Definitions

violet

violet

[vahy-uh-lit]
violet, common name for some members of the Violaceae, a family of chiefly perennial herbs (and sometimes shrubs, small trees, or climbers) found on all continents. Violets, including the genus Viola and similar related species, are popular as florists', garden, and wildflowers. Of this large group, with its fragrant blossoms ranging from deep purple to yellow or white, over 60 species are native to the United States and well over 100 varieties are offered in trade as ornamentals. Florists' violets are usually the sweet, or English, violet (V. odorata). Garden violets (often called violas) are generally hybrids and may be purple, blue, rose, yellow, white, or combinations of these, sometimes with double flowers. It became the flower of Athens; followers of Napoleon, who promised to return from Elba with violets in the spring, used the blossom as a badge; and in the United States a violet is the floral emblem of three states (New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin). The flavors of various species, particularly the sweet violet, have been used for perfume, dye, and medicine and have been candied. The common pansy was originally derived, long ago, from the Old World V. tricolor, one of several species called heartsease and Johnny-jump-up; the Eastern field pansy, a wildflower of North America, is a separate species. Some unrelated plants are also called violets, e.g., the African violet of the family Gesneriaceae (gesneria family) and the dog-toothed violet of the family Liliaceae (lily family). True violets are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Violales, family Violaceae.
orig. Joan (Violet) Maurice

(born Oct. 31, 1903, Camberley, Surrey, Eng.—died Aug. 5, 1983, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire) British economist. A professor at the University of Cambridge (1931–71), she helped develop Keynesian theory, establishing her reputation in 1933 with The Economics of Imperfect Competition, in which she analyzed distribution and allocation, dealing particularly with the concept of exploitation (see monopolistic competition). In the 1940s she began to incorporate aspects of Marxism into her work. Her unorthodox views and sympathy with noncapitalist systems—including China's, on which she wrote three books—involved her in controversy throughout her career.

Learn more about Robinson, Joan (Violet) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Feb. 10, 1927, Laurel, Miss., U.S.) U.S. soprano. She was trained at the Juilliard School. After her debut in a revival of Four Saints in Three Acts in 1952, she made her name in the international tour of Porgy and Bess (1953–55). She sang in Aïda at Milan's La Scala in 1960 and made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1961. Price was one of the Met's most popular stars for more than two decades and was the first African American singer to achieve an international reputation in opera. She gave her farewell performance of Aïda at the Met in 1985 but continued to give recitals.

Learn more about Price, (Mary Violet) Leontyne with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Joan (Violet) Maurice

(born Oct. 31, 1903, Camberley, Surrey, Eng.—died Aug. 5, 1983, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire) British economist. A professor at the University of Cambridge (1931–71), she helped develop Keynesian theory, establishing her reputation in 1933 with The Economics of Imperfect Competition, in which she analyzed distribution and allocation, dealing particularly with the concept of exploitation (see monopolistic competition). In the 1940s she began to incorporate aspects of Marxism into her work. Her unorthodox views and sympathy with noncapitalist systems—including China's, on which she wrote three books—involved her in controversy throughout her career.

Learn more about Robinson, Joan (Violet) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Any plant of the genus Saintpaulia, of the gesneriad family, especially S. ionantha. African violets are native to high elevations in tropical eastern Africa. They are small, hairy, usually stemless herbaceous plants with crowded, long-stalked leaves. The violet, white, or pink flowers bloom most of the year. They are popular houseplants, and hundreds of varieties have been developed, including half-sized miniatures.

Learn more about African violet with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Violet is a census-designated place (CDP) in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 8,555 at the 2000 census. It is located on the east bank of the Mississippi River, about 7.5 miles southeast of New Orleans.

History

The area now known as Violet was originally part of the Livaudais Plantation. Violet sprang up after the development of the Violet Canal. It was named by Albert J.C. Janin, after his wife Violet Blair Janin, a Washington, D.C. socialite and part of the influential Blair family for whom the Blair House in Washington D.C. is named.

Hurricane Katrina

On August 29, 2005, the community was essentially destroyed by storm surge and wind associated with Hurricane Katrina which topped the Hurricane Protection Levee and destroyed the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal (MRGO) levee.

Camp Hope housed volunteers assisting residents of St. Bernard Parish in their recovery from Hurricane Katrina. It was located at the W. Smith Elementary School, 6701 E. St. Bernard Highway, Violet, LA 70092.

Geography

Violet is located at (29.901244, -89.896860).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.5 square miles (11.8 km²), of which, 4.1 square miles (10.5 km²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.2 km²) of it (10.57%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 8,555 people, 2,744 households, and 2,266 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,108.4 people per square mile (813.6/km²). There were 2,918 housing units at an average density of 719.1/sq mi (277.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 58.29% White, 38.77% African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.37% from other races, and 1.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.29% of the population.

There were 2,744 households out of which 45.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 21.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.4% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.10 and the average family size was 3.41.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 32.4% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 6.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $32,993, and the median income for a family was $36,616. Males had a median income of $32,012 versus $24,799 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $13,894. About 18.5% of families and 21.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.7% of those under age 18 and 26.6% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

Search another word or see violeton Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;