Definitions

Aram

Aram

[ey-ram, air-uhm]
Aram, ancient country and people centered in Damascus in S Syria between the 11th and 8th cent. B.C. The Bible records constant contacts between the Hebrews and Aram. The Aramaeans spoke Aramaic, which is a term that refers to a family of languages, of which Syriac is a part. Numerous passages in the Bible speak of Aramaean tribes living in Mesopotamia.
Aram, Eugene, 1704-59, English philologist, b. Yorkshire. A self-taught linguist, Aram was the first to identify the Celtic languages as related to the other languages of Europe. In 1758, while at work on an Anglo-Celtic lexicon, he was arrested and later hanged for the murder—14 years earlier—of his friend Daniel Clark. The story of his crime inspired Thomas Hood's poem The Dream of Eugene Aram, and Bulwer-Lytton's novel Eugene Aram.

(born June 6, 1903, Tbilisi, Georgia, Russian Empire—died May 1, 1978, Moscow, U.S.S.R.) Soviet (Armenian) composer. He studied with Reinhold Glière (1875–1956) and Nikolay Myaskovsky (1881–1950). He gained international notice when Sergey Prokofiev recommended one of his pieces for a Paris concert. Active in the composer's union, Khachaturian (along with Dmitry Shostakovich and Prokofiev) was criticized by the government in 1948 for “formalist tendencies,” though his music was in fact always conservative and accessible. After Joseph Stalin's death (1953), Khachaturian published a call for greater artistic freedom. His ballet scores include Masquerade (1944) and Spartacus (1954); Gayane (1943) contains the well-known “Sabre Dance.” Other popular pieces include his piano and violin concertos.

Learn more about Khachaturian, Aram (Ilyich) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born June 6, 1903, Tbilisi, Georgia, Russian Empire—died May 1, 1978, Moscow, U.S.S.R.) Soviet (Armenian) composer. He studied with Reinhold Glière (1875–1956) and Nikolay Myaskovsky (1881–1950). He gained international notice when Sergey Prokofiev recommended one of his pieces for a Paris concert. Active in the composer's union, Khachaturian (along with Dmitry Shostakovich and Prokofiev) was criticized by the government in 1948 for “formalist tendencies,” though his music was in fact always conservative and accessible. After Joseph Stalin's death (1953), Khachaturian published a call for greater artistic freedom. His ballet scores include Masquerade (1944) and Spartacus (1954); Gayane (1943) contains the well-known “Sabre Dance.” Other popular pieces include his piano and violin concertos.

Learn more about Khachaturian, Aram (Ilyich) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

The term Aram can refer to:

See also

Aramaean (disambiguation)

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