Definitions

trading ban

List of B-17 Flying Fortress operators

Military operators of the B-17

Civil operators of the B-17

The Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress was among the first mass-produced four-engined heavy bombers. A total of more than 12,000 were made, making its use as a heavy bomber second only to the B-24 Liberator. Though used at some point in all theatres of World War II, it was most common in the European Theatre, where its lack of range and smaller bombload relative to other heavy bombers was not so detrimental as it was in the Pacific, where most American airbases were thousands of miles apart.

Military operators

Brazil acquired 13 B-17s in 1951, according to the Rio Pact of 1947. They were used by the 1º and 2º Esquadrões (1st and 2nd Squadrons) of 6º Grupo de Aviação (6th Aviation Group), based at Recife, for search and rescue and photo-reconnaissance until 1968.Brazilian Air Force

  • 6º Grupo de Aviação
    • 1º Esquadrão
    • 2º Esquadrão

Canada received six Flying Fortresses (three B-17Es and three B-17Fs) which flew 240 trans-Atlantic mail flights from Canada to Canadian troops serving in Europe from 6 December 1943 to 27 December 1946. All six belonged to no. 168 Heavy Transport Squadron which operated out of RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario.Royal Canadian Air Force

Danish airline DDL bought two B-17s from Sweden in 1945. One of these planes was transferred to the Danish Army Air Corps in 1948. In 1949, it was transferred to the Royal Danish Navy and in 1952 to the Royal Danish Air Force.

Dominican Republic Air Force acquired two B-17Gs in 1947.

French Air Force used one B-17F as an executive transport for Free-French General M. P. Koening.

During World War II, after crash-landing or being forced down, approximately 40 B-17s were repaired and put back into the air by the Luftwaffe. These captured aircraft were codenamed "Dornier Do 200", given German markings and used for clandestine spy and reconnaissance missions by the Luftwaffe - most often used by the Luftwaffe unit known as KG 200, hence a likely possibility as a source for the "Do 200" codename.Luftwaffe

When Israel achieved statehood in 1948, the Israeli Air Force had to be assembled quickly to defend the new nation from the war it found itself almost immediately embroiled in. Among the first aircraft acquired by the Israeli Air Force were three surplus American B-17s, smuggled via South America and Czechoslovakia to avoid an arms trading ban imposed by the United States. A fourth plane was abandoned due to malfunctions and confiscated by American officials. On their delivery flight from Europe, in retaliation for Egyptian bombing raids on Tel-Aviv, the aircraft were ordered to bomb King Farouk's Royal Palace in Cairo before continuing to Israel. They performed the mission (despite some of the crew fainting due to defective oxygen equipment), but caused little damage. The B-17s were generally unsuitable for the needs of the Israeli Air Force, and the nature of the conflict in which long-range bombing raids on large area targets were relatively unimportant—although the psychological impact of the raids was not lost on the enemy. The aircraft were mainly used in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, flown by 69 Squadron; they were withdrawn in 1958 after seeing minor action in the 1956 Suez Crisis.Israeli Air Force

At least three early versions B-17s (2 B-17Ds and early B-17E) were captured by the Japanese in the Philippines and Netherlands East Indies. Planes were tested by the IJAAF Koku Gijutsu Kenkyujo (Air Technical Research Laboratory) at Tachikawa.

The B-17s were used during the occupation of Nicaragua against the Sandinista National Liberation Front(Frente Sandinista de Liberacion Nacional)]]

Força Aérea Portuguesa (Portuguese Air Force) operated five SB-17Gs as search-and-rescue planes from 1947 to 1960.

Late in World War II, RAF and USAAF bombers that had been damaged in raids over the Reich would put down in Soviet-controlled territory rather than try to make it back to Western bases, and in April 1945 the Soviet Air Force issued a directive to its units in the field to report the location of any aircraft of its Western Allies that were in Soviet hands; among the aircraft salvaged were a total of 73 B-17s. The Fortresses that were in the best condition were returned to the USAAF, but a number were retained as interim heavy bombers. Although Russian aircrews and maintenance crews had no experience with such aircraft, the Soviets proved ingenious at keeping them flying, and in fact were delighted with the B-17's handling, comparing it to a "swallow" and the nimble Po-2 biplane trainer. On the other hand, Soviet officials tended to order the "filthy pictures" applied to the aircraft removed or painted out. The B-17s remained in service until 1948, when the Tupolev Tu-4 began to arrive at operational squadrons.

