Apache

Apache

[uh-pahsh, uh-pash; Fr. a-pash]
Apache, Native North Americans of the Southwest composed of six culturally related groups. They speak a language that has various dialects and belongs to the Athabascan branch of the Nadene linguistic stock (see Native American languages), and their ancestors entered the area about 1100. The Navajo, who also speak an Athabascan language, were once part of the Western Apache; other groups E of the Rio Grande along the mountains were the Jicarilla, the Lipan, and the Mescalero groups. In W New Mexico and Arizona were the Western Apache, including the Chiricahua, the Coyotero, and the White Mountain Apache. The Kiowa Apache in the early southward migration attached themselves to the Kiowa, whose history they have since shared. Subsistence in historic times consisted of wild game, cactus fruits, seeds of wild shrubs and grass, livestock, grains plundered from settlements, and a small amount of horticulture. The social organization involved matrilocal residence, a rigorous mother-in-law avoidance pattern, and the husband's working for the wife's relatives.

Historically the Apache are known principally for their fierce fighting qualities. They successfully resisted the advance of Spanish colonization, but the acquisition of horses and new weapons, taken from the Spanish, led to increased intertribal warfare. The Eastern Apache were driven from their traditional plains area when (after 1720) they suffered defeat at the hands of the advancing Comanche. Relations between the Apache and the white settlers gradually worsened with the passing of Spanish rule in Mexico. By the mid-19th cent., when the United States acquired the region from Mexico, Apache lands were in the path of the American westward movement. The futile but strong resistance that lasted until the beginning of the 20th cent. brought national fame to several of the Apache leaders—Cochise, Geronimo, Mangas Coloradas, and Victorio.

Today the Apache, numbering some 50,000 in 1990, live mainly on reservations totaling over 3 million acres in Arizona and New Mexico and retain many tribal customs. Cattle, timber, tourism, and the development of mineral resources provide income. In 1982 the Apaches won a major Supreme Court test of their right to tax resources extracted from their lands. In 1995, after much debate, the Mescalero Apache agreed to build a nuclear-waste storage site on their New Mexico reservation. The project is expected to produce about $250 million in income over the 40-year life of the site.

See G. C. Baldwin, The Warrior Apaches (1965); D. L. Thrapp, The Conquest of Apacheria (1967); K. Basso and M. Opler, ed., Apachean Culture and Ethnology (1971); J. U. Terrell, Apache Chronicle (1972).

North American Indians of the southwestern U.S. Their name comes from a Zuñi word meaning “enemy.” Most Apache live on five reservations in Arizona and New Mexico. Culturally, the Apache are divided into Eastern Apache, which include the Mescalero, Jicarilla, Chiricahua, and Lipan, and Western Apache, which include the Cibecue. The Eastern Apache were predominantly hunting and gathering societies, while their Western counterparts relied more on farming. Their ancestors had come down from the north, as is evident from their languages; Apachean languages are distantly related to other Athabaskan languages spoken in Canada. They settled the Plains, but, with the introduction of the horse, they were pressed south and west by the Comanche and Ute. They attempted to befriend the Spanish, the Mexicans, and later the Americans. Beginning in 1861, however, they engaged in a quarter-century confrontation against U.S. military forces. The Apache wars were among the fiercest fought on the frontier. The last ended in 1886 with the surrender of Geronimo. The Chiricahua Apache were evacuated from the West and held successively in Florida, Alabama, and Oklahoma. Apache descendants numbered some 100,000 in the early 21st century. Seealso Cochise.

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Apache is a town in Caddo County, Oklahoma, USA. The population was 1,616 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Apache is located at (34.894638, -98.361371).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.3 km²), of which, 2.0 square miles (5.2 km²) of it is land and 0.49% is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,616 people, 646 households, and 445 families residing in the town. The population density was 799.0 people per square mile (308.9/km²). There were 712 housing units at an average density of 352.0/sq mi (136.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 70.79% White, 0.12% African American, 25.12% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.56% from other races, and 3.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.47% of the population.

There were 646 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the town the population was spread out with 29.6% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 89.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.7 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $26,953, and the median income for a family was $32,431. Males had a median income of $25,391 versus $19,853 for females. The per capita income for the town was $12,790. About 11.4% of families and 16.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 9.8% of those age 65 or over.

Local Business

Mo Betta western rodeo shirts are made in Apache.

Utilities

  • Apache Public Works Authority provides water, sewer, and sanitation services to the town.
  • Electric service is provided by American Electric Power Public Service Company of Oklahoma.
  • Natural Gas service is provided by Oklahoma Natural Gas.
  • Digital telephone service, and DSL internet is provided by Wichita Online.
  • Digital Cable TV service is provided by Southern Plains Cable Company.

References

External links

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