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Scouting in Connecticut

Scouting in Connecticut has gone through many organizational changes in its history. While having only eight counties, Connecticut has had 40 Boy Scout Councils since the Scouting movement began in 1910. In 1922, there were 17 separate Boy Scout Councils operating in Connecticut; today there are only four. The Girl Scouts of the USA has had at least 53 Girl Scout Councils in Connecticut since their program begin in 1912; today there are five. Plans are in process to merge the current five Girl Scout Councils into one new council, to be called the Girl Scout Council of Connecticut and assume operation on October 1, 2007.

Current Boy Scout Councils of Connecticut

The small state of Connecticut has had its fair share of Boy Scouts of America councils since 1910 with a total of forty. Today the youth of Connecticut are proudly served by five Boy Scouts of America councils. Four councils (Connecticut Rivers, Connecticut Yankee, Greenwich, and Housatonic) are located within the state of Connecticut. The fifth, Narragansett Council in Rhode Island serves the youth in the community of Pawcatuck, Connecticut.

Connecticut Rivers Council is the largest of the four Connecticut based councils. It serves the youth in 127 communities, covering six and a half of the eight counties in Connecticut and Fishers Island, New York. Connecticut Yankee Council serves 37 communities which covers half of New Haven county and most of Fairfield counties. Housatonic Council serves 5 communities in the Naugatuck Valley region. Greenwich Council serves 1 Connecticut community, as well as several New York communities and is among the smallest councils in the United States.

These councils serve more than 61,700 boys, young men and young women in all facets of the scouting program. They are led by a volunteer group numbering well over 15,000 men and women. 627 young men were awarded their Eagle Badge in 2005.

In 2005 they gave the citizens of Connecticut well over 750,000 community service hours, ranging from eagle projects, to Scouting for Food to participating in the National Good Turn for America initiative.

The four Connecticut councils operate over 4,000 acres (16 km²) of camp grounds which served over 8,700 boys and girls in scouting, as well as several more thousands of non-scouts that use scout camps throughout the year.

Connecticut Rivers Council

Connecticut Rivers Council #066 of the Boy Scouts of America, headquarters located in East Hartford, Connecticut. The present council was formed as the result of the merger between the Indian Trails Council of Norwich, Connecticut and Long Rivers Council of Hartford, Connecticut. It is the largest council in the state with a youth membership of over 35,000 and a volunteer base of over 10,000 adults.

Connecticut Yankee Council

Connecticut Yankee Council #072 of the Boy Scouts of America, its headquarters is located in Milford, Connecticut. The present council was formed as the result of a 1998 merger between Quinnipiac Council and Fairfield County Council.

Greenwich Council

Greenwich Council, Boy Scouts of America was founded in 1912 and its headquarters reside in Greenwich.

It owns and operates the Ernest Thompson Seton Scout Reservation, a camp located off 363 Riversville Road in Greenwich, CT. Achewon Netopalis #427 is their Order of the Arrow lodge.

Housatonic Council

Housatonic Council #069, headquarters located in Derby, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Derby Council in 1923. At its annual meeting January 25, 1923 and the council voted to organize as a first class council to have jurisdiction over Scouting in Ansonia, Shelton and Seymour in addition to Derby. The territory was extended to include Oxford at a later date.

Past Boy Scout Councils of Connecticut

Alfred W. Dater Council

Alfred W. Dater Council #078, headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut. The council came about from a name change of Stamford Council in 1938. Alfred W. Dater served as the first president of the Stamford Council until his death in 1937. On December 2, 1938, in honor of his 22 years of service to Stamford Council, the council was renamed in his honor: Alfred W. Dater Council.

The council grew through the 1940’s and in 1947 John Sherman Hoyt donated 18 acres of land in Norwalk, Connecticut for use for short term camping. The camp was named Five Mile River Camp.

As Scouting was celebrating its 40th anniversary in February 1950, the council celebrated with the paying its last mortgage payment on Camp Toquam. The council reported that it was serving 3,269 boys and adults and plans to build their own Scout headquarters in Glenbrook section of Stamford, Connecticut. The building was sponsored by the Union Memorial Church and financed by donations from the Lions Club and by selling a portion of the Five Mile River Camp.

The purchase of the Williams Training Center in the late 1950s was made possible by the selling of the remaining portion of Five Mile River Camp. The Ponus Lodge #521 of the Order of the Arrow was established in 1956. The council celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1967 with 2,620 registered scouts.

In 1971 the council reported 3000 registered scouts and plans were being developed for the merger of the council in 1972. The Boy Scout councils of Alfred W. Dater, Mauwehu and Pomperaug voted to consolidate their operations into a new council. In 1972 the council ceased operations and the new council, Fairfield County Council began its history.

Ponus Lodge

Ponus Lodge #521 was the OA lodge for the Alfred W. Dater Council. Their name comes from the chief of the Rippowam Tribe. Their lodge totem is an "false face" Iroquois mask in the image of "Hoba Mako" (rough spelling). The lodge was founded in 1956 and ceased its operations when it merged with Chief Pomperaug #408 and Mauwehu #389 to form Tankiteke Lodge #313 in 1972.

Bridgeport Council

Bridgeport Council #065, headquartered in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Founded in 1915 and changed its name to Pomperaug Council in 1936.

Bristol Area Council

Bristol Area Council #066, headquartered in Bristol, Connecticut. Founded in 1918 and operated until it merged with Keemosabee Council to form Nathan Hale Council in 1967.

Woapalane Lodge

Woapalane Lodge #471 was the OA lodge for Bristol Council. Their name translates to “bald eagle” which is also their lodge totem. The lodge was founded in 1952 and ceased operations in 1967 when it merged with Keemosahbee #234 to form Wihungen #234.

Camp Cochipianee

The camp was founded in the 1928 by the Bristol Area Council. It was sold after Council mergers in 1972 which merged the New Britain Area Council and the Bristol Area Councils into what was then called Nathan Hale Council. The new council changed the name of New Britain's Camp Keemosabee into Camp Nahaco.

1n 1980? a program pavilion at Camp Nahaco was enclosed and insulated. This winter shelter was dedicated in the name of Camp Cochipianee. It shares the parade field with another winter shelter named after the former Camp Keemosabee.

Central Connecticut Council

Central Connecticut Council #071, headquartered in Meriden, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Meriden Council in 1929. The council ceased to operate in 1978, when it was absorbed by Quinnipiac Council.

  • Camp Terramuggus

Wangunks Lodge

Wangunks Lodge #274 was the OA lodge for the Central Connecticut Council. Their name translates to ‘bend in the river” (Algonquin). Their lodge totem is an American eagle. The lodge was absorbed into Arcoon Lodge #369 in 1978.

Central Fairfield Council

Central Fairfield Council #075, headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Norwalk Council in 1933.

Charter Oak Council

Charter Oak Council #070, headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Hartford Council in 1933. In 1972, the council ceased to exist when it merged with four other councils (Mattatuck, Middlesex County, Nathan Hale, and Tunxis) to form Long Rivers Council.

