Definitions

Legal_remedy

Legal remedy

A legal remedy (also judicial relief) is the means a court of law, usually in the exercise of civil law jurisdiction, enforces a right, imposes a penalty, or makes some other court order to impose its will. In Commonwealth common law jurisdictions and related jurisdictions (e.g. the United States), the law of remedies distinguishes between a legal remedy (e.g. a specific amount of monetary damages) and an equitable remedy (e.g. injunctive relief or specific performance). Another type of remedy is declaratory relief, where a court determines the rights of the parties to an action without awarding damages or ordering equitable relief.

In English and American jurisprudence, there is a legal maxim that for every right, there is a remedy. That is, lawmakers claim to provide appropriate remedies to protect rights. This legal maxim was first enunciated by William Blackstone: "It is a settled and invariable principle in the laws of England, that every right when with-held must have a remedy, and every injury it’s [sic] proper redress." 1 William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England 23. See also Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. (1 Cranch) 137, 162-163 (1803).

Examples of legal remedies

Categories of remedies

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