Ignatius

Ignatius

[ig-ney-shuhs]
Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831-1901, American author and agrarian reformer, b. Philadelphia. He studied law, was admitted to the bar, and in 1856 moved to Minnesota. There he gained political prominence, was lieutenant governor (1859-63), Congressman (1863-69), and a state legislator. Strongly expounding agrarian reform, he was a founder and leader of the Populist party and the author of the ringing preamble to the party platform of 1892. He edited the weekly Anti-Monopolist (1874-79) and the Populist Representative (1894-1901). His many popular works included Atlantis: The Antediluvian World (1882), an erudite but fanciful work on Atlantis; Ragnarok: The Age of Fire and Gravel (1883); two books arguing that Bacon wrote the Shakespearean plays; and a gloomy Utopian novel, Caesar's Column (1891).
orig. Iñigo de Oñaz y Loyola

(born 1491, Loyola, Castile—died July 31, 1556, Rome; canonized March 12, 1622, feast day July 31) Spanish founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). Born into the nobility, he began his career as a soldier. While convalescing from wounds inflicted by a French cannonball in 1521, he experienced a religious conversion. After a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, he pursued religious studies in Spain and France. In Paris he gathered about him the companions (including St. Francis Xavier) who were to join him in founding the Jesuits. He was ordained a priest in 1537 and established the Society of Jesus in 1539. The new order received papal approval in 1540, and Loyola served as its general until his death, by which time it had branches in Italy, Spain, Germany, France, Portugal, India, and Brazil. Loyola described his mystical vision of prayer in The Spiritual Exercises. In his last years he laid the foundations of a system of Jesuit schools.

Learn more about Loyola, Saint Ignatius of with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(died circa 110, Rome; Western feast day October 17; Eastern feast day December 20) Early Christian martyr. Probably of Syrian origin, he may have been a pagan who persecuted Christians before his conversion. He succeeded St. Peter the Apostle as bishop of Antioch. During the reign of Trajan, Roman authorities arrested Ignatius and sent him to Rome, where he was tried and executed. He wrote a series of famous letters on the journey to Rome, attempting to encourage his fellow Christians during their persecution. The letters condemn two sets of heretics: the Judaizers, who insisted that Christians continue to follow Jewish law, and the Docetists, who maintained that Jesus only appeared to suffer and die on the cross.

Learn more about Ignatius of Antioch, Saint with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Iñigo de Oñaz y Loyola

(born 1491, Loyola, Castile—died July 31, 1556, Rome; canonized March 12, 1622, feast day July 31) Spanish founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). Born into the nobility, he began his career as a soldier. While convalescing from wounds inflicted by a French cannonball in 1521, he experienced a religious conversion. After a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, he pursued religious studies in Spain and France. In Paris he gathered about him the companions (including St. Francis Xavier) who were to join him in founding the Jesuits. He was ordained a priest in 1537 and established the Society of Jesus in 1539. The new order received papal approval in 1540, and Loyola served as its general until his death, by which time it had branches in Italy, Spain, Germany, France, Portugal, India, and Brazil. Loyola described his mystical vision of prayer in The Spiritual Exercises. In his last years he laid the foundations of a system of Jesuit schools.

Learn more about Loyola, Saint Ignatius of with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(died circa 110, Rome; Western feast day October 17; Eastern feast day December 20) Early Christian martyr. Probably of Syrian origin, he may have been a pagan who persecuted Christians before his conversion. He succeeded St. Peter the Apostle as bishop of Antioch. During the reign of Trajan, Roman authorities arrested Ignatius and sent him to Rome, where he was tried and executed. He wrote a series of famous letters on the journey to Rome, attempting to encourage his fellow Christians during their persecution. The letters condemn two sets of heretics: the Judaizers, who insisted that Christians continue to follow Jewish law, and the Docetists, who maintained that Jesus only appeared to suffer and die on the cross.

Learn more about Ignatius of Antioch, Saint with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Ignatius can refer to:

People

Saints

Writers

Schools

Literature

  • Ignatius Gallaher, a character from "A Little Cloud," a short story in Dubliners by James Joyce
  • Ignatius J. Reilly, main character from A Confederacy of Dunces, a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by John Kennedy Toole

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