Wipunquoak Lodge #558 was the OA lodge for the Charter Oak Council. Their name translates to “white oak” (Lenape). Their lodge totem is the Charter Oak. The lodge was founded in 1964 and ceased operation when it merged with Kiethan #59, Mattatuck #217, Wihungen #234, and Tunxis #491 to form Eluwak #59 in 1973.

Lake of Isles Scout Reservation

The Lake of Isles Scout Reservation (LOISR) was developed by the Charter Oak Council and had its first summer camp season in 1960, the Jubilee Year of the Boy Scouts of America. Alan Tucker, the Charter Oak Council Executive, was the driving force behind the development of LOISR, and was its first Reservation Director. The plan was to develop four camps on the 1100-plus acres that surrounded Lake of Isles, located in North Stonington, Ledyard, and Preston townships of rural southeastern Connecticut. For 1960, Camps Pequot and Apache had been the only ones built. A third camp, Camp Cherokee, opened in 1970. This camp was designated an "Explorer Base" (although the Boy Scouting program was the only program that really used the Camp, as the Exploring program underwent drastic changes by the early 70s), and featured patrol cooking with a central commissary. The fourth camp never got beyond the planning stage.

Camp Pequot was the southernmost camp on the Reservation. It was mainly flat along the shoreline with a rapid rise of hills on the western side of the camp. It had a dining hall which served as many as 350 Scouts a week during the camp's heyday in the late 60s and early 70s. It was slightly smaller than Camp Apache, but not by much. The camp had an outdoor basketball court -- rather unusual for most camps. The camp had eight summer campsites originally. Down on the flat, it included Buccaneers, Aquanauts, Mohegan, Woodsmen, and Rocky Trails. The "higher elevation" campsites included Stockade, Bailey Hill, and Hickory Hill. Later, Blueberry Hill was developed. Even later, the staff's central campsite, near the dining hall, was converted to a campsite called Braves, and the staff lodging was dispersed so that they lived near their program areas. The Braves campsite was mainly used for boys who wanted to come to camp, but no adult leader from their troop could. The camp staff would "provide" the adult leadership, and thus the campsite was for what was known as the "provisional" troop.

The Charter Oak Council merged with four other councils in 1972 to form Long Rivers Council. By the mid-70s, with a declining Boy Scout-age demographic nationally and declining Boy Scout membership in general due to the expanding list of organizations for adolescent boys, Long Rivers Council was faced with shutting down a number of their camps to the summer camping experience. For instance, Camp Nahaco closed to regular summer camping after 1977 (although it would occasionally be open for long term camping with specialty themes, such as "Enviro-Camp"). Camp Tadma was closed in 1977, but in a couple of years re-opened as a long-term Webelos Camp. The plan for LOISR was to close Camp Pequot for two years and run Camp Apache for two years, then switch the status of the camps for the following two years. They expected this to reduce the impact of a summer camp season on the land by spreading out the wear and tear. So in 1975 and 1976, Camp Pequot was placed in "conservation status", and Camps Apache and Cherokee ran during those two summers. In 1977, Camp Apache was placed in conservation status, and Camp Pequot was reopened. However, for 1979, Long Rivers Council management changed its plan, and decided to keep Camps Pequot and Cherokee open permanently. By 1981, Camp Cherokee's patrol cooking operation was moved to Camp Pequot, as an option for troops who preferred this. Thus, while still a reservation of multiple camps, by the twenty-second year of operation of LOISR, only Camp Pequot remained as a summer camp.

The summer camp season also shortened as time went on. In the 1960s, both Pequot and Apache opened for eight weeks of summer camp use. By the mid-70s, it was down to six weeks for Camp Apache. By the late seventies, Camp Pequot was only open for summer camping three weeks out of the summer. With the closure of Camp Cherokee after the 1980 season, Camp Pequot's season expanded back to five weeks.

With the construction of the Mashantucket Pequot casino in 1991-1992, the natural beauty and surroundings had been destroyed enough to make Long Rivers Council consider selling the property to the Indian tribe, and this was done in 1992. The Mashantucket nation has since converted the land into a golf course.

Camp Apache – Lake of Isles Scout Reservation

The Lake of Isles Scout Reservation (LOISR) was developed by the Charter Oak Council and had its first summer camp season in 1960, the Jubilee Year of the Boy Scouts of America. Alan Tucker, the Charter Oak Council Executive, was the driving force behind the development of LOISR, and was its first Reservation Director. The plan was to develop four camps on the 1100-plus acres that surrounded Lake of Isles, located in North Stonington, Ledyard, and Preston townships. In 1960, Camps Apache and Pequot had been the only ones built. A third camp, Camp Cherokee, opened in 1970. This camp was designated an "Explorer Base" (although the Boy Scouting program was the only program that really used the Camp, as the Exploring program underwent drastic changes by the early 70s), and featured patrol cooking with a central commissary. The fourth camp never got beyond the planning stage.

Camp Apache had the largest capacity of the three camps, serving as many as 400 scouts a week at its height in the late 60s and early 70s. It had a large dining hall, and the huge Reservation chapel. It also was closest to the Reservation entrance, on the western shores of Lake of Isles. The Reservation family housing (on "Knob Hill") and the Reservation Health Lodge were also located in Camp Apache.

The Charter Oak Council merged with four other councils in 1972 to form Long Rivers Council. By the mid-70s, with a declining Boy Scout-age demographic nationally and declining Boy Scout membership in general due to the expanding list of organizations for adolescent boys, Long Rivers Council was faced with shutting down a number of their camps to the summer camping experience. Their plan for LOISR was to close Camp Pequot for two years and run Camp Apache for two years, then switch the status of the camps for the following two years. They expected this to reduce the impact of a summer camp season and spread out the wear and tear. So in 1975 and 1976, Camp Pequot was placed in "conservation status", and Camps Apache and Cherokee ran during those two summers. In 1977, Camp Apache was placed in conservation status, and Camp Pequot was reopened. However, for 1979, Long Rivers Council management changed its plan, and decided to keep Camps Pequot and Cherokee open permanently. Camp Apache would never again open as a Boy Scout Camp. It was occasionally rented by other groups, and Scouts would continue to use Camp Apache for short-term Camporees and other district events. However, the Reservation itself was not within the geographic boundary of Long Rivers Council, making other council camps closer to the council membership. Thus, Camp Apache was never used as much as it could have been.

With the construction of the Mashantucket Pequot casino in 1991-1992, the natural beauty and surroundings had been destroyed enough to make Long Rivers Council consider selling the property to the Indian tribe, and this was done in 1992. The Mashantucket nation has since converted the land into a golf course.

Camp Pequot – Lake of Isles Scout Reservation

The Lake of Isles Scout Reservation (LOISR) was developed by the Charter Oak Council and had its first summer camp season in 1960, the Jubilee Year of the Boy Scouts of America. Alan Tucker, the Charter Oak Council Executive, was the driving force behind the development of LOISR, and was its first Reservation Director. The plan was to develop four camps on the 1100-plus acres that surrounded Lake of Isles, located in North Stonington, Ledyard, and Preston townships of rural southeastern Connecticut. For 1960, Camps Pequot and Apache had been the only ones built. A third camp, Camp Cherokee, opened in 1970. This camp was designated an "Explorer Base" (although the Boy Scouting program was the only program that really used the Camp, as the Exploring program underwent drastic changes by the early 70s), and featured patrol cooking with a central commissary. The fourth camp never got beyond the planning stage.

Camp Pequot was the southernmost camp on the Reservation. It was mainly flat along the shoreline with a rapid rise of hills on the western side of the camp. It had a dining hall which served as many as 350 Scouts a week during the camp's heyday in the late 60s and early 70s. It was slightly smaller than Camp Apache, but not by much. The camp had an outdoor basketball court -- rather unusual for most camps. The camp had eight summer campsites originally. Down on the flat, it included Buccaneers, Aquanauts, Mohegan, Woodsmen, and Rocky Trails. The "higher elevation" campsites included Stockade, Bailey Hill, and Hickory Hill. Later, Blueberry Hill was developed. Even later, the staff's central campsite, near the dining hall, was converted to a campsite called Braves, and the staff lodging was dispersed so that they lived near their program areas. The Braves campsite was mainly used for boys who wanted to come to camp, but no adult leader from their troop could. The camp staff would "provide" the adult leadership, and thus the campsite was for what was known as the "provisional" troop.

The Charter Oak Council merged with four other councils in 1972 to form Long Rivers Council. By the mid-70s, with a declining Boy Scout-age demographic nationally and declining Boy Scout membership in general due to the expanding list of organizations for adolescent boys, Long Rivers Council was faced with shutting down a number of their camps to the summer camping experience. For instance, Camp Nahaco closed to regular summer camping after 1977 (although it would occasionally be open for long term camping with specialty themes, such as "Enviro-Camp"). Camp Tadma was closed in 1977, but in a couple of years re-opened as a long-term Webelos Camp. The plan for LOISR was to close Camp Pequot for two years and run Camp Apache for two years, then switch the status of the camps for the following two years. They expected this to reduce the impact of a summer camp season on the land by spreading out the wear and tear. So in 1975 and 1976, Camp Pequot was placed in "conservation status", and Camps Apache and Cherokee ran during those two summers. In 1977, Camp Apache was placed in conservation status, and Camp Pequot was reopened. However, for 1979, Long Rivers Council management changed its plan, and decided to keep Camps Pequot and Cherokee open permanently. By 1981, Camp Cherokee's patrol cooking operation was moved to Camp Pequot, as an option for troops who preferred this. Thus, while still a reservation of multiple camps, by the twenty-second year of operation of LOISR, only Camp Pequot remained as a summer camp.

The summer camp season also shortened as time went on. In the 1960s, both Pequot and Apache opened for eight weeks of summer camp use. By the mid-70s, it was down to six weeks for Camp Apache. By the late seventies, Camp Pequot was only open for summer camping three weeks out of the summer. With the closure of Camp Cherokee after the 1980 season, Camp Pequot's season expanded back to five weeks.

With the construction of the Mashantucket Pequot casino in 1991-1992, the natural beauty and surroundings had been destroyed enough to make Long Rivers Council consider selling the property to the Indian tribe, and this was done in 1992. The Mashantucket nation has since converted the land into a golf course.

Camp Cherokee – Lake of Isles Scout Reservation

The Lake of Isles Scout Reservation (LOISR) was developed by the Charter Oak Council and had its first summer camp season in 1960, the Jubilee Year of the Boy Scouts of America. Alan Tucker, the Charter Oak Council Executive, was the driving force behind the development of LOISR, and was its first Reservation Director. The plan was to develop four camps on the 1100-plus acres that surrounded Lake of Isles, located in North Stonington, Ledyard, and Preston townships of rural southeastern Connecticut. For the first summer camp season in 1960, Camps Pequot and Apache had been the only ones built. Camp Cherokee opened in 1970. This camp was designated an "Explorer Base" at first, and featured patrol cooking with a central commissary. The fourth camp never got beyond the planning stage.

The designation as an Explorer Base quickly disappeared, as Exploring became more vocationally-oriented in the early 1970s, especially in Connecticut with its Police Explorer Posts. Camp Cherokee was the only camp opened on the eastern shores of Lake of Isles. Lake of Isles itself was formed by damming a small stream whose name is lost to the ages. The original channel ran through the Camp Cherokee waterfront, making the drop-off between the non-swimmers' area and the beginners' area huge. At Camp Cherokee, campsites were further subdivided into patrol sites. Each patrol site had a shepherders stove and wall tents on wooden platforms with bunks and mattresses provided. Scouts would have to make the trek to the commissary three times a day to pick up food for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and then cook it themselves. This was the logical camp in the Council to hold Youth Leader Training, whether it was called JLTC, TLD, or TLTC, as it had the patrol cooking arrangements. There were six troop sites throughout all of Camp Cherokee's history: Sassafrass Hill, Timbertrails, Haven, Wilderness, Tunxis, and Pyquag. Camp Cherokee had all the usual program features for Scouting: A nature area, a waterfront, a place to practice scoutcraft, a rifle range, and an archery range. The lower part of the camp, along the Lake of Isles shoreline, included the campsite Tunxis, the nature area, and the waterfront. It was a steep climb up to the rest of the camp, which included the trading post/camp office and commissary and the other five campsites. Some needed amenities were provided at the Reservation level, such as a health lodge and lodging for families of married staff.

The Charter Oak Council merged with four other councils in 1972 to form Long Rivers Council. By the mid-70s, with a declining Boy Scout-age demographic nationally and declining Boy Scout membership in general due to the expanding list of organizations for adolescent boys, Long Rivers Council was faced with shutting down a number of their camps to the summer camping experience. In 1975 and 1976, Camp Pequot was placed in "conservation status", and Camps Cherokee and Apache ran during those two summers. After 1977, Camp Apache was placed in conservation status, and Camp Pequot was reopened. Camp Cherokee was open the same weeks as the other camps from 1970 until 1978, which allowed some friendly competition between camps on opposite sides of the lake, from softball games to a tug of war. Most popular was a battle between "war canoes", where two 12-plus person canoes, representing each camp, headed out on the lake, determined to swamp each other by splashing water into the opponents' canoe. Another favorite thing to do was to out-shout the other camp during campwide campfires on Sunday evening and Friday evening.

In 1979 and 1980, with continuing declining attendance, Camp Cherokee was open for only three weeks, followed by Camp Pequot for the next three weeks. This allowed the same staff to be hired for both camps. By 1981, Camp Cherokee's patrol cooking operation was moved to Camp Pequot, as an option for troops who preferred this. Thus, despite being the most modern facility on the Reservation, Camp Cherokee was closed for good as a Boy Scout summer camp.

With the construction of the Mashantucket Pequot casino in 1991-1992, the natural beauty and surroundings had been destroyed enough to make Long Rivers Council consider selling the property to the Indian tribe, and this was done in 1992. The Mashantucket nation has since converted the land into a golf course.

Camp Frontier

Camp Pioneer

Derby Council

Derby Council #069, headquartered in Derby, Connecticut. the first scout troop, Troop 1, was formed in Derby, CT in 1911. Derby Council was formed in 1918 as a Second Class Council. The council changed its name to Housatonic Council in 1923 when it became a First Class Council.

Eastern Connecticut Council

Eastern Connecticut Council #076, headquartered in Norwich, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of North New London Council in 1929. The council ceased operations when it merged with Pequot Council to create the Indian Trails Council in 1971.

Uncas Lodge

Uncas Lodge #297 was the OA lodge for the Eastern Connecticut Council. Their name comes from the son of Chigachgook. Their totem is a fox. The lodge ceased its operation with its merger with Samson Occum #338 to form Sassacus Lodge #10.

Camp Quinebaug

This camp was operated by the Eastern Connecticut Council from 1943-1963. It was sold and the operation was moved to the much larger June Norcross Webster Scout Reservation in 1964.
    The above statement is true but my recollections tell me that Camp Quinebaug was in operation before 1943.  As a Scout from the Sterling, Ct. Scout Troop, I attended Camp Quinebaug in the summer of 1934. In 1935 I attended a shake down camp there for the National Boy Scout Jamboree which was canceled because of the Polio Epedimic. In 1936, 1937, 1938, and 1939 I served on the Camp Staff of Camp Quinebaug. A new dining hall was built in the spring of 1938 and I came directly from college to help finish the floor in it to be ready for the camp season. The Camp Director during these years was George W. Goodrich who was also the Scout Executive of the Eastern Connecticut Council BSA. It was at Camp Quinebaug and the leadership of Chief Goodrich that I chose a professional career as a Boy Scout Executive where I was able to serve in 4 different Councils.
    The land where Camp Quinebaug was located is now a Recreational Vehicle Park known as Hidden Acres Family Camp Ground.
    Camp Quinebaug has many wonderful memories for me and I am deeply indebted for it's influence on my life so many years ago.
                         Henry H. McGinty,
                         abitex@yahoo.com

Fairfield County Council

Fairfield County Council #068, headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut was created in 1972 with the merger of three councils: Mauwehu, Pomperaug and Alfred W. Dater. The council ceased operations when it merged with Quinnipiac Council to form Connecticut Yankee Council in 1998.

Camp Aquila

Located in Sherman CT Owned by Fairfield County Council Home of Tankiteke OA lodge

Tankiteke Lodge

Tankiteke Lodge #313 was the OA lodge of Fairfield County Council. Their name translates to “those of slight stature”. Their lodge totem is a hoop of the universe. The lodge was created 1973 with the merger of Chief Pomperaug Lodge #408, Mauwehu Lodge #389 and Ponus Lodge #521. In July 1972 the three lodges meet to discuss merger plans. After several months of discussion, the three lodges held a tri-lodge dinner in December 1972. The membership voted on a new name, lodge totem, new lodge by-laws and it’s first set of lodge officers. The new lodge was chartered in January 1973.

There were originally five chapters, corresponding to the six council districts: Owenoke (Stamford district); Pequot (Nutmeg District); Saganaw (Sachem and Oronoque districts) Sasqua (Sasqua district) and Scatacook (Scatacook district). In 1980 Sasqua and Owenoke chapters were merged to form Powahay chapter.

A dance team was formed in the Owenoke chapter and performed for local scouting units, local lodges and appeared on local television report. The group won several competitions at yearly section conclaves.

The lodge was also very active on the local sections, having their members elected to section officer positions. The can boast that one of its members was elected Northeast Region chief of the Order of the Arrow.

The lodge ceased to operate when it merged with Arcoon Lodge #369 to form Owaneco Lodge #313 in 1999.

Hartford Council

Hartford Council #070, headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut. Founded in 1915 and changed its name to Charter Oak Council in 1933.

Indian Trails Council

Indian Trails Council #073, headquartered in Norwich, Connecticut, was formed with the merger of the Pequot Council and the Eastern Connecticut Council in October 1971. The council owned several camps during its existence: Camp Wakenah (sold in 2004), Cochegan Rock (sold in 2006 to the Mohegan Tribe), Camp Quinebaug (sold in 1965), and June Norcross Webster Scout Reservation. The council's Order of the Arrow Lodge was the Sassacus Lodge #10. The Districts were Quinebaug, Natchaug, Mohegan, and Pequot. On January 1, 1995 the Indian Trails Council (Norwich) merged with the Long Rivers Council (Hartford) to form the Connecticut Rivers Council #66 (East Hartford).

Scout Executives of ITC J. Lawrence Deveau (1971-1975) Anthony Booth (1976-1984) Lawrence V. Pegg (1985-1995)

Sassacus Lodge

Sassacus Lodge #10 was the OA lodge of the Indian Trails Council. Their name comes from Sassacus who was a Pequot Chieftain. Their totem is a war club. The lodge was created by the merger of Uncas #297 and Samson Occum #388 in 1971. The lodge received its first charter under its new name on January 1, 1972 and ceased operation in 1995 when it merged with Eluwak #59 to form Tschitani #10. In the fall of 1995 a joint lodge conclave with Eluwak #59 was held at June Norcross Webster Scout Reservation in Ashford. This was the last event that Sassacus Lodge #10 held. On September 17, 1995, the membership of both lodges voted in a new lodge name, totem, by-laws and slate of officers.

Camp Hammond Mill

Keemosahbee Council

Keemosahbee Council #073, headquartered in New Britain, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of New Britain Council in 1953. In 1967 the council ceased to exist when it merged with the Bristol Council to form the Nathan Hale Council.

Keemosahbee Lodge #234 was the OA lodge for the New Britain Council (1943-1953) until the council changed its name to Keemosahbee Council. The totem is a winged teal. The lodge was founded in 1943 and ceased operations when it merged with Woapalane #471 to form Wihungen #234

Camp Keemosahbee

Camp Keemosahbee strattles the Eastford/Woodstock line on Crystal Lake. It was operated by the Keemosahbee Council since 1916, which served the New Britain area, until the council merged to become the Nathan Hale Council in 1972. It operated under the Keemosahbee name until it was renamed Nahaco to reflect the new council (Nathan Hale Council). The three combinations of the camp's name and council are represented in the main dining hall as enlarged wooden versions of the camp patches. Other amenities, such as the camp's chapel and one of 3 winter shelter, reflect its original Keemosabee name. The camp distinguished itself from others in Connecticut by using permanent Klondike style shelters in lieu of the more common canvas platform tents.

After a series of council mergers the camp came into the ownership of the Connecticut Rivers Council, which hosted a Junior Leader Training Camp and a water sports merit badge camp at the site, until it was sold in 2003 to the towns of Eastford and Woodstock. The towns have permanently preserved of the camp's sparsely delevoped woodlands for hiking and camping, while maintaining the remaining land along Crystal lake (including the camp center, sports field, dining hall and other camp buildings) for rental, picnicking, and sports use. The Camp Nahaco Commission, which operates the camp on behalf of the two towns, also hosts a day camp program for area children.

