Ignatius

Ignatius

[ig-ney-shuhs]
Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831-1901, American author and agrarian reformer, b. Philadelphia. He studied law, was admitted to the bar, and in 1856 moved to Minnesota. There he gained political prominence, was lieutenant governor (1859-63), Congressman (1863-69), and a state legislator. Strongly expounding agrarian reform, he was a founder and leader of the Populist party and the author of the ringing preamble to the party platform of 1892. He edited the weekly Anti-Monopolist (1874-79) and the Populist Representative (1894-1901). His many popular works included Atlantis: The Antediluvian World (1882), an erudite but fanciful work on Atlantis; Ragnarok: The Age of Fire and Gravel (1883); two books arguing that Bacon wrote the Shakespearean plays; and a gloomy Utopian novel, Caesar's Column (1891).
Ignatius can refer to:

People

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Writers

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Literature

  • Ignatius Gallaher, a character from "A Little Cloud," a short story in Dubliners by James Joyce
  • Ignatius J. Reilly, main character from A Confederacy of Dunces, a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by John Kennedy Toole

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