theodore de vinne

Theodore Low De Vinne

[duh vin-ee]
Theodore Low De Vinne (December 25, 1828-February 16, 1914) was an American printer and scholarly author on typography.

De Vinne was born at Stamford, Connecticut, and educated in the common schools of the various towns where his father had pastorates. He developed the ability to be a printer while employed in a shop at Fishkill, New York. He worked at the Newburgh, New York Gazette, then moved to New York City. In 1849 he entered the establishment of Francis Hart, and worked there until 1883 when the business was renamed Theodore L. Devinne & Co. In 1886 he moved to a model plant designed by him on Lafayette Place.

De Vinne did much for the improvement of American printing. For years his publications ranked at the head of American presswork. He was the most prolific of writers on printing, publishing:

  • The Invention of Printing (1876)
  • Historic Printing Types (1886)
  • Plain Types (1890)
  • The Practice of Typography (1900)
  • Correct Composition (1901)
  • Title-Pages (1902)
  • Modern Methods of Book Composition (1904)
  • Notable Printers of Italy during the Fifteenth Century (1910)

He was one of nine men who founded the Grolier Club.

References

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