According to the town of Eastford website, the commission is dedicated to maintaining Camp "Nahaco and its facilities" and "preserving the natural beauty [that] Camp Nahaco affords".

Also see Woodstock Conservation Commission for further information about the camp's preservation and Eastford Recreation Page for policy information on use of Nahaco's facilities.

Long Rivers Council

Long Rivers Council #066, headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut. The council was formed in 1972 with the merger of five councils (Charter Oak, Mattatuck, Middlesex County, Nathan Hale, and Tunxis). The council then merged with Indian Trails Council in 1995 to create the Connecticut Rivers Council.
Eluwak Lodge
Eluwak Lodge #59 was the OA lodge of Long Rivers Council. Their name translates to “most powerful one” (Lenape). Their totem is five rivers merging. The lodge was created in 1973 from the merger of Kiehtan #59, Mattatuck #217, Wihungen #234, Tunxis #491, and Wipanquoak #558. The lodge ceased its operation in 1995 with its merger with Sassacus #10 to form Tschitani #10.

Manchester Township Council

Manchester Township Council #068, headquartered in Manchester, Connecticut. Founded in 1917, the council ceased operations in 1925.

Mattatuck Council

Mattatuck Council #080, headquartered in Waterbury, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Waterbury Council in 1935. In 1935 the council absorbed Naugatuck Council. In 1972, the council ceased to exist when it merged with four other councils (Charter Oak, Middlesex County, Nathan Hale, and Tunxis) to form Long Rivers Council.

Mattatuck Lodge #217 was the OA lodge for Mattatuck Council. Their name translate to “land of few trees” (Algonquin). The lodge totem is an arrowhead with crossed arrows. The lodge was founded in 1942 and ceased operations in 1973 with the merger of Kiehtan #59, Wihungen #234, Tunxis #491, and Wipunquoak #558 to form Eluwak #59.

Camp Mattatuck

Camp Mattatuck is located in Plymouth, Connecticut. Mattatuck Council, Boy Scouts of America purchased in 1938 and the camp opened in 1939. The original included wooded areas, open fields and Lake Kenosha. The first campsites were built overlooking the lake on the west. Additional properties were purchased to comprise the 500 acre (2 km²) camp today. Camp Mattatuck offers a wide variety of activities for the Scouts notably including (but not limited to) rock climbing, sail boating, canoing, kayaking, rifle and shotgun shooting, swimming, and lifesaving.
The camp is used to host a Cub Scout Day Camp and the resident Boy Scout camp and serves about 1,000 boy scouts and 500 cub scouts each summer. Six cabins on the camp grounds allow for winter camping.

Camp Morris Buck

Camp Pershing

Mauwehu Council

Mauwehu Council #075, headquartered in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Mid Fairfield Council in 1952. The council ceased operations when it merged with two other councils to create Fairfield County Council in 1972.

Mauwehu Lodge #389 was the OA lodge for the Mauwehu Council. Their name comes from a chief of a local Indian tride. Their totem was the gray wolf. The lodge was founded in 1948 and ceased its operations when it merged with Chief Pomperaug #408 and Ponus #521 to form Tankiteke Lodge #313 in 1972.

Tuccio Scout Camp

Camp built in Ridgefield, Connecticut on land donated by Jerry Tuccio on land he had once considered developing on Pine Mountain Road.

Meriden Council

Meriden Council #071, headquartered in Meriden, Connecticut. Founded in 1915 and changed its name to Central Connecticut Council in 1929.

Mid Fairfield Council

Mid Fairfield Council #075, headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Central Fairfield Council in 1935.

Middlesex County Council

Middlesex County Council #674, headquartered in Middletown, Connecticut. Founded in 1924 and ceased its operation when the council merged with four other councils (Charter Oak, Mattatuck, Nathan Hale and Tunxis) to form Long Rivers Council in 1972.

  • White Mountain Camp
  • Camp Kiehtan, 1930's and 1940's at various locations
  • Camp Tadma (also known as the Mark Greer Scout Reservation), 1947-1972

Kiehtan Lodge

Wahquimacut Lodge #59 was the OA lodge for Middlesex County Council. Their lodge totem was a pine tree. The lodge was founded in 1931 but disbanded for a number of years before rechartering in 1957 as Kiehtan #59.

Kiehtan Lodge #59 was the OA lodge of Middlesex County Council. Their name translates to “spirit of the southwest” (Natick). Their totem is of a Native American feeding a beaver. The lodge was founded in 1931 as Wahquimacut, but disbanded for a number of years before rechartering in 1957 as Kiehtan. In 1973 the lodge merged with Mattatuck #217, Wihungen #234, Tunxis #491, and Wipanquoak #558 to form Eluwak #59.

Nathan Hale Council

Nathan Hale Council #072, headquartered in New Britain, Connecticut. The council came about from a merger of Bristol Council and Keemosahbee Council in 1967. The council ceased operations when it merged with four other councils (Charter Oak, Mattatuck, Middlesex County, and Tunxis) to form Long Rivers Council in 1972.

Wihungen Lodge

Wihungen Lodge #234 was the OA lodge for the Nathan Hale Council. Their name translates to “to sacrifice”. The lodge totem is a Grand Union flag. The lodge was created from the merger of Keemosahbee #234 and Woapalane #471 in 1968. The lodge ceased its operation in 1973 with its merger of Kiehtan #59, Mattatuck #217, Tunxis #491, and Wipunquoak #558 to from Eluwak #59.

Camp Nahaco

The camp was founded in the 1916, as Camp Keemosabee, by the New Britain Area Council. Located on Weeks Road on the banks of Crystal Pond, in both Eastford and Woodstock, Connecticut, the camp was the scout camp for four different councils over its long history: originally New Britain Area Council, then Nathan Hale Council, Long Rivers Council, and finally Connecticut Rivers Council. A feature most remembered of the camp is its lagoon, separated from the rest of Crystal Pond by the Causeway (bridge) and the points of the Scout Law painted on the steps at the beach that lead to the swimming area.

The merge of two former councils (the New Britain Area Council and the Bristol Area Council) into the Nathan Hale Council in 1968 come up with the amalgomy of Camp NAthan HAle COuncil - NA-HA-CO : NAHACO. The entrance gate truss pattern spells out NAHACO. By 1972 the Nathan Hale Council became Nathan Hale District, but the camp still enjoyed keeping the name Nahaco in the newly formed Long Rivers Council.

A program pavilion was soon converted to a winter shelter that bears the name of Keemosabee. In 1981, another program pavilion, that shares the parade field with the Keemosabe Shelter, was converted to a winter shelter and named in honor of Camp Cochipianee, which had been sold by the new large, 13-district, Long Rivers Council. In the 1990s, when the Highland District's fundraising put a lot of time and money into Nahaco, with improvements of updating the Dining Hall kitchen with all new stainless steel, the 3rd, and final, program activity pavilion was converted to a winter shelter, thusly named the Highland Shelter. The deteriorated camp office was razed at that time as well.

Nahaco saw its last year as a full summer camp facility in 1977. Although several Specialty Camp weeks were run at the camp since 1977, it never regained its fulltime summer camp use. It always was a favorite place for winter camping up until the mid 2000's.

A referendum vote was held by the towns of Woodstock and Eastford to approved the purchase Camp Nahaco from Connecticut Rivers Council. The referendum, held on October 16, 2002, approved the plan and on March 3, 2003 the camp became town property. The two towns shared in the $560,000.00 purchase price. Today, are now permanently protected from development and the Boy Scouts still have use of the property.

Please see Camp Keemosabee (a previous name) for additional information.

Naugatuck Council

Naugatuck Council #072, headquartered in Naugatuck, Connecticut. Founded in 1917, the council ceased operations when it was absorbed with Waterbury Council to form the Mattatuck Council in 1935.

New Britain Council

New Britain Council #073, headquartered in New Britain, Connecticut. Founded in 1916 and changed its name to Keemosahbee Council in 1953.

  • Camp Heinzman

New Haven Council

New Haven Council #074, headquartered in New Haven, Connecticut. With the Scouting movement starting in 1910, the New Haven Register reported on August 21, 1910 that the Lion and the Arrow Patrols were forming. New Haven Mayor Frank Rice, City Librarian Willis Stetson and Judge Albert McClellan Matthewson strongly supported the scouting movement and in 1912 founded the New Haven Council of the Boy Scouts of America. In 1913 the council was reorganized as a Second Class Council. Two years later, in 1915, the council was incorporated as a First Class Council and hired Gilbert N. Jerome as the first Scout Executive. In 1929 the council changed its name to Southern New Haven County Council.¹

New London Council

New London Council #077, headquartered in New London, Connecticut. Founded in 1918 and the name was changed to South New London County in 1923. In 1929 the name was changed back to New London Council and remained until a name change in 1935 to Pequot Council.

North New London Council

North New London Council #076, headquartered in Norwich, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Norwich Council in 1922 and changed its name again to Eastern Connecticut Council in 1929

Northern Litchfield Council

Northern Litchfield Council #079, headquartered in Torrington, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Torrington Council in 1929. In 1947 the council name was changed to Tunxis.

Norwalk Council

Norwalk Council #075, headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut. Founded in 1917 and changed its name to Central Fairfield Counicl in 1933.

Norwich Council

Norwich Council #076, headquartered in Norwich, Connecticut. Founded in 1917 and changed its name to North New London Council in 1922.

  • Camp Tippecan

Pequot Council

Pequot Council #077, headquartered in New London, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change to New London Council in 1935. The council ceased its operations on October 1, 1971 with its merger with Eastern Connecticut Council to form Indian Trails Council.

Camp Cochegan

Camp Cochegan, also known as Cochegan Rock and Becker Memorial Scout Reservation, was a 92 acres camp that was donated to the Pequot Council in 1963 by the family of Nathan and Ida Becker. The reservation has also been operated by the Indian Trails Council and most recently by the Connecticut Rivers Council. Cochegan Rock is believed to be the largest freestanding boulder in New England, long, high and wide, and weighs 10,000 tons.

The property has been transferred to the Mohegan tribe, in exchange for a $1,000,000 contribution to the council’s Capital Campaign.. Tribal officials consider the rock an important piece of their heritage. 350 years ago, chief Uncas, who founded the Mohegan tribe and made peace with the colonists, may have held tribal councils there.

Samson Occum Lodge

Samson Occum Lodge #388 was the OA lodge for the Pequot Council. Their name comes from Sanson Occum a Mohegan Indian and an ordained Presbyterian minister. Their totem is a profile of a Mohegan Indian with a single feather.

Camp Wakenah

Camp Wakenah is the Boy Scouts of America's second oldest camp (however the source of this claim is questioned). It was founded in around 1917 on Gardner Lake in Salem, Connecticut. The property was sold in the 1930s to buy the second Camp Wakenah at a different location on Gardner Lake which consisted of 34 acres.

In 1971 the Pequot Council (New London) merged with the Eastern Connecticut Council (Norwich) into the Indian Trails Council which had its office in New London. 1972 was the last Resident Camp season for Camp Wakenah, Its resident operation was moved to the larger June Norcross Webster Scout Reservation in Ashford. Despite the loss of the resident program, Wakenah was still used by troops for weekend camping and district events. The location was also used for a four week cub scout day camp program. Connecticut Rivers Council sold the property in 2004. Some in the area resented the sale for private use after the council had originally planned to sell the property to the town of Salem for $500,000.00. A bidding war resulted in the final $1,000,000.00 selling price.

The day camp program was moved to Camp Wakenah's new site in the Mark Greer Scout Reservation in Bozrah. The new site is located west of Camp Tadma on the common property, separated by the parking lot. Its parade field is near the top of the pine covered hill to the right of the property's main entrance. The parade field sits in a clearing that was originally made as a campsite. It was expanded to make room for a BB and Archery range for the day camp. Camp Wakenah "III" also makes use of a newly constructed modular home that serves as its administrative building and the existing Tadma Fort.

Pomperaug Council

Pomperaug Council #065, headquartered in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Bridgeport Council in 1936. The council ceased operations when it merged with two other councils to create Fairfield County Council in 1972.

  • Camp Scoutland
  • Camp Mauwehu

Chief Pomperaug Lodge

Chief Pomperaug Lodge #408 was the OA lodge for the Pomperaug Council. Their name comes from Chief Pomperaug of the Pootatuck Indian. Their lodge totem is a panther.. The lodge was founded in 1949 and ceased operations when it merged with Mauwehu #389 and Ponus #521 to form Tankiteke Lodge #313 in 1972.

Quinnipiac Council

Quinnipiac Council #074, headquartered in New Haven, Connecticut until 1961 when it moved to Hamden, CT. Council came about from a name change of Southern New Haven County Council in 1935. The name Quinnipiac comes from the Indian tribe which occupied the area.

Originally formed in 1912 as the New Haven Council of the Boy Scouts of America, its headquarters was located in New Haven, Connecticut. After years of growth and expanding outside the boundaries of New Haven, the council name was changed to Southern New Haven County Council in 1929. In 1935 the council name was changed to Quinnipiac Council. The council absorbed the Central Connecticut Council in 1978. In 1997 the council voted to merge with Fairfield County Council. After 75 years in existence, the council ceased its operation on January 1, 1998 and became part of the Connecticut Yankee Council.

The council is most notable for its operation, which was a model for the rest of country. In 1943, Elbert K. Fretwell, Chief Scout Executive of the BSA described Quinnipiac Council as an example to councils all over America for the high quality of the scouting program being provided. Camp Sequassen was rated a double A camp. In 1962 the council hosted the first of many successful International Camporees. On July 4, 1962, scouts from 14 countries assembled at Camp Sequassen.

