Sylvia

Sylvia

[sil-vee-uh]
Ashton-Warner, Sylvia, 1905-84, New Zealand British novelist and educator, b. Stratford, New Zealand. For years a teacher of Maori children, Ashton-Warner developed many stimulating educational methods about which she wrote in the treatise Teacher (1963) and in successive volumes of her autobiography (1967, 1972, 1979). Her success as a teacher and as a writer stemmed from her conviction that communication must produce a mutual response if it is to bring about lasting change. Spearpoint: Teacher in America (1972) recounted her experiences teaching in an experimental school in the United States. Ashton-Warner's novels were written in an exotic, rather florid style and for the most part concern strong, passionate women. They include Spinster (1958), Incense to Idols (1960), Bell Call (1964), Greenstone (1967), and Three (1970).

See study by L. Hood (1989).

Plath, Sylvia, 1932-63, American poet, b. Boston. Educated at Smith College and Cambridge, Plath published poems even as a child and won many academic and literary awards. Her first volume of poetry, The Colossus (1960), is at once highly disciplined, well crafted, and intensely personal; these qualities are present in all her work. Ariel (1968), considered her finest book of poetry, was written in the last months of her life and published posthumously, as were Crossing the Water (1971) and Winter Trees (1972). Her late poems reveal an objective detachment from life and a growing fascination with death. They are rendered with impeccable and ruthless art, describing the most extreme reaches of Plath's consciousness and passions. Her one novel, The Bell Jar (1971), originally published in England under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas in 1962, is autobiographical, a fictionalized account of a nervous breakdown she suffered when in college. Plath was married to the poet Ted Hughes and was the mother of two children. She committed suicide in London in Feb., 1963. Ever since, her brief life, troubled marriage, and fiercely luminous poetry have provided the raw materials for interpretation by a small army of biographers, feminists, memoirists, novelists, playwrights, scholars, and others.

Bibliography

See her collected poems (1981); occasional prose, Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams (1979); journals, ed. by T. Hughes and F. McCullough (1983); The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 1950-1962 (2000), ed. by K. V. Kulil; biographies by E. Butscher (1979), A. Stevenson (1989), P. Alexander (1991), R. Hayman (1991), J. Rose (1991), and L. Wagner-Martin (rev. ed. 2003); J. Malcolm, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes (1994); T. Hughes, Birthday Letters (1998); D. Middlebrook, Her Husband: Hughes and Plath-A Marriage (2003); J. Becker, Giving Up: The Last Days of Sylvia Plath: A Memoir (2004); studies by M. Broe (1980), J. Rosenblatt (1982), and L. Wagner-Martin, ed. (1988, repr. 1997).

(born Oct. 27, 1932, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died Feb. 11, 1963, London, Eng.) U.S. poet. The daughter of an entomologist, Plath was driven to excel as a writer from an early age and published her first poem at age eight. At Smith College she made an early suicide attempt and submitted to electroshock treatment. While attending Cambridge University on a Fulbright grant, she married the poet Ted Hughes. After their separation, she committed suicide at age 30. Though she was not widely recognized in her lifetime, her reputation grew rapidly afterward; by the 1970s she was considered a major contemporary poet. Her works, often confessional and preoccupied with alienation, death, and self-destruction, include the volumes The Colossus (1960), Ariel (1965), and The Collected Poems (1981, Pulitzer Prize) and a semiautobiographical novel, The Bell Jar (1963).

Learn more about Plath, Sylvia with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Oct. 27, 1932, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died Feb. 11, 1963, London, Eng.) U.S. poet. The daughter of an entomologist, Plath was driven to excel as a writer from an early age and published her first poem at age eight. At Smith College she made an early suicide attempt and submitted to electroshock treatment. While attending Cambridge University on a Fulbright grant, she married the poet Ted Hughes. After their separation, she committed suicide at age 30. Though she was not widely recognized in her lifetime, her reputation grew rapidly afterward; by the 1970s she was considered a major contemporary poet. Her works, often confessional and preoccupied with alienation, death, and self-destruction, include the volumes The Colossus (1960), Ariel (1965), and The Collected Poems (1981, Pulitzer Prize) and a semiautobiographical novel, The Bell Jar (1963).

Learn more about Plath, Sylvia with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Sylvia is a city in Reno County, Kansas, United States. The population was 297 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Sylvia is located at (37.957673, -98.408878).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.8 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 297 people, 122 households, and 84 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,034.5 people per square mile (395.4/km²). There were 142 housing units at an average density of 494.6/sq mi (189.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.97% White, 0.34% Native American, 1.01% Asian, 0.67% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.68% of the population.

There were 122 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 29.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,167, and the median income for a family was $38,125. Males had a median income of $38,958 versus $17,813 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,322. About 4.4% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under the age of eighteen and 6.3% of those sixty five or over.

Notable natives

  • Alva Duer, basketball coach, member of the Basketball Hall of Fame

References

External links

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