Theobald

Theobald

[thee-uh-bawld]
Mathew, Theobald, 1790-1856, Irish social worker and temperance leader, a Capuchin priest. Father Mathew spent many years working for the welfare and education of the poor. In 1838 he took a pledge of total abstinence and thereafter devoted himself to the cause of temperance, campaigning in Ireland, England, and North America.
Theobald, Lewis, 1688-1744, English author. He is chiefly remembered for his Shakespeare Restored (1726), in which he exposed the inaccuracies of Pope's edition of Shakespeare. Pope retaliated by satirizing him in the 1728 edition of The Dunciad. Theobald also wrote poems and plays.
Smith, Theobald, 1859-1934, American pathologist, b. Albany, N.Y., M.D. Albany Medical College, 1883. He was professor of bacteriology at Columbian (now George Washington) Univ. (1886-95) and of comparative pathology at Harvard (1896-1915) and served (1915-29) as director of the department of animal pathology at Rockefeller Institute (now Rockefeller Univ.). He demonstrated the etiology of Texas cattle fever, differentiated between human and bovine tubercle bacilli, and, in his work on immunity, noted the allergylike reaction later investigated by Richet.

(born Jan. 20, 1763, Dublin, Ire.—died Nov. 19, 1798, Dublin) Irish republican and rebel. In 1791 he cofounded the Society of United Irishmen to work for parliamentary reform. He organized a Catholic convention of elected delegates that forced Parliament to pass the Catholic Relief Act in 1793. In 1796, seeking to overthrow English rule in Ireland, he convinced France to send an invasion force of 43 ships and 14,000 men, but the ships were dispersed by a storm. Tone again brought an Irish invasion plan to Paris in October 1797, but the principal French military leader, Napoleon Bonaparte, took little interest. In 1798, with only 3,000 men, he again attempted an invasion; captured and sentenced to hang, he committed suicide.

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(born July 31, 1859, Albany, N.Y., U.S.—died Dec. 10, 1934, New York, N.Y., U.S.) U.S. microbiologist and pathologist. He received his M.D. from Cornell University. He discovered that injected heat-killed cultures of the causative microorganisms can immunize animals against disease. His discovery that Texas cattle fever is caused by a parasite transmitted by ticks—the first definite proof of arthropods' role in spreading disease—helped the scientific community accept mosquitoes' role in malaria and yellow fever. Smith was the first to differentiate the bacteria that cause tuberculosis in cattle and in humans, and he was one of the first to notice anaphylaxis. He also improved laboratory production of vaccines.

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(born July 31, 1859, Albany, N.Y., U.S.—died Dec. 10, 1934, New York, N.Y., U.S.) U.S. microbiologist and pathologist. He received his M.D. from Cornell University. He discovered that injected heat-killed cultures of the causative microorganisms can immunize animals against disease. His discovery that Texas cattle fever is caused by a parasite transmitted by ticks—the first definite proof of arthropods' role in spreading disease—helped the scientific community accept mosquitoes' role in malaria and yellow fever. Smith was the first to differentiate the bacteria that cause tuberculosis in cattle and in humans, and he was one of the first to notice anaphylaxis. He also improved laboratory production of vaccines.

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Theobald, Count of Champagne may refer to:

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