Definitions

Tony

Tony

[toh-nee]
Pastor, Tony, c.1837-1908, American theater manager, b. New York City. Pastor appeared on the stage from childhood and became an experienced acrobat, dancer, and singer. He opened his first theater at 444 Broadway, New York City, in 1861. Thereafter he opened two more Broadway theaters, and in 1881 began presenting shows at his best-known playhouse on 14th St. In these establishments Pastor introduced many performers who became famous (notably Lillian Russell) and presented vaudeville suitable for a mixed audience.

See biography by P. Zellers (1971).

Garnier, Tony, 1869-1948, French architect. His greatest achievement was in urban planning. After his study of sociological and architectural problems of an industrial city, he began in 1901 to formulate an elaborate solution, published as Une cité industrielle (1918). His proposals served as a stimulus to young architects of the 1920s. From 1905 to 1919 Garnier was architect to the city of Lyons. In this capacity he built the municipal slaughterhouse, a hospital, and a stadium, which are of interest for their use of reinforced concrete.
Blair, Tony (Anthony Charles Lynton Blair), 1953-, British politician, b. Edinburgh. An Oxford-educated lawyer, he was first elected to Parliament in 1983 as the Labour party candidate from a district in N England. Articulate and telegenic, Blair rose quickly in the party organization. He was chosen as Labour's leader after the death (1994) of John Smith, even though he, unlike previous leaders, had no roots in the labor movement and rejected socialist doctrine. (His principal opponent for the post, Gordon Brown, stepped aside in deal that led to Brown's becoming chancellor of the exchequer in 1997.) As leader, he endeavored to reposition the party as a moderate center-left alternative to the Conservatives.

In 1997, when Blair led Labour to power for the first time since 1979, he became the youngest prime minister since William Pitt the younger (1783). He moved quickly to implement a "third way" program, reducing Labour's traditional reliance on state action to address social problems; to establish elected representative bodies in Scotland and Wales; to negotiate peace in Northern Ireland; and to cooperate politically with the third-party Liberal Democrats. Internationally, Blair worked improve ties with other European Union nations while moving slowly, due in part to public and political resistance, on monetary union and adoption of the euro; in his first term, he also was an outspoken proponent of the use of NATO forces in the Kosovo crisis. Blair's critics, however, charged that he was more style than substance. Despite a lack of enthusiasm for Blair's leadership style, which many regarded as arrogant, voters again gave him and Labour a resounding victory at the polls in 2001, making him the first Labour prime minister to win to consecutive terms in office.

Following the Sept., 2001, attacks by terrorists in the United States, Blair gave America highly visible support, including the use of British military forces, in its retaliation against Afghanistan and Osama bin Laden. He also strongly supported the Bush administration in its insistence that Iraq readmit UN weapons inspectors and disarm or face military action and, despite opposition from the British public and in the Labour party to war with Iraq, he committed British troops to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. After the invasion, when biological and chemical weapons were not readily found in Iraq, he and his government were criticized for having exaggerated the threat that Iraq represented.

Iraq hurt Blair and Labour politically and led to a diminished margin of victory in the 2005 parliamentary elections, but Blair nonetheless secured a record third consecutive term for a Labour government. Under pressure from many in his party, Blair announced (2006) that he would resign as party leader and prime minister, and he did so in June, 2007. His terms as prime minister were marked by sustained economic growth, in part due to the policies of Gordon Brown, and by steady, if sometimes fitful, progress toward peace in Northern Ireland, but in other areas, such as education and health, improvements were minor at best, and the reform of the House of Lords was largely incomplete. Brown succeeded Blair as party leader and prime minister, and Blair subsequently resigned from Parliament. After Blair stepped down he was named special envoy by the quartet (the European Union, Russia, the United States, and the United Nations) seeking to negotiate a peace accord between Israel and the Palestinians, the focus of his post being the strengthening of Palestinian institutions. A convert (2007) to Roman Catholicism, he established (2008) a foundation to promote interfaith understanding.

See biography by P. Stephens (2004); C. Coughlin, American Ally: Tony Blair and the War on Terror (2005).

Smith, Tony, 1912-80, American sculptor, b. South Orange, N.J., studied Art Students League, New York City (1933-37), New Bauhaus, Chicago (1937-38). Trained as a painter and architect and for a time associated with Frank Lloyd Wright, Smith had his own architectural firm during the 1940s. He turned to sculpture in the 1950s, applying architectural principles to his monumental black steel constructions. Allied with minimalism, he worked with simple geometrical modules combined on a three-dimensional grid, creating drama through simplicity and scale. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, N.Y.C., National Gallery, Washington, D.C., and other leading museums. The artist Kiki Smith is his daughter.

See studies by L. R. Lippard (1972), K. Kertess and J. Rachner (1996), R. Storr, ed. (1998), and R. Tuttle (2002).

Dorsett, Tony (Anthony Drew Dorsett), 1954-, American football player, b. Rochester, Pa. The first running back to gain over 6,000 yards in Division I-A, he won the Heisman Trophy as the best college player of 1976 while leading the Univ. of Pittsburgh to a national championship. Dorsett then gained 12,739 yards (fourth-best all-time) in 12 professional seasons with the Dallas Cowboys.
Kushner, Tony, 1956-, American playwright, b. New York City. Educated at Columbia and New York Univ., he was a little-known off-Broadway playwright with several interesting works, e.g., Yes, Yes, No, No (1985) and A Bright Room Called Day (1987), to his credit when his Angels in America (1991-92) burst on the theatrical scene. This two-part, seven-hour, Pulitzer Prize- and Tony-winning drama of life in the age of AIDS mingles the political, personal, and universal in its treatment of such apparently disparate elements as gay and straight relationships, the Mormon faith, Roy Cohn, Ethel Rosenberg (see Rosenberg Case), disease, love, and death. The play was adapted into an Emmy-winning television drama (2002), directed by Mike Nichols. Hailed as a major talent, Kushner has been praised for his intelligence, wit, and humanity. Since Angels he has written Slavs! (1994), an ironic political fantasia; Homebody/Kabul (2001), a linguistically rich drama centered about an imaginary and a real Afghanistan; and Caroline, or Change (2004), a semiautobiographical musical that focuses on issues of race and class.

Inspired by a 1942 Czech opera performed by children at the Theresienstadt concentration camp, Kushner supplied the text for the children's book Brundibar and the libretto for the opera (both: 2003) based on it; Maurice Sendak illustrated the book and designed the opera production. The two also collaborated on a version of Martinů's 1937 opera Comedy on the Bridge. Kushner has also made contemporary translations of two plays by Bertolt Brecht, Good Person of Setzuan (1994) and Mother Courage and Her Children (2006).

See R. Vorlicky, ed., Tony Kushner in Conversation (1998); studies by P. Brask, ed. (1995), D. R. Geis and S. F. Kruger, ed. (1997), J. Fisher (2001), and H. Bloom, ed. (2005).

orig. Antonio Pastor

Tony Pastor

(born May 28, 1837, New York, N.Y., U.S.—died Aug. 26, 1908, Elmhurst, N.Y.) U.S. impresario and comic singer. He appeared at P.T. Barnum's American Museum as a child prodigy and first performed in a variety show in 1861. After managing a series of New York City theatres, he opened the Fourteenth Street Theatre in 1881. Though variety shows of the time featured coarse humour and were considered unsuitable for ladies, he advertised his theatre as “the first specialty and vaudeville theatre of America, catering to polite tastes.” His unexpected success spurred other theatre managers to follow suit and led to the creation of vaudeville. Seealso music hall and variety theatre.

Learn more about Pastor, Tony with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Aug. 13, 1869, Lyon, Fr.—died Jan. 19, 1948, Roquefort-la Bédoule) French architect. The son of Charles Garnier (see Paris Opéra), he held the position of architect of Lyon from 1905 to 1919. He is known chiefly for his Cité Industrielle, a farsighted plan for an industrial city. Most striking is his depiction of simplified reinforced-concrete forms inspired by the pioneering work of Auguste Perret. The most important work in Lyon to emerge from his Cité Industrielle plan was the large stockyard complex of 1908–24.

Learn more about Garnier, Tony with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Anthony Charles Lynton

(born May 6, 1953, Edinburgh, Scot.) British politician and prime minister (1997–2007). He was the United Kingdom's youngest prime minister since 1812 and the longest-serving Labour Party prime minister. Blair was a lawyer before winning election to the House of Commons in 1983. Entering the shadow cabinet of the Labour Party in 1988 at age 35, Blair urged the party to move to the political centre and deemphasize its traditional advocacy of state control and public ownership of certain sectors of the economy. He assumed leadership of Labour in 1994 and revamped its platform. He led the party to victories in the 1997, 2001, and 2005 elections. His government brokered a peace agreement between unionists and republicans in Northern Ireland, introduced devolved assemblies in Wales and Scotland, and carried out reforms of Parliament. After the September 11 attacks on the U.S. in 2001, Blair allied the United Kingdom with the U.S. and its president, George W. Bush, in a global war against terrorism. In late 2002 Blair and Bush accused the Iraqi government of Ssubdotaddām Hsubdotussein of continuing to possess and develop biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons in violation of UN mandates. Despite deep divisions within his own party and strong public opposition to a war with Iraq, Blair, with Bush, led an attack on Iraq that toppled Hsubdotussein's regime in March–April 2003. Blair's continued support of the Iraq War led to a decline in his popularity. Nearly a year after announcing that he was stepping down as prime minister, Blair left office on June 27, 2007; he was succeeded by Gordon Brown. Blair subsequently was selected by the “quartet” (the U.S., the European Union, Russia, and the UN) to serve as special envoy to the Middle East.

Learn more about Blair, Tony with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Antonio Pastor

Tony Pastor

(born May 28, 1837, New York, N.Y., U.S.—died Aug. 26, 1908, Elmhurst, N.Y.) U.S. impresario and comic singer. He appeared at P.T. Barnum's American Museum as a child prodigy and first performed in a variety show in 1861. After managing a series of New York City theatres, he opened the Fourteenth Street Theatre in 1881. Though variety shows of the time featured coarse humour and were considered unsuitable for ladies, he advertised his theatre as “the first specialty and vaudeville theatre of America, catering to polite tastes.” His unexpected success spurred other theatre managers to follow suit and led to the creation of vaudeville. Seealso music hall and variety theatre.

Learn more about Pastor, Tony with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Aug. 13, 1869, Lyon, Fr.—died Jan. 19, 1948, Roquefort-la Bédoule) French architect. The son of Charles Garnier (see Paris Opéra), he held the position of architect of Lyon from 1905 to 1919. He is known chiefly for his Cité Industrielle, a farsighted plan for an industrial city. Most striking is his depiction of simplified reinforced-concrete forms inspired by the pioneering work of Auguste Perret. The most important work in Lyon to emerge from his Cité Industrielle plan was the large stockyard complex of 1908–24.

Learn more about Garnier, Tony with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Anthony Charles Lynton

(born May 6, 1953, Edinburgh, Scot.) British politician and prime minister (1997–2007). He was the United Kingdom's youngest prime minister since 1812 and the longest-serving Labour Party prime minister. Blair was a lawyer before winning election to the House of Commons in 1983. Entering the shadow cabinet of the Labour Party in 1988 at age 35, Blair urged the party to move to the political centre and deemphasize its traditional advocacy of state control and public ownership of certain sectors of the economy. He assumed leadership of Labour in 1994 and revamped its platform. He led the party to victories in the 1997, 2001, and 2005 elections. His government brokered a peace agreement between unionists and republicans in Northern Ireland, introduced devolved assemblies in Wales and Scotland, and carried out reforms of Parliament. After the September 11 attacks on the U.S. in 2001, Blair allied the United Kingdom with the U.S. and its president, George W. Bush, in a global war against terrorism. In late 2002 Blair and Bush accused the Iraqi government of Ssubdotaddām Hsubdotussein of continuing to possess and develop biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons in violation of UN mandates. Despite deep divisions within his own party and strong public opposition to a war with Iraq, Blair, with Bush, led an attack on Iraq that toppled Hsubdotussein's regime in March–April 2003. Blair's continued support of the Iraq War led to a decline in his popularity. Nearly a year after announcing that he was stepping down as prime minister, Blair left office on June 27, 2007; he was succeeded by Gordon Brown. Blair subsequently was selected by the “quartet” (the U.S., the European Union, Russia, and the UN) to serve as special envoy to the Middle East.

Learn more about Blair, Tony with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Tony is a village in Rusk County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 105 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Tony is located at (45.481083, -90.994763).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.3 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 105 people, 43 households, and 27 families residing in the village. The population density was 51.7 people per square mile (20.0/km²). There were 45 housing units at an average density of 22.2/sq mi (8.6/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 99.05% White, 0.95% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.95% of the population.

There were 43 households out of which 25.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.9% were non-families. 32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 23.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the village the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 78.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.0 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $21,563, and the median income for a family was $31,250. Males had a median income of $26,875 versus $21,250 for females. The per capita income for the village was $16,328. There were 16.7% of families and 17.4% of the population living below the poverty line, including 50.0% of under eighteens and 11.8% of those over 64.

Notable people

  • Current Baltimore Ravens and former Wisconsin Badgers defensive back Jim Leonhard lived here.

References

External links

Search another word or see tonyon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;