaline)
R14 (carbon–zinc)
14A (alkaline)
14D (carbon–zinc)
8000 (alkaline)
3800 (carbon–zinc)
4500–6000 (NiMH)
1.5
1.2 (NiMH)
Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 50 mm
D 26.2 mm
D U2 (In Britain until the 1970s)
Flashlight Battery
MN1300
MX1300
Mono
LR20 (alkaline)
R20 (carbon–zinc)
13A (alkaline)
13D (carbon–zinc)
12000 (alkaline)
8000 (carbon–zinc)
9000–11500 (NiMH)
1.5
1.2 (NiMH)
Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 61.5 mm
D 34.2 mm
9-Volt PP3
Radio battery
MN1604
Square(sic) battery
6LR61 (alkaline)
6F22 (carbon–zinc)
6KR61 (NiCd)
1604A (alkaline)
1604D (carbon–zinc)
1604LC (Lithium)
7.2H5 (NiMH)
11604 (NiCd)
565 (alkaline)
400 (carbon–zinc)
1200 (lithium)
175 (NiMH)
120 (NiCd)
500 (Lithium polymer rechrg)
9
7.2 (NiMH and NiCd)
8.4 (some NiMH and NiCd)
Rectangular both small end
+ male clasp
− female clasp
H 48.5 mm
L 26.5 mm
W 17.5 mm
Lantern (Spring) Lantern
6 Volt
Spring Top
MN908
4R25Y (alkaline)
4R25 (carbon–zinc)
908A (alkaline)
908D (carbon–zinc)
26000 (alkaline)
10500 (carbon–zinc)
6 Square Springs Top
+ Corner
− Center
H 115 mm
L 68.2 mm
W 68.2 mm

Less Common Batteries

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Most
Common
Name
Other
Common
Names
IEC
Name
ANSI/NEDA
Name
Typical Capacity
(mAh)
Nominal Voltage (V) Shape Terminal layout Dimensions
123 Camera Battery
CR123
CR123A
123A
R123 (Li-Ion)
RCR123 (Li-Ion)
CR17345 (Lithium) 5018LC (Lithium) 1500 (Lithium)
700 (Li–Ion)
3 (Lithium)
3.6 (Li-Ion)
Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 34.5 mm
D 17 mm
4.5 Volt Pocketable Battery
1203
4.5 V
3LR12 (alkaline)
3R12 (carbon–zinc)
MN1203 (manganese) 6100 (alkaline)
1200 (carbon–zinc)
4.5  Flat pack + short terminal strip
− long terminal strip
H 65 mm
L 61 mm
W 21 mm
A23 23A
3LR50
MN21
8LR50 (alkaline) 1181A (alkaline) 40 (alkaline) 12 Cylinder
(or button stack)
+ Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 29 mm
D 10 mm
RF devices such as key fob-style garage door openers and keyless entry systems where only infrequent pulse current is used. Sometimes enclosed like a normal battery but sometimes a stack of eight LR932 button cells shrink wrapped together. (see here about naming)
AAAA MX2500 LR8D425 (alkaline) 25A (alkaline) 625 (alkaline) 1.5 Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 42.5 mm
D 8.3 mm
glucose meters. Most common use is as an internal component of PP3 batteries.
CR-V3 CRV3
RCR-V3 (Li-Ion)
3000 (Lithium)
1300 (Li-Ion)
3 Flat pack Both on one end 52.20 × 28.05 × 14.15 mm
Duplex 2R10 3 Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
H 74.6 mm
D 21.8 mm
F 1.5 Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 91 mm
D 33mm
J 7K67  4LR61 (alkaline) 1412A (alkaline) 625 (alkaline) 6 Square with
missing corner
Flat contacts
− top side
+ missing corner
H 48.5 mm
L 35.6 mm
W 9.18 mm
Lantern (Screw) Lantern
6 Volt
Screw Top
4R25Y (alkaline)
4R25 (carbon–zinc)
915A (alkaline)
908 (carbon–zinc)
26000 (alkaline)
10500 (carbon–zinc)
6 Square Screw Posts Top
+ Corner
− Center
H 115 mm
L 68.2 mm
W 68.2 mm
Lantern (Big) 918
R25-2
Big Lantern
Double Lantern
MN918
4LR25-24 (alkaline)
4R25-2 (carbon–zinc)
8R25 (carbon–zinc)
918A (alkaline)
918D (carbon–zinc)
52000 (alkaline)
22000 (carbon–zinc)
6 Square Screw posts
Apart top
H 127 mm
L 136.5 mm
W 73 mm
N Lady
MN9100
SUM5
SUM-5
R1
LR1 (alkaline) 910A (alkaline) 1000 (alkaline) 1.5 Cylinder + Nub cylinder end
− Flat opposite end
L 30.2 mm
D 12 mm
No. 6 Ignition Cell 1.5 Cylinder + Center binding post
− Rim binding post
glow plug model engines.

Button Batteries. See Naming Notes below about CR, SR, LR, and AG battery types.