Royal Air Force received 20 B-17Cs, redesignated Fortress I, in early 1940 from USAAC. By September, after the RAF had lost eight B-17Cs in combat or to accidents, Bomber Command had abandoned daylight bombing and RAF transferred its remaining Fortress I aircraft to Coastal Command for use as very long range patrol aircraft. These were later augmented in August 1942 by 19 Fortress Mk II and 45 Fortress Mk IIA (B-17F and B-17E, respectively).. From 1944 the Fortress IIs and IIIs were being used by the specialist electronic coutnermeasures squadrons of No. 100 Group RAFRoyal Air Force

United States Army Air Corps / United States Army Air Forces USAAC / USAAF was main operator of all versions of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress. Most units operating B-17 were based in the European Theatre of World War II but aircraft was used at some point in all theatres of World War II.First Air Force, Second Air Force, Third Air Force, Fourth Air Force 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Air Force stationed in the continental United States.;1st Photo Group;1st Search Attack Group;2d Bombardment Group, Heavy;39th Bombardment Group, Heavy;88th Bombardment Group, Heavy;304th Bombardment Group, Heavy;331st Bombardment Group, Heavy;333d Bombardment Group, Heavy;346th Bombardment Group, Heavy;383d Bombardment Group, Heavy;393d Bombardment Group, Heavy;395th Bombardment Group, Heavy;396th Bombardment Group, Heavy;444th Bombardment Group, Heavy;469th Bombardment Group, Heavy;488th Bombardment Group, Heavy;504th Bombardment Group, Heavy;505th Bombardment Group, HeavyFifth Air Force Fifth Air Force stationed in the Pacific Theater of Operations.;19th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*28th Bomb Squadron
*30th Bomb Squadron
*93d Bomb Squadron ;43d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*63d Bomb Squadron
*64th Bomb Squadron
*65th Bomb Squadron
*403d Bomb SquadronSixth Air Force
Sixth Air Force stationed in the Panama Canal zone.;6th Bombardment Group, Heavy;9th Bombardment Group, Heavy;40th Bombardment Group, HeavySeventh Air Force Seventh Air Force stationed in the Pacific Theater of Operations.;5th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*31st Bomb Squadron
*23d Bomb Squadron
*72d Bomb Squadron
*394th Bomb Squadron;11th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*26th Bomb Squadron
*42d Bomb Squadron
*98th Bomb Squadron
*431st Bomb SquadronEighth Air Force
Eighth Air Force stationed in England.;34th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*4th Bomb Squadron
*7th Bomb Squadron
*18th Bomb Squadron
*391st Bomb Squadron;91st Bombardment Group, Heavy
*322d Bomb Squadron
*323d Bomb Squadron
*324th Bomb Squadron
*401st Bomb Squadron;92d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*325th Bomb Squadron
*326th Bomb Squadron
*327th Bomb Squadron
*407th Bomb Squadron;94th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*331st Bomb Squadron
*332d Bomb Squadron
*333d Bomb Squadron
*410th Bomb Squadron;95th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*334th Bomb Squadron
*335th Bomb Squadron
*336th Bomb Squadron
*412th Bomb Squadron;96th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*337th Bomb Squadron
*338th Bomb Squadron
*339th Bomb Squadron
*413th Bomb Squadron;100th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*349th Bomb Squadron
*350th Bomb Squadron
*351st Bomb Squadron
*418th Bomb Squadron;303d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*358th Bomb Squadron
*359th Bomb Squadron
*360th Bomb Squadron
*427th Bomb Squadron;305th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*364th Bomb Squadron
*365th Bomb Squadron
*366th Bomb Squadron
*422d Bomb Squadron;306th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*367th Bomb Squadron
*368th Bomb Squadron
*369th Bomb Squadron
*423d Bomb Squadron;351st Bombardment Group, Heavy
*508th Bomb Squadron
*509th Bomb Squadron
*510th Bomb Squadron
*511th Bomb Squadron;379th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*524th Bomb Squadron
*525th Bomb Squadron
*526th Bomb Squadron
*527th Bomb Squadron;381st Bombardment Group, Heavy
*532d Bomb Squadron
*533d Bomb Squadron
*534th Bomb Squadron
*535th Bomb Squadron;384th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*544th Bomb Squadron
*545th Bomb Squadron
*546th Bomb Squadron
*547th Bomb Squadron;385th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*548th Bomb Squadron
*549th Bomb Squadron
*550th Bomb Squadron
*551st Bomb Squadron;388th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*560th Bomb Squadron
*561st Bomb Squadron
*562d Bomb Squadron
*563d Bomb Squadron;390th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*568th Bomb Squadron
*569th Bomb Squadron
*570th Bomb Squadron
*571st Bomb Squadron;398th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*600th Bomb Squadron
*601st Bomb Squadron
*602d Bomb Squadron
*603d Bomb Squadron;401st Bombardment Group, Heavy
*612th Bomb Squadron
*613th Bomb Squadron
*614th Bomb Squadron
*615th Bomb Squadron;447th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*708th Bomb Squadron
*709th Bomb Squadron
*710th Bomb Squadron
*711th Bomb Squadron;452d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*728th Bomb Squadron
*729th Bomb Squadron
*730th Bomb Squadron
*731st Bomb Squadron;457th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*748th Bomb Squadron
*749th Bomb Squadron
*750th Bomb Squadron
*751st Bomb Squadron;482d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*812th Bomb Squadron
*813th Bomb Squadron
*814th Bomb Squadron;486th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*832d Bomb Squadron
*833d Bomb Squadron
*834th Bomb Squadron
*835th Bomb Squadron;487th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*836th Bomb Squadron
*837th Bomb Squadron
*838th Bomb Squadron
*839th Bomb Squadron;490th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*848th Bomb Squadron
*849th Bomb Squadron
*850th Bomb Squadron
*851st Bomb Squadron;493d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*860th Bomb Squadron
*861st Bomb Squadron
*862d Bomb Squadron
*863d Bomb SquadronTenth Air Force
Tenth Air Force stationed in South-East Asian Theatre of World War II (Indochina).;7th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*9th Bomb Squadron
*436th Bomb Squadron
*492d Bomb Squadron
*493d Bomb SquadronFifteenth Air Force
Fifteenth Air Force stationed in the Italy.;2d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*20th Bomb Squadron
*49th Bomb Squadron
*96th Bomb Squadron
*429th Bomb Squadron ;97th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*340th Bomb Squadron
*314th Bomb Squadron
*342d Bomb Squadron
*414th Bomb Squadron;99th Bombardment Group, Heavy
*346th Bomb Squadron
*347th Bomb Squadron
*348th Bomb Squadron
*416th Bomb Squadron ;301st Bombardment Group, Heavy
*32nd Bomb Squadron
*352nd Bomb Squadron
*353rd Bomb Squadron
*419th Bomb Squadron ;463d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*772d Bomb Squadron
*773d Bomb Squadron
*774th Bomb Squadron
*775th Bomb Squadron;483d Bombardment Group, Heavy
*815th Bomb Squadron
*816th Bomb Squadron
*817th Bomb Squadron
*840th Bomb Squadron

Civil operators

Used 25 B-17s in civil aviation under different operators.

Danish airline DDL bought two B-17s from Sweden in 1945. One of these planes was transferred to the Danish Army Air Corps in 1948.

14 B-17 were used between 1946 and 1975 by the french IGN (Institut Géographique National) for aerial photography. One of them is still flying today after restoration as Pink Lady.

One of Trans World Airlines B-17G was given to the Shah of Iran in 1947.

In an exchange with about 300 interned American crew members, nine intact B-17 were given away for free to the Swedish airline SILA (Svensk Interkontinental Lufttrafik AB) to be operated by ABA (which later became part of Scandinavian Airlines System). Seven of these, three B-17F and four B-17G, were converted into 14-seat airliners by Saab Aircraft. By 1946 all were retired and replaced by DC-4. Today, one of them is on static display at National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, restored back to combat figuration.

  • Following the war, Trans World Airlines purchased a surplus B-17G and used it to survey and set up routes in the Middle-East. In 1947, it was given to the Shah of Iran.
  • Aero Union - began operation of the B-17 as a fire fighting aircraft in 1961.

References

Related content

Search another word or see trading banon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature