Wenzel

Wenzel

[Ger. ven-tsuhl]
Jamitzer, Wenzel: see Jamnitzer, Wenzel.
Jamnitzer, Jamitzer, or Gemniczer, Wenzel, 1508-85, leading member of a German family of goldsmiths and engravers. Born in Vienna, he settled in Nuremberg where, as a leading artisan of his day, he executed work for emperors and officials of the court and the church. Examples of his refined workmanship, showing the German adaptation of Italian mannerist forms, are to be seen in the Louvre and in the Victoria and Albert Museum. His gilt bronze nude Spring is in Vienna.
Gemniczer, Wenzel: see Jamnitzer.
later Duke von Mecklenburg

(born Sept. 24, 1583, Herhacekmanice, Bohemia—died Feb. 25, 1634, Eger) Austrian general. A noble of Bohemia, he served with the future Habsburg emperor Ferdinand II in the campaign against Venice in 1617. He remained loyal to Ferdinand when other Bohemian nobles revolted (1618–23) and was made governor of Bohemia and allowed to acquire vast holdings in confiscated estates. Created duke of Friedland (1625), he commanded the imperial armies in the Thirty Years' War. After successes in the war against Denmark (1625–29), he was awarded the principality of Sagan (1627) and the duchy of Mecklenburg (1629). Under pressure from the German princes, Ferdinand was forced to dismiss Wallenstein. Recalled to imperial command in 1631, he drove the Swedish army from Bavaria and Franconia but was defeated at the Battle of Lützen (1632). Believing he had the support of his generals, he mounted a revolt against the emperor (1634) and was assassinated.

Learn more about Wallenstein, Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von, duke von Friedland with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(baptized June 19, 1717, Deutschbrod, Bohemia—died March 27?, 1757, Mannheim, Palatinate) Bohemian-born German composer and violinist. He joined the elector's court in Mannheim circa 1741, and he soon became director of its orchestra, which he built into the finest in Europe. He wrote some 75 symphonies, in which he helped establish the four-movement form as the standard and introduced the orchestral crescendo to Germany from Italian music. He and his students (including his sons) made up what is called the Mannheim school. His son Carl (1745–1801), also a composer and violinist, played in Mannheim, toured widely as a soloist, and wrote more than 50 symphonies.

Learn more about Stamitz, Johann (Wenzel Anton) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(baptized June 19, 1717, Deutschbrod, Bohemia—died March 27?, 1757, Mannheim, Palatinate) Bohemian-born German composer and violinist. He joined the elector's court in Mannheim circa 1741, and he soon became director of its orchestra, which he built into the finest in Europe. He wrote some 75 symphonies, in which he helped establish the four-movement form as the standard and introduced the orchestral crescendo to Germany from Italian music. He and his students (including his sons) made up what is called the Mannheim school. His son Carl (1745–1801), also a composer and violinist, played in Mannheim, toured widely as a soloist, and wrote more than 50 symphonies.

Learn more about Stamitz, Johann (Wenzel Anton) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

later Duke von Mecklenburg

(born Sept. 24, 1583, Herhacekmanice, Bohemia—died Feb. 25, 1634, Eger) Austrian general. A noble of Bohemia, he served with the future Habsburg emperor Ferdinand II in the campaign against Venice in 1617. He remained loyal to Ferdinand when other Bohemian nobles revolted (1618–23) and was made governor of Bohemia and allowed to acquire vast holdings in confiscated estates. Created duke of Friedland (1625), he commanded the imperial armies in the Thirty Years' War. After successes in the war against Denmark (1625–29), he was awarded the principality of Sagan (1627) and the duchy of Mecklenburg (1629). Under pressure from the German princes, Ferdinand was forced to dismiss Wallenstein. Recalled to imperial command in 1631, he drove the Swedish army from Bavaria and Franconia but was defeated at the Battle of Lützen (1632). Believing he had the support of his generals, he mounted a revolt against the emperor (1634) and was assassinated.

Learn more about Wallenstein, Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von, duke von Friedland with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Wenzel is a male given name (long version Wenzeslaus) as the German form of the Czech given name Václav or Venceslav, meaning "praised with glory". Variations are Вячеслав (Russian), Vencel (Hungarian), Wacław (Polish), Venceslas/Wenceslas (French), Vinceslao (Italian), Wenceslao (Spanish).

Search another word or see wenzelon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature