Tallulah

Tallulah

[tuh-loo-luh]
Bankhead, Tallulah, 1903-68, American actress, b. Huntsville, Ala.; daughter of William Brockman Bankhead. After her debut in 1918, Bankhead had great success on the London stage, where she appeared (1923-30) in 16 plays. She was particularly acclaimed for her performance on Broadway as Regina in The Little Foxes (1939) and, in film, as a shipwrecked journalist in Lifeboat (1944). In the latter, she brought to the role the wit, sophisticated aplomb, and uninhibited behavior that made her a legend.

See her autobiography (1952); memoir by E. Rawls (1979); biographies by B. Gill (1972), L. Israel (1972), K. Tunney (1973), and J. Lobenthal (2004).

(born Jan. 31, 1902, Huntsville, Ala., U.S.—died Dec. 12, 1968, New York, N.Y.) U.S. film and stage actress. Born to a prestigious family (her father became a prominent congressman), she made her Broadway debut in 1918 and achieved fame on the London stage in The Dancer (1923). Her vivid presence and throaty voice contributed to her singular performances in the hit plays The Little Foxes (1939), The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), and Private Lives (1946). She made films such as A Woman's Law (1928) and Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944) but remained primarily a stage performer. Her final stage appearance was in The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore (1964).

Learn more about Bankhead, Tallulah (Brockman) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 31, 1902, Huntsville, Ala., U.S.—died Dec. 12, 1968, New York, N.Y.) U.S. film and stage actress. Born to a prestigious family (her father became a prominent congressman), she made her Broadway debut in 1918 and achieved fame on the London stage in The Dancer (1923). Her vivid presence and throaty voice contributed to her singular performances in the hit plays The Little Foxes (1939), The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), and Private Lives (1946). She made films such as A Woman's Law (1928) and Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944) but remained primarily a stage performer. Her final stage appearance was in The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore (1964).

Learn more about Bankhead, Tallulah (Brockman) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Tallulah is a city in and the parish seat of Madison Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 9,189 at the 2000 census. Tallulah is the principal city of the Tallulah Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Madison Parish.

Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections operates the Steve Hoyle Rehabilitation Center in Tallulah.

Geography

Tallulah is located at (32.409047, -91.191306).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km²), all of it land.

Tallulah got its name in an unusual sort of way. When the railroad was expanding in the area, there was a widow that owned a large plantation. She became friendly with the railroad's contractor and persuaded him to change the route of the railroad so it would run through her plantation. After the railroad was built she had nothing else to do with him. Feeling rejected he named the water stop for an old girlfriend named Tallulah, instead of the plantation.

Tallulah was the first city in the United States to have an indoor shopping mall. The mall was only one hall with stores on either side much like the ones today but much smaller. This hall opened into the street on both ends. This historic land mark is still in Tallulah to this day on US HWY 80, though no longer in use.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 9,189 people, 3,016 households, and 2,078 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,396.0 people per square mile (1,309.2/km²). There were 3,226 housing units at an average density of 1,192.2/sq mi (459.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 23.22% White, 74.79% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 1.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.12% of the population.

There were 3,016 households out of which 36.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.4% were married couples living together, 30.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.49.

In the city the population was spread out with 37.6% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 23.3% from 25 to 44, 17.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 26 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $17,142, and the median income for a family was $20,100. Males had a median income of $22,346 versus $14,679 for females. The per capita income for the city was $8,324. About 35.7% of families and 43.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 59.2% of those under age 18 and 25.2% of those age 65 or over.

References

Search another word or see tallulahon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature