Definitions

Akbar

Akbar

[ak-bahr]
Akbar, 1542-1605, Mughal emperor of India (1556-1605); son of Humayun, grandson of Babur. He succeeded to the throne under a regent, Bairam Khan, who rendered loyal service in expanding and consolidating the Mughal domains before he was summarily dismissed (1560) by the young king. Akbar, however, continued the policy of conquest. A magnetic personality and an outstanding general, he gradually enlarged his empire to include Afghanistan, Baluchistan, and nearly all of the Indian peninsula north of the Godavari River. To unify the vast state, he established a uniform system of administration throughout his empire and adopted a policy of conciliating the conquered chieftains. Having defeated the Rajputs, the most militant of the Hindu rulers, he allied himself with them, giving their chiefs high positions in his army and government; he twice married Rajput princesses. Although he was himself illiterate, Akbar's courts at Delhi, Agra, and Fatehpur Sikri were centers of the arts, letters, and learning. He was much impressed with Persian culture, and because of him the later Mughal empire bore an indelible Persian stamp. Apparently disillusioned with orthodox Islam and hoping to bring about religious unity within his empire, he promulgated (1582) the Din-i-Ilahi [divine faith], an eclectic creed derived from Islam, Hinduism, Zoroastrianism, and Christianity. A simple, monotheistic cult, tolerant in outlook, it centered on Akbar as prophet, but had an influence outside the court. Akbar, generally considered the greatest of the Mughal emperors, was succeeded by his son Jahangir.

See biography by V. A. Smith (2d rev. ed. 1966); R. Krishnamurti, Akbar, the Religious Aspect (1961).

in full Abū al-Fathsubdot Jalāl al-Dīn Muhsubdotammad Akbar

(born Oct. 15, 1542, Umarkot, Sind, India—died 1605, Agra) Greatest of the Mughal emperors (see Mughal dynasty) of India (r. 1556–1605). Akbar, whose ancestors included Timur and Genghis Khan, ascended the throne as a youth. Initially his rule extended only over the Punjab and the area around Delhi. The Rajput raja of Amber (Jaipur) acknowledged his suzerainty in 1562, and other Rajput rajas followed suit. Akbar included Rajput princes and other Hindus in the highest ranks of his government and reduced discrimination against non-Muslims. He continued his conquests, taking Gujarat in the west (1573) and Bengal in the east (annexed in 1576). Toward the end of his reign he conquered Kashmir (1586) and moved south into the Deccan. Administratively, he strengthened central power, establishing that all military officers and civil administrators were to be appointed by the emperor. He encouraged scholars, poets, painters, and musicians, making his court a centre of culture. He had Sanskrit classics translated into Persian and was enthusiastic about the European paintings presented to him by Jesuit missionaries. His reign was often portrayed as a model by later governments—strong, benevolent, tolerant, and enlightened. Seealso Bābur.

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Day of Al'Akbar (I9) is a Dungeons & Dragons module. Author: Allen Hammack (1986)

Table of Contents

Chapter Page
Introduction 2
Journey to Khaibar 3
The sewers of Khaibar 5
Beyond the Walls 14
The Sultan's Palace 35
Artifacts pullout section
Glossary of Useful Terms pullout section
Prerolled Characters pullout section
Players' Riddle Illustration 39

Credits

Design: Allen Hammack
Developer: Bruce A. Heard
Editing: Kerry as Martin
Cover Art: Jeff Easley
Illustrations: Mark Nelson
Cartography: Diane and Dave Sutherland
Typesetting: Betty Elmore

Dedication: to my parents with love, for extraordinary tolerance and encouragement, and to Jeff, Chris, and Marie, for their support and love. Special thanks to Susan Hammack, and Sandy Brachman, and Katrina.

Distributed to the book trade in the United States by Random House, Inc., and in Canada by Random House of Canada, Ltd. Distributed to the toy and hobby trade by regional distributors. Distributed in the United Kingdom by TSR UK Ltd.

product number 9178
ISBN 0-88038-320-8

Back cover reads

The land of Arir - a once peaceful desert country, dotted with oases, teeming with caravans - fell into the hand of infidels. The ruler, the dearly loved Sultan Amhara, was killed in the battle for the capital city of Khaibar. He left behind one of the greatest treasure stores ever amassed - jewels and coins, more than anyone had ever seen before or since - and in addition, the Cup and Talisman of Al'Akbar.

A deadly plague sweeps your land. The holy men say that if only they had the Talisman, they could create cures for this dread disease. Many adventurers have tries and failed to find the Cup and Talisman. Now it is your turn. Find these treasures, and save your people!

The journey is exciting, but treacherous. Do not be distracted by exotic sights and sounds, the strange foods. You must avoid being discovered by Al'Farzikh and his brigands, as you infiltrate the palace. Be wary - what is most beautiful may be most deadly, and what seems useless may be priceless.

Notable nonplayer characters

  • Al'Farzikh: 7th level assassin
  • Vahtak: 6th level thief
  • The Mad Dog of the Desert: 14th level Magic user/16th level assassin
  • The Crescent Witch: 8th level Magic user

See also

References and Footnotes

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External links

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