Holy_trinity_(cuisine)

Holy trinity (cuisine)

The holy trinity of cuisine refers specificly to the use originated from the Cajun and Creole cuisines of Louisiana in the Southern United States, where chopped celery, bell peppers, and onions is commonly accepted as the staple base for much of Cajun and Creole cooking. A "Trininty" can also be to a trio of ingredients key to a particular cuisine, although it is also used as a generic representation of the cornerstone ingredients of a particular national cuisine. Because these three ingredients are so common in the recipes of some cuisines, they are almost indivisible and often end up being treated as a single ingredient, and provide the distinctive flavoring of specific cuisines. Holy trinities can be essentially flavour bases that are often arrived at by sautéing a combination of any three aromatic vegetables, condiments, seasonings, herbs or spices. Cooking these few base ingredients in butter or oil releases their flavour, which is, in turn, infused into a mixture when other ingredients are added. This technique is most typically used when creating sauces, soups, stews and stir-fries.

The name is an allusion to the Holy Trinity of the Christian faith, and its use originated from the Cajun and Creole cuisines of Louisiana in the Southern United States, where chopped celery, bell peppers, and onions is commonly accepted as the staple base for much of Cajun and Creole cooking.

Common trinities in other cuisines are:

Notes

References

External links

The Holy Trinity: Ingredient Trios

Search another word or see Holy_trinity_(cuisine)on Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;