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Most
Common
Name
Other
Common
Names
IEC
Name
ANSI/NEDA
Name
Typical Capacity
(mAh)
Nominal Voltage (V) Shape Terminal layout Dimensions
CR927       30 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 9.5 mm
H 2.7 mm
blinkies.
CR1220   CR1220 (Lithium)   40 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 12.5 mm
H 2.0 mm
CR1225   CR1225 (Lithium)   50 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 12.5 mm
H 2.5 mm
CR1616 CR1616 (Lithium) 50 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 16 mm
H 1.6 mm
CR1620   CR1620 (Lithium)   78 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 16 mm
H 2.0 mm
CR2016 DL2016  CR2016 (Lithium) 5000LC (Lithium) 90 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 20 mm
H 1.6 mm
LED flashlights. CAUTION: Using two CR2016 when not specified can damage a device.
CR2025 DL2025  CR2025 (Lithium) 5003LC (Lithium) 160 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 20 mm
H 2.5 mm
CR2032 DL2032  CR2032 (Lithium) 5004LC (Lithium) 225 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 20 mm
H 3.2 mm
CMOS settings current when power is off.
CR2450 DL2450  CR2450 (Lithium) 5029LC (Lithium) 610 (Lithium) 3 Coin + bottom/sides
− top
D 24.5 mm
H 5.0 mm
CR636-2 CR636-2 (Lithium manganese) 3 Pill + bottom/sides
− top
L 9.9 mm
H 3.6 mm
W 5.9 mm
Sanyo
CR736-2 CR736-2 (Lithium manganese) 3 Pill + bottom/sides
− top
L ? mm
H 3 mm
W 7 mm
Sanyo
SR521 AG0
379
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver oxide)
Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 5.8 mm
H 2.1 mm
SR41 AG3
LR41
D384/392
LR41 (alkaline)
SR41 (silver oxide)
1135SO (silver oxide)
1134SO (silver oxide)
32 (alkaline)
42 (silver oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver oxide)
Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 7.9 mm
H 3.6 mm
SR43 AG12
LR43
D301/386
LR43 (alkaline)
SR43 (silver oxide)
1133SO (silver oxide)
1132SO (silver oxide)
80 (alkaline)
120 (silver oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver oxide)
Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 11.6 mm
H 4.2 mm
SR44 AG13
LR44
D303/357
LR44 (alkaline)
SR44 (silver oxide)
1166A (alkaline)
1107SO (silver oxide)
1131SOP (silver oxide)
150 (alkaline)
200 (silver oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver oxide)
Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 11.6 mm
H 5.4 mm
SR48 AG5
D309/393
SR48 (silver oxide) 1136SO (silver oxide)
1137SO (silver oxide)
70 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 7.9 mm
H 5.4 mm
SR54 AG10
LR54
387S/D389/390
LR54 (alkaline)
SR54 (silver oxide)
1138SO (silver oxide) 100 (alkaline)
70 (silver oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver oxide)
Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 11.6 mm
H 3.1 mm
SR55 AG8
D381/391
SR55 (silver oxide) 1160SO (silver oxide) 40 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 11.6 mm
H 2.1 mm
SR57 SR927W
AG7
D395/399
LR57 (alkaline)
SR57 (silver oxide)
116550 (silver oxide) 55 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 9.4 mm
H 2.8 mm
SR58 AG11
D361/362
SR58 (silver oxide) 1158SO (silver oxide) 24 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 7.9 mm
H 2.1 mm
SR59 AG2
D396/397
SR59 (silver oxide) 1163SO (silver oxide) 30 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 7.9 mm
H 2.6 mm
SR60 AG1
D364
SR60 (silver oxide) 1175SO (silver oxide) 20 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 6.8 mm
H 2.15 mm
SR66 AG4
D377
SR626SW
SR66 (silver oxide) 1176SO (silver oxide) 26 (silver oxide) 1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 6.8 mm
H 2.6 mm
SR69 AG6
R371
SR69 (silver oxide)     1.55 (silver oxide) Button + bottom/sides
− top
D 9.5 mm
H 2.10 mm

Naming notes

  • SR# / LR# / AG# Button Cells: IEC SR series batteries are silver oxide chemistry and provide 1.55 volts, while IEC LR series batteries are alkaline chemistry and provide 1.5 volts. Since there are no 'common' names beyond the AG# designation, many places use these three terms interchangeably, and they will all fit and work. The only difference is that the SR series typically have 50% greater capacity than the LR series. In low-drain devices like watches (without lights) this isn't very important, but in high-drain devices like blinkies, key chain flashlights, or laser pointers the SR type is preferred. Typically SR and LR will be the same price unless one buys in wholesale volume so there is no reason not to get the SR version. Often the free 'demo' batteries that come with a device are the LR version.
  • IEC CR# series: Denotes lithium–manganese dioxide chemistry. Since LiMnO2 cells produce 3 volts there are usually no alternate chemistries for a CR# coin battery. Conversely one LiMnO2 cell can replace two alternate chemistry cells, in a 3, 6, 9, or 12 volt battery. CR cell numbers correlate with the cell dimensions, being the diameter in millimetres (except for the extra half millimetre in some cases) followed by the height in tenths of a millimetre.
  • Button / Coin / Miniature: In many places these are used interchangeably.

See also

References

  • IEC 60086-1: Primary batteries - Part 1: General
  • IEC 60086-2: Primary batteries - Part 2: Physical and electrical specifications
  • IEC 60086-3: Primary batteries - Part 3: Watch batteries
  • IEC 60086-4: Primary batteries - Part 4: Safety of lithium batteries
  • ANSI C18.1, Part 1 Portable Primary Cells and Batteries With Aqueous Electrolyte - General and Specifications
  • ANSI C18.1, Part 2 Portable Primary Cells and Batteries With Aqueous

Electrolyte ? Safety Standard

  • ANSI C18.2, Part 1 Portable Rechargeable Cells and Batteries - General and Specifications
  • ANSI C18.2, Part 2 Portable Rechargeable Cells and Batteries ? Safety

Standard

  • ANSI C18.3, Part 1 Portable Lithium Primary Cells and Batteries - General and Specifications
  • ANSI C18.3, Part 2 Portable Lithium Primary Cells and Batteries ? Safety Standard

External links

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