Thor

Thor

[thawr]
Heyerdahl, Thor, 1914-2002, Norwegian explorer and anthropologist, b. Larvik. He carried out research in the Marquesas Islands in 1937-38 and studied the indigenous peoples of British Columbia in 1939-40. To support his thesis that the first settlers of Polynesia were of South American origin, in 1947 he and five companions made the crossing from Peru to the Tuamotu Archipelago on a primitive log raft. This voyage is described in the international bestseller Kon Tiki (tr. 1950). In 1970, Heyerdahl sailed, in a papyrus boat, from Morocco to Barbados, in an attempt to prove that ancient Mediterranean civilizations could have sailed in reed boats to America. This adventure is described in The Ra Expeditions (tr. 1971). In 1977, he sailed from the Persian Gulf to the Red Sea, following a route he believed was once used by the Sumerians; this trip is detailed in The Tigris Expedition (1979). Heyerdahl was an exponent of the diffusionist school of cultural anthropology, now largely discounted, and today most academics regard his theories as speculative and unproven. His other writings include American Indians in the Pacific (1952), Aku-Aku (tr. 1958), Sea Routes to Polynesia (1968), and Easter Island: The Mystery Solved (1989).

See biography by A. Jacoby (1967).

Thor, Germanic Donar, Norse god of thunder. An ancient and highly revered divinity, Thor was the patron and protector of peasants and warriors. As a god of might and war he was represented as extremely powerful and fearless, occasionally slow-witted, armed with a magical hammer (which returned to him when he threw it), iron gloves, and a belt of strength. Being a god of the people he was also associated with marriage, with the hearth, and with agriculture. According to one legend he was the son of Woden. Thor was identified with the Roman god Jupiter, and among Germanic peoples Jove's day became Thor's day (Thursday).

Thor Heyerdahl.

(born Oct. 6, 1914, Larvik, Nor.—died April 18, 2002, Colla Michari, Italy) Norwegian ethnologist and adventurer. After a trip to Polynesia convinced him that Polynesian culture bore traces of South American cultures, he built a raft, the Kon-Tiki, and sailed it from South America to Polynesia in 1947 to demonstrate the possibility of such contact, a trip recounted in his best-selling Kon-Tiki (1950). In 1969 he sailed a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian reed boat (the Ra) from Morocco to the Caribbean to show that the Egyptians could have had contact with the early peoples of Central and South America. In 1977 he took the reed craft Tigris from the Tigris River in Iraq across the Arabian Sea to Pakistan and back to the Red Sea to demonstrate the possibility of two-way trading journeys that could have spread ancient Sumerian culture eastward. Although he inspired many with his daring expeditions, his theories have not been generally accepted by anthropologists and his methods have been questioned.

Learn more about Heyerdahl, Thor with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Thor with his hammer, Mjollnir, on his knees, bronze statuette from northern Iceland, c. AD 1000; elipsis

Deity, common to all the early Germanic peoples, who appeared as a great, red-bearded warrior of tremendous strength. The son of Odin (according to some legends) and Jord, the earth goddess, he was the implacable foe of the harmful race of giants but was benevolent toward humans. His name is the Germanic word for thunder. His great weapon was his hammer, Mjollnir. His greatest enemy was the world serpent Jörmungand, which he was destined to kill, and be killed by, in the Ragnarök. Thursday is named for Thor.

Learn more about Thor with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Thor Heyerdahl.

(born Oct. 6, 1914, Larvik, Nor.—died April 18, 2002, Colla Michari, Italy) Norwegian ethnologist and adventurer. After a trip to Polynesia convinced him that Polynesian culture bore traces of South American cultures, he built a raft, the Kon-Tiki, and sailed it from South America to Polynesia in 1947 to demonstrate the possibility of such contact, a trip recounted in his best-selling Kon-Tiki (1950). In 1969 he sailed a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian reed boat (the Ra) from Morocco to the Caribbean to show that the Egyptians could have had contact with the early peoples of Central and South America. In 1977 he took the reed craft Tigris from the Tigris River in Iraq across the Arabian Sea to Pakistan and back to the Red Sea to demonstrate the possibility of two-way trading journeys that could have spread ancient Sumerian culture eastward. Although he inspired many with his daring expeditions, his theories have not been generally accepted by anthropologists and his methods have been questioned.

Learn more about Heyerdahl, Thor with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Thor is a city in Humboldt County, Iowa, United States. The population was 174 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Thor is located at (42.688687, -94.048902).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.0 square miles (2.6 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 174 people, 82 households, and 45 families residing in the city. The population density was 174.6 people per square mile (67.2/km²). There were 88 housing units at an average density of 88.3/sq mi (34.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 100.00% White.

There were 82 households out of which 23.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.1% were married couples living together, 3.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.1% were non-families. 36.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.76.

In the city the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 28.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,000, and the median income for a family was $37,500. Males had a median income of $29,375 versus $23,000 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,410. About 9.5% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under the age of eighteen and 24.1% of those sixty five or over.

Notable natives

References

External links

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