Hillary

Hillary

[hil-uh-ree]
Hillary, Sir Edmund Percival, 1919-2008, New Zealand mountain climber and explorer. He went on many mountain-climbing expeditions before 1953, when he and Tenzing Norgay of Nepal were the first people to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. He was later knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. In 1958, leading a five-person group by dog sled and snow tractor across 1,200 mi (1,931 km) of Antarctica to the South Pole, he became part of the first group since 1912 to reach the Pole by overland route. In 1960 he embarked on a search for the abominable snowman. A year later he suffered a mild cerebral stroke while climbing Mt. Makalu (27,790 ft; 8,470 m) in Nepal. He served as New Zealand's high commissioner (ambassador) to India, Bangladesh, and Nepal from 1985 to 1988. His works include High Adventure (1955), the story of his Everest climb, and No Latitude for Error (1961), which recounts the South Pole expedition.

Sir Edmund Hillary, 1956.

(born July 20, 1919, Auckland, N.Z.—died Jan. 11, 2008, Auckland) New Zealand mountain climber and explorer. Hillary was a professional beekeeper but enjoyed climbing in the New Zealand Alps. In 1951 he joined a New Zealand party to the central Himalayas and then went on to help in a reconnaissance of the southern flank of Everest. In 1953, as a member of the British Everest expedition, he and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit on May 29, becoming the first known climbers to do so. The achievement brought Hillary worldwide fame and he was knighted that same year. In 1958 he participated in the first crossing of Antarctica by vehicle. From the 1960s he helped build schools and hospitals for the Sherpa people.

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Sir Edmund Hillary, 1956.

(born July 20, 1919, Auckland, N.Z.—died Jan. 11, 2008, Auckland) New Zealand mountain climber and explorer. Hillary was a professional beekeeper but enjoyed climbing in the New Zealand Alps. In 1951 he joined a New Zealand party to the central Himalayas and then went on to help in a reconnaissance of the southern flank of Everest. In 1953, as a member of the British Everest expedition, he and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit on May 29, becoming the first known climbers to do so. The achievement brought Hillary worldwide fame and he was knighted that same year. In 1958 he participated in the first crossing of Antarctica by vehicle. From the 1960s he helped build schools and hospitals for the Sherpa people.

Learn more about Hillary, Sir Edmund (Percival) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Hillary Diane Rodham

(born Oct. 26, 1947, Chicago, Ill., U.S.) U.S. lawyer, first lady, and politician. She attended Wellesley College and Yale Law School, from which she graduated first in her class. Her early professional interests focused on family law and children's rights. In 1975 she married her Yale classmate Bill Clinton, and she became first lady of Arkansas on his election as governor in 1979. She was twice named one of America's 100 most influential lawyers by the National Law Journal. When her husband became president (1993), she wielded power and influence almost unprecedented for a first lady. As head of the Task Force on National Health Care Reform, she proposed the first national health-care program in the U.S. but saw the initiative defeated. In 2000 she was elected to the U.S. Senate from New York, thereby becoming the first wife of a president to win elective office; she was reelected in 2006. Clinton sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008 but lost the closely contested race to Barack Obama. In 2009 she became secretary of state in President Obama's administration.

Learn more about Clinton, Hillary Rodham with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Hillary Diane Rodham

(born Oct. 26, 1947, Chicago, Ill., U.S.) U.S. lawyer, first lady, and politician. She attended Wellesley College and Yale Law School, from which she graduated first in her class. Her early professional interests focused on family law and children's rights. In 1975 she married her Yale classmate Bill Clinton, and she became first lady of Arkansas on his election as governor in 1979. She was twice named one of America's 100 most influential lawyers by the National Law Journal. When her husband became president (1993), she wielded power and influence almost unprecedented for a first lady. As head of the Task Force on National Health Care Reform, she proposed the first national health-care program in the U.S. but saw the initiative defeated. In 2000 she was elected to the U.S. Senate from New York, thereby becoming the first wife of a president to win elective office; she was reelected in 2006. Clinton sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008 but lost the closely contested race to Barack Obama. In 2009 she became secretary of state in President Obama's administration.

Learn more about Clinton, Hillary Rodham with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Hillary or Hilary is a given and family name, derived from the Latin hilarius meaning cheerful. Historically, the spelling Hilary has generally been used for men and Hillary for women, though there are exceptions, some of which are noted below. In modern times it has drastically declined in popularity as a name for men.

Men with this given name

Women with this given name

People with this family name

See also

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