Indinavir

Indinavir

Indinavir (IDV; trade name Crixivan, manufactured by Merck) is a protease inhibitor used as a component of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV infection and AIDS.

History

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved indinavir March 13, 1996, making it the eighth approved antiretroviral. Indinavir was much more powerful than any prior antiretroviral drug; using it with dual NRTIs set the standard for treatment of HIV/AIDS and raised the bar on design and introduction of subsequent antiretroviral drugs. Protease inhibitors changed the very nature of the AIDS epidemic from one of a terminal illness to a somewhat manageable one.

Increasingly, it is being replaced by newer drugs that are more convenient to take and less likely to promote resistant virus, such as lopinavir or atazanavir.

Administration

Unfortunately, indinavir wears off quickly after dosing and therefore requires dosing very precisely every eight hours in order to thwart HIV from forming drug resistant mutations including resistances to other protease inhibitors. It has restrictions on what sorts of food may be eaten concurrently.

Side effects

Side effects include

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