Tree stump

Tree stump

After a tree has been cut and felled, the stump or tree stump is usually a small remaining portion of the trunk with the roots still in the ground. Stumps may show the age-defining rings of a tree. The study of these rings is known as dendochronology.

Regeneration

Stumps (both those on the ground and stumps of removed branches) are sometimes able to regenerate into new trees. Often, a deciduous tree that has been cut will re-sprout in multiple places around the edge of the stump or from the roots. Depending on whether the tree is being removed permanently or whether the forest is expected to recover, this can be either desirable or undesirable. Stump sprouts can grow very quickly and sometimes become viable trees themselves either for aesthetics or timber, due to the existing root structure; however, the cut portion of the trunk may weaken the sprouts and introduce disease into the newly forming tree(s).

The process of deliberately cutting stumps to regenerate into smaller trees is known as coppicing.

Stump removal

Tree stumps can be very difficult to remove from the ground. They can be dug out, shredded with a stump grinder, cut away with special chemicals or burnt.

See also

Living stump

Coppicing

External links

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