Wigglesworth

Wigglesworth

[wig-uhlz-wurth]
Wigglesworth, Michael, 1631-1705, American clergyman and poet, b. England, grad. Harvard, 1651. His family emigrated to New England in 1638. A devoted minister at Malden, Mass., he also practiced medicine and wrote didactic poetry. His Day of Doom (1662), a ballad of Puritan theology, was extremely popular and was followed by God's Controversy with New England (written c.1662; printed 1873), Meat out of the Eater (1670), and lesser writings. Replete with vivid biblical imagery, Wigglesworth's verse reflects his dedication to his austere faith.

See his Diary, 1653-57, ed. by E. S. Morgan (1951, repr. 1970); The Day of Doom (ed. by K. B. Murdock, 1929); memoir by J. W. Dean (2d ed. 1871); biography by R. Crowder (1962).

Wigglesworth is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. It is on the road between Long Preston to the east, Clitheroe to the south and the small village of Rathmell lies just to the north. It is about 5 miles south of Settle.

Despite the size of the village, it has its own post office and public house, called the Plough Inn. Wigglesworth consists of a few small scattered houses and farmsteads. The heart of the village (or hamlet as it has no church or place of worship) lies on the crossroads between Clitheroe, Rathmell and Long Preston.

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