Definitions

Alpha_Delta_Phi

Alpha Delta Phi

Alpha Delta Phi
Coat of Arms - Founded October 29,1832 at Hamilton College
Founders

Motto Manus multæ cor unum (Many hands, one heart).
President Jon Vick, HAM '64 (Fraternity), Craig Cheslog, BDN '93 (Society)
Colors Emerald and Pearl
Flower The Lily of the Valley
Chapters 26 chapters and 3 affiliates (Fraternity), 5 chapters and 1 affiliate (Society)
Scope United States, Canada
Homepage Fraternity: http://www.alphadeltaphi.org Society: http://www.adps.org
Alpha Delta Phi (ΑΔΦ) is the fourth oldest Greek-letter fraternity in the United States and Canada. Today the name refers to both an all-male fraternity that was founded in 1832 by Samuel Eells at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York and the Alpha Delta Phi Society, which broke off from the fraternity in 1992 and which permits co-educated chapters. The Fraternity and the Society both come out of Eells's vision for a "literary society," although Alpha Delta Phi's original academic focus is preserved to varying degrees by individual chapters.

From its early days, Alpha Delta Phi sought students of a decided literary orientation. In the founder's own words, the literary pursuit of the fraternity must "be built on a more comprehensive scale than other societies, ... providing for every taste and talent and embracing every department of literature and science... It must be national and universal in all its adaptations, so as not merely to cultivate a taste for literature or furnish the mind with knowledge but with a true philosophical spirit looking to the entire man, so as to develop the whole being -- moral, social and intellectual." Today, the literary tradition is carried on the international level in the form of annual literary competitions sponsored by the Samuel Eells Literary and Educational Foundation, which awards cash prizes in each of five categories.

Alpha Delta Phi was the first fraternity to establish a chapter west of the Allegheny mountains when it formed a chapter at Miami University in 1833. This chapter inspired the formation of three national fraternities at Miami in the 19th Century.

Alpha Delta Phi was a charter member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) (NIC), and a member of Alpha Delta Phi, Hamilton W. Mabie (Williams College, class of 1867), was the first President of the NIC.

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The Split

Since the 1992 split, the Fraternity and the Society are completely separate and independent legal entities with separate governing bodies, and are not separate or parallel divisions of the same organization. The two groups share a license to use the name and intellectual property.

The Fraternity

The Fraternity is a retronym used now to distinguish the all-male Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity from the co-ed Alpha Delta Phi Society. In general parlance, the Fraternity refers to itself simply as "Alpha Delta Phi", since the Society is required to add "Society" to the end to distinguish itself.

Chapters

As of August 2008 the Fraternity has 26 chapters and 3 affiliates, the oldest chapter at Hamilton College and the most recent affiliate at Emory University.

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In addition, the Fraternity has a regional alumni organization, the Midwest Association of Alpha Delta Phi, which is more than 125 years old.

The Society

Several Alpha Delta Phi chapters began co-educating in the 1960s, starting with the California Chapter. Not all chapters approved of this change, and several decades of disputes followed, with some members lobbying for full admission of women, and others wanting to ban women altogether or grant them some form of associate membership. By 1992, the chapters agreed to bifurcate Alpha Delta Phi, creating the Alpha Delta Phi Society alongside the existing Fraternity. The Society espouses "home rule," letting each chapter decide whether or not to co-educate. To date, all of its chapters are co-educated.

Chapters

As of 2007 the Society had four undergraduate chapters, one undergraduate affiliate, and five alumni chapters.

The Society was founded in 1992 by four chapters: Brunonian (at Brown University), Columbia (at Columbia University), Middletown (at Wesleyan University), and Stanford (at Stanford University). The Bowdoin chapter, which had been required to withdraw from the Fraternity by the administration of Bowdoin College, joined the Society a year later. In 1994, the Society's first new chapter was formed at Middlebury College, becoming Alpha Delta Phi's first chapter to have a coeducational status from its inception.

Bowdoin College later abolished its fraternity system, and the Bowdoin chapter became alumni-only. In 2005, Middlebury's undergraduate chapter affiliation was revoked, and it became alumni-only as well.

In December 2007, the Society's Board of Governors voted unanimously to establish the Granite Affiliate at the University of New Hampshire.

Notable alumni

Athletics

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Business and Finance

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Clergy

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Education

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Entertainment

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Government and Military

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Law and Judiciary

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Literature and Journalism

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Science and Engineering

Farrington Daniels -- University of Minnesota, 1910, Pioneer in solar energy; Chairman, Chemistry at University of Wisconsin–Madison.

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See also

References

External links

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