Scout Camp: During its existence, the Quinnipiac Council owned the follow camps: Camp Sequassen, New Hartford, Connecticut, Deer Lake Scout Reservation, Killingworth, Connecticut, Old Settlers Scout Reservation, Milford, Connecticut, Wah Wah Tayysee Scout Reservation, Hamden, Connecticut

Order of the Arrow: This council was served by Arcoon Lodge #369 of the Order of the Arrow.

Chi Sigma Lodge

Chi Sigma Lodge #369 was the original OA lodge for Quinnipiac Council. Chi Sigma started in the Quinnipiac Council in 1934 has a scout Camp Honor Society. There was never a totem developed for the lodge. When the Boy Scouts of America began encouraging local councils to switch from their honor societies to the Order of the Arrow, the membership voted to organize had Chi Sigma Lodge in 1947. The lodge was assigned the number 369. In 1951 the lodge changed its name to Arcoon.

Arcoon Lodge

Arcoon Lodge #369 was the OA lodge for Quinnipiac Council. Lodge was formerly known as Chi Sigma, when it changed its name in 1953. The name translates to "raccoon" (Algonquin). Their totem was a raccoon with a feather.

During the 1940s, the Boy Scouts of America began encouraging local scout council to switch from their separate honor groups to Order of the Arrow Lodges. During the 1947 camp season, the membership of Chi Sigma voted to install an Order of the Arrow Lodge. The name Chi Sigma was retained rather than an Indian name in honor of Sam Bogan, founder of the earlier organization.

Final approval was obtained from the National Order of the Arrow and the Quinnipiac Council Board of Directors and the Lodge was assigned Number 369 and the name Chi Sigma Lodge on November 19, 1947. On Monday evening, December 29, a formal installation of the lodge was held at the Council offices.

Eager to learn more about what the Order of the Arrow was and how it could better serve the scouts of the council, lodge leadership attended an area meeting at Camp Collier in New Hampshire in 1951. Brothers from area lodges were exchanging patches with their lodge totems on them. A committee was formed in 1951 to look for an appropriate symbol for the new lodge. Many animals of the north eastern woods were considered for a totem. A selection committee finally came up with the suggestion that the raccoon be used. All agreed as the pesky raccoon was a friend to all campers at Camp Sequassen - being a frequent visitor to camp sites and food boxes. Having chosen an appropriate animal as a totem for the lodge, the committee turned to finding a new name - symbolic of Indian background of the Order of the Arrow. After careful research the word “Arcoon”, an Algonquian Indian (Arkoon) word for raccoon was recommended. The committee liked the name and felt it was suitable for the lodge. The committee voted to accept both new name for the lodge and the raccoon as its totem. A contest was set up for a patch design that would best represent the new totem. With the lodge having a new name and totem, application was made to the National Order of the Arrow Secretary for a name change. Final approval was received in late 1951. Chi Sigma Lodge was officially renamed Arcoon Lodge #369.

In 1977, Quinnipiac Council absorbed the operations of Central Connecticut Council. Their lodge, Wangunks Lodge #274 was also absorbed in the operations of Arcoon Lodge #369 and became a chapter.

Arcoon Lodge received numerous awards and recognition for its dance team during its history. The lodge received National Standard Lodge status numerous times, as well as garnering the E. Urner Goodman Camping Award in 1978. Many Lodge Offices went on to serve on Section Committees and Section Offices.

In 1998, Quinnipiac Council and Fairfield County Council voted to merge the two councils to create the Connecticut Yankee Council. Arcoon Lodge #369 was merged with Tankiteke Lodge #313 to form Owaneco Lodge #313 of the Connecticut Yankee Council in 1999.

Old Settlers Scout Reservation

In 1955 Mrs. William J. Garland sold of land in Milford, Connecticut to Quinnipiac Council. The camp was used for short term camping and Cub Scout day camp.

South New London County Council

South New London County Council #077, headquartered in New London, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change to New London Council in 1923. In 1929 the council name was changed back to New London Council.

Southern New Haven County Council

Southern New Haven County Council #074, headquartered in New Haven, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of the New Haven Council in 1929. The change was to represent the geography of the council. Though a county system of government was not used in Connecticut, the name was used to represent the geography of the council. In 1935 the council name was changed to Quinnipiac Council.¹

Stamford Council

Stamford Council #078, headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut. An article in the Stamford Advocate, 1941 Tercentenary Edition, stated that on March 22, 1912 the city's first Boy Scout Troop was being formed at the St. John's Episcopal Church, Troop 5. By 1918, unofficial Wolf Cub packs appeared in Stamford.

As with most early Boy Scout Councils, they usually formed after local organizations started organizing scout troops. Local citizens meet on March 23, 1917 to discuss Scouting in both Stamford, Connecticut and Darien, Connecticut. In June, their application to the Boy Scouts of America was accepted and the Stamford Council was born.

The council opened its first camp on property in Long Ridge during the summer of 1920. In 1922, the council camp, now named Camp Toquam was located in Hunting Ridge on Holly's Pond and moved two years later moved to property in Ridgefield, Connecticut. The council became incorporated on March 6, 1924.

During 1926 and 1927, plans were developed to buy property for a larger camp ground. Camp Toquam opened its 1928 season on the Shores of Dog Pond in Goshen, Connecticut. In 1937, Alfred W. Dater died. Dater was council president from the first day and was instrumental in the organization of Boy Scouts in Stamford, Connecticut. On December 2, 1938, the Stamford Council was renamed in his honor as the Alfred W. Dater Council.

Five Mile River Camp

In 1947John Sherman Hoyt gave the Council 18 acres in Norwalk to be called the Five Mile River Camp used for short term camping.

Camp Toquam

  • stamfordhistory.org

Torrington Council

Torrington Council #079, headquartered in Torrington, Connecticut. Founded in 1918 and changed its name to Northern Litchfield Council in 1929.

Workcoeman Scout Reservation

Camp Workcoeman was established in 1924, and it is one of the oldest continuously operating Scout camps in the country. For 83 years, thousands of Scouts and leaders have had unforgettable Scouting experiences at Camp Workcoeman. This fine tradition of Scouting continues today.

Tunxis Council

Tunxis Council #079, headquartered in Torrington, Connecticut. Council came about from a name change of Northern Litchfield Council in 1947. In 1972, the council ceased to exist when it merged with four other councils (Charter Oak, Mattatuck, Middlesex COunty, and Nathan Hale) to form Long Rivers Council.

Tunxis Lodge

Tunxis Lodge #491 was the OA lodge for the Tunxis Council. Their name translates to “little river” (Algonquin). Their lodge totem is a thunderbird. The lodge was founded in 1953 and ceased operations when it merged in 1973 with Kiehtan #59, Mattatuck #217, Wihungen #234, and Wipunquoak #558 to form Eluwak #59.

Waterbury Council

Waterbury Council #080, headquartered in Waterbury, Connecticut. Founded in 1915 and ceased to exist when it merged with the Naugatuck Council to form the Mattatuck Council in 1935.

  • Camp Sepunkum

Current Girl Scout Councils of Connecticut

The state of Connecticut has had its share of Girl Scouts of the USA councils since 1912. There were 53 councils that have served the state. Today the youth of Connecticut are proudly served by one council.

