Wiener

Wiener

[wee-ner]
Wiener, Norbert, 1894-1964, American mathematician, educator, and founder of the field of cybernetics, b. Columbia, Mo., grad. Tufts College, 1909, Ph.D. Harvard, 1913. In 1920 he joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he became (1932) professor of mathematics. He made significant contributions to a number of areas of mathematics including harmonic analysis and Fourier transforms, but is best known for his theory of cybernetics, the comparative study of control and communication in humans and machines. He also made significant contributions to the development of computers and calculators. Wiener recounted his youth and training in the autobiographical Ex-Prodigy (1953). He described his mature years and scientific career in I Am a Mathematician (1956). His other writings include The Human Use of Human Beings (1950), Nonlinear Problems in Random Theory (1958), and Cybernetics (1948, rev. ed. 1961).

See F. Conway and J. Siegelman, Dark Hero of the Information Age (2004).

Norbert Wiener.

(born Nov. 26, 1894, Columbia, Mo., U.S.—died March 18, 1964, Stockholm, Swed.) U.S. mathematician. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard at 18. He joined the faculty of MIT in 1919. His work on generalized harmonic analysis and Tauberian theorems (which deduce the convergence of an infinite series) won the American Mathematical Society's Bôcher Prize in 1933. The origin of cybernetics as an independent science is generally dated from the 1948 publication of his Cybernetics. He made contributions to such areas as stochastic processes, quantum theory, and, during World War II, gunfire control. Crater Wiener on the Moon is named for him.

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Norbert Wiener.

(born Nov. 26, 1894, Columbia, Mo., U.S.—died March 18, 1964, Stockholm, Swed.) U.S. mathematician. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard at 18. He joined the faculty of MIT in 1919. His work on generalized harmonic analysis and Tauberian theorems (which deduce the convergence of an infinite series) won the American Mathematical Society's Bôcher Prize in 1933. The origin of cybernetics as an independent science is generally dated from the 1948 publication of his Cybernetics. He made contributions to such areas as stochastic processes, quantum theory, and, during World War II, gunfire control. Crater Wiener on the Moon is named for him.

Learn more about Wiener, Norbert with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Wiener is German for Viennese, but may also refer to:

  • A hot dog, from German "Wiener Würstchen", meaning "Viennese small sausage"
  • A slang term for penis

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