Definitions

swap horses

List of political slogans

The following is a partial list of 19th and 20th-century political slogans in the English language.

U.S. presidential campaign slogans (listed alphabetically)

  • Acid, Amnesty, and Abortion - 1972 anti-Democratic Party slogan, from a statement by State of Missouri Senator Thomas F. Eagleton (a Democrat) to reporter Bob Novak during the Democratic primaries, about the platform of George McGovern.
  • A chicken in every pot. A car in every garage. — 1928 Republican presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover.
  • All the way with LBJ —1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon Johnson
  • A time for greatness 1960 U.S. presidential campaign theme of John F. Kennedy (Kennedy also used, "We Can Do Better").
  • Are You Better Off Than You Were Four Years Ago? — a 1980 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Ronald Reagan that referred to the economic recession during Carter's presidency.
  • Back to normalcy - 1920 U.S. presidential campaign theme of Warren G. Harding, reference to returning to normal times following World War I.
  • Better a Third Term Than a Third-Rater-1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt, which refers to Roosevelt's election for a third term as president
  • Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine. Continental Liar from the state of Maine - 1884 U.S. presidential campaign slogan used by the supporters of Grover Cleveland, Blaine's opponent
  • Bozo and the Pineapple —Uncomplimentary name given to the 1976 U.S. presidential campaign ticket of Gerald Ford and Bob Dole.
  • Change We Can Believe In - 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama.
  • Country First - 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John McCain.
  • Defeat the New Deal and Its Reckless Spending - 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • Don't swap horses in midstream — 1864 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Abraham Lincoln. Also used by George W. Bush, with detractors parodying it as "Don't change horsemen in mid-apocalypse." The slogan was also used for comic effect in the film Wag the Dog.
  • Four more years of the full dinner pail - 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley
  • Full Dinner Pail - William McKinley in 1900
  • Give 'Em Hell, Harry! - 1948 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Harry Truman
  • Go clean for Gene - 1968 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Eugene McCarthy
  • Grandfather's hat fits Ben - 1888 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Benjamin Harrison, whose grandfather William Henry Harrison was elected U.S. president in 1840.
  • Grant beat Davis - Greeley bailed him - 1872 anti-Horace Greeley and pro-Ulysses S. Grant slogan, which references Jefferson Davis
  • Grant us another term - 1872 Ulysses S. Grant presidential re-election campaign slogan
  • He kept us out of war - Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan, also "He proved the pen mightier than the sword"
  • Hoo but Hoover? - 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover.
  • I like Ike - 1952 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
  • I propose (to the American people) a New Deal - 1932 slogan by democratic presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • I still like Ike - 1956 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • I'm just wild about Harry - 1948 U.S. presidential slogan of Harry S. Truman, taken from a 1921 popular song title written by Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake.
  • In Your Heart, You Know He's Right — 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barry Goldwater
  • In Your Guts, You Know He's Nuts — An unofficial anti-Barry Goldwater slogan, parodying "In Your Heart, You know He's Right", 1964.
  • It's Time to Change America — a theme of the 1992 U.S. presidential campaign of Bill Clinton
  • It's The Economy, Stupid. - 1992 presidential campaign of Bill Clinton
  • Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge — The 1924 presidential campaign slogan of Calvin Coolidge.
  • Let Well Enough Alone - 1900 presidential campaign slogan of William McKinley.
  • Let's Get Another Deck - 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • Let's Make It a Landon-Slide - 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • Life, Liberty, and Landon -1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • Ma, Ma where's my Pa? — 1884 U.S. presidential slogan used by the James Blaine supporters against his opponent Grover Cleveland, the slogan referred to fact Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child in 1874. When Cleveland was elected President, his supporters added the line, "Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!"
  • Morning Again in America Ronald Reagan Slogan for 1984 Presidential election
  • No Fourth Term Either-1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • Peace and Prosperity — 1956 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • Pour it on 'em, Harry! - 1948 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Harry S. Truman
  • Remember Hoover! - 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • Roosevelt for Ex-President — 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell Willkie
  • Ross for Boss — a 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of independent presidential candidate H. Ross Perot.
  • Rum, Romanism and Rebellion - U.S. presidential election, 1884, Republicans attack opposition for views against prohibition, membership by Catholic immigrants and southerners.
  • Sunflowers die in November - 1936 U.S. presidential slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt, reference to his opponent Alf Landon, whose home state of Kansas uses the sunflower as its official state flower.
  • There are two Americas — (2004) Frequent slogan and talking point for Democratic presidential candidate (and later Vice Presidential nominee) John Edwards.
  • There's No Indispensable Man-1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • Tilden or Blood! - 1877 slogan of Samuel Tilden supporters after the election conflict that led to the Compromise of 1877
  • Tippecanoe and Tyler, Too - 1840 U.S. presidential slogan of William Henry Harrison. Tippecanoe a famous 1811 battle Harrison defeated Tecumseh; John Tyler was Harrison's running mate.
  • Turn the Rascals Out - 1872 anti-Grant slogan against the Era of Good Stealings
  • Vote as You Shot - 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • We are turning the corner - 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by republican president Herbert Hoover.
  • We Polked you in '44, We shall Pierce you in '52 - 1852 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Pierce; the '44 referred to the 1844 election of James K. Polk as president.
  • We Want Willkie - 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • Win with Willkie - 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie

Other political slogans (listed alphabetically)

US State Slogans

  • Land of Lincoln — Illinois

Georgia On my mind

References

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