Girl Scouts of Connecticut

Girl Scouts of Connecticut is headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut. Girl Scouts of Connecticut

Camp Timber Trails

Camp Timber Trails is a resident camp owned by the Girl Scouts of Connecticut and located in the Berkshire Mountains of southwestern Massachusetts in the town of Tolland. Timber Trails was opened in 1968 and has many buildings that are winterized and can be used for year round camping. It offers standard programs in aquatics (swimming, sailing, canoeing, rowing, kayaking, and funyaking), arts & crafts, low ropes challenge course, archery, drama/theatre, hiking and biking along with a variety of specialized programs that are added from year to year. It has a stable that is fit to accommodate 20 horses, which are cared for by campers and staff throughout the summer sessions. Throughout the year, the camp is maintained by a camp ranger and assistant ranger who reside on property.

Camp Aspetuck

Camp Aspetuck is located on 16 acres of wooded land in Weston, Connecticut. Founded in 1939 on 12 arces, a gift from Gustav Pfeiffer to Aspetuck Council. In 1950 the council purchased 4 additional acres. Since 1947, a summer day camp has been running almost continuously, just missing two seasons (1972 and 1973). Camp Aspetuck, contains two swimming pools, a wetland nature trail, an outdoor cooking shelter, two program shelters, A-frames and platform tents for 3-season camping, and Conway Cabin for year-round camping and program use. The camp presently belongs to the Girl Scout Council of Southwestern Connecticut and is still in operations.

Camp Candlewood

Camp Candlewood is located on the shores of Lake Candlewood in New Fairfield, Connecticut. The 90 acre property was purchased in 1959 by the Girl Scout Council of Southwestern Connecticut. The newly formed council was eager to obtain a camp area that provided a waterfront. Lake Candlewood was created in 1932 by the Connecticut Light and Power Company as a power reservoir. The council brought in the Girl Scout National Camp Consultants and it was decided to develop both a Day Camp and a Resident Camp at the site.

Because the council had lost its day camp program at Camp Fairlee to a housing development in Danbury, Connecticut, it was decided to develop the site for a new day camp program. A road to the beach was bulldozed and the Candleberry Shelter was built prior to the opening of Day Camp in 1960.

In 1961 the Development Committee started on the Resident Camp. The first building was the Shelter (Yar-Sloop), and in 1962 Seniors camped in Roundup tents at what is now known as "Quite a Hill!" 1963 saw the infirmary built. It served as staff house, infirmary, and kitchen for supplies. Sailboats were purchased and the first boating docks were put in. In 1964 saw additional buildings built; the Catamaran Shelter, Administration building (the Bridge), and showers. The Galley was added in 1965 and the Boathouse followed in 1968.

Camp Francis

Camp Francis is located in Kent, Connecticut and is one of the oldest Girl Scout Camps in the country. Purchased around 1922 from Eli C. Barnum, the camp sits upon 265 "spectacular acres" near the Blue Heron Pond.

The property has vast trails, streams and brooks, a waterfall, and Blue Heron Pond for swimming and boating. The camp was used for summer resident camp but recently it has been used only for primitive camping.

Camp Rocky Craig

Camp Rock Craig is located in Stamford, Connecticut. In 1963 the Girl Scout Council of Southwestern Connecticut began a search for camp that was closer to Stamford and the towns they serve. 26 acres of land was purchased in 1964 in Stamford, Connecticut and a shelter was immediately built on the property. In 1965 a summer camp was opened. The council camping committee had requested funding to have the meadow drained with final approval being received in 1973. Bulldozers began clearing and dredging the land and with the help of volunteer Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, and adults the meadow was completed. The property has rocks for climbing as well as trails, ponds and other camp related facilities and is still in used today.

Camp Laurel

Camp Laurel is located in Lebanon, Connecticut.

Camp Iwakta

Camp Iwakta, located in Norfolk, Connecticut, is available for troop camping on a year-round basis.

Camp Katoya

Camp Katoya, located in Milford, Connecticut is the site of summer day camp program and is used in other months for troop (short term) camping activities.

Past Girl Scout Councils of Connecticut

  • Ansonia Council of Girl Scouts
  • Aspetuck Area Girl Scout Council
  • Blue Trails Council of Girl Scouts
  • Bridgeport Girl Scout Council
  • Bristol Girl Scouts
  • Central Litchfield County Girl Scout Council
  • Cheshire Council of Girl Scouts
  • Connecticut Trails Council of Girl Scouts
  • Connecticut Valley Girl Scout Council
  • Connecticut Yankee Council of Girl Scouts
  • Danbury Area Council of Girl Scouts
  • Derby-Shelton Girl Scout Council
  • Enfield Community Committee Girl Scout Council
  • Girl Scout Council of Eastern Connecticut
  • Girl Scout Council of the Fortynightly Club of Madison Conn
  • Girl Scout Council of Fairfield County
  • Girl Scout Council of Naugatuck and Beacon Falls
  • Girl Scout Council of Northwestern Connecticut
  • Girl Scout Council of Southwestern Connecticut
  • Girl Scouts, Connecticut Trails Council
  • Girl Scouts of Housatonic Council
  • Glastonbury Girl Scout Council
  • Greater Hartford Girl Scouts
  • Guilford Girl Scout Council
  • Greenwich Council of Girl Scouts
  • Hartford Girl Scout Council
  • Laurel Trail Council of Girl Scouts
  • Manchester Girl Scouts
  • Meriden Girl Scout Council
  • Middletown and Portland Girl Scout Council
  • Middletown Girl Scout Council
  • Milford Council of Girl Scouts
  • New Britain Council of Girl Scouts
  • New Haven Council of Girl Scouts
    • Camp Rolawila - Was operated by the New Haven Girl Scout Council and was located at Silver Sands in East Haven, Connecticut (1927)
  • New London Council of Girl Scouts
  • Norwalk Girl Scout Association
  • Norwich Girl Scout Council
  • Old Saybrook Girl Scout Council
  • Ridgefield Girl Scout Council
  • Stafford Springs Girl SScout Community Committee
  • Stamford Area Association of Girl Scouts
  • Stonington Connecticut Girl Scout Council
  • Thompsville Community Committee of Girl Scouts
  • Torrington-Litchfield Girl Scout Council
  • Upper Middlesex Area Council
  • Wallingford Girl Scout Council
  • Waterbury Area Council of Girl Scouts
  • Waterbury Council of Girl Scouts
  • Watertown Council of Girl Scouts
  • Westport Girl Scouts
  • Willimantic Council of Girl Scouts
  • Wilton Connecticut Girl Scouts
  • Winsted Area Girl Scouts

These camps need to be placed under the apprporiate council:

  • Camp An-Se-Ox
  • Camp Carlson
  • Camp Clutter Valley
  • Camp Iwakta
  • Camp Katoya
  • Camp Maria Pratt
  • Camp Merri Wood
  • Camp Murray
  • Camp Pattagansett
  • Camp Timber Trails

See also

External links

References

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