vivisection

vivisection

[viv-uh-sek-shuhn]
vivisection, dissection of living animals for experimental purposes. The use of the term in recent years has been expanded to include all experimentation on living animals, rather than just dissection alone. The practice contributed to the outstanding progress that was made in the 17th cent. by William Harvey in understanding the circulation of the blood. However, the use of research animals in the laboratory did not become widespread in Europe until the 19th cent. In 1896, when the National Institute of Health originated in the United States, it began to take an active role in encouraging proper care and use of laboratory animals. Since 1945, the National Society for Medical Research has tried to explain to the public the nature and necessity of experimental procedures on animals. During the 1980s, the incidence of vandalism, harassment, and theft in research centers using animals for testing increased greatly. Most nations have government agencies that assume advisory or regulatory roles in the practice of vivisection. Private organizations in the United States concerned with vivisection include the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS), and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). In the United States today, strict rules and procedures, laid down by the National Institutes of Health and a number of other public and private organizations, ensure ethical and sensitive use of animals for research. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Animal Welfare Regulations are among the most important documents setting forth requirements for animal care and use by institutions using animals in research, testing, and education. Regulations have been effective since 1985. Members of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees observe and enforce compliance to these rulings on institutional levels. The USDA regularly inspects all institutions that use animals for experimental purposes. Animals most frequently used in the laboratory include rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbits, and monkeys. When animals more closely resembling humans in size and structure are needed, dogs and chimpanzees may be utilized. Animal experimentation is especially advantageous if offspring of several generations are to be observed: for instance, about 5 generations of mice can be observed in a year, whereas in humans the same experiment would require over 100 years.

See studies by T. Regan (1988), S. Sperling (1988), and B. Rollin (1989).

Vivisection is surgery conducted upon a living organism, typically animals with a central nervous system. A broader interpretation includes non-behavioural experimental research involving living animals. In this interpretation, the term is preferred by those opposed to research using animals, as there it implies otherwise avoidable suffering. In the scientific community, vivisection for living tissue study has been superseded by modern techniques, and the term "animal experimentation" is applied to all research involving animal studies, regardless of mortality. Non-arbitrary research requiring vivisection techniques that cannot be met through other means are subject to an external ethics review in conception and implementation. Although vivisection is restricted to cancer and other malignant disease research, the distinction between humanitarian and commercial goals remains a contentious issue.

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