Streisand

Streisand

Streisand, Barbra, 1942-, American singer and actress, b. New York City. Streisand first gained critical and public acclaim for her supporting role in the Broadway musical I Can Get It for You Wholesale (1962). She cemented her fame with her show-stopping portrayal of Fanny Brice in another musical, Funny Girl (1964), and won an Academy Award for her performance in the film version (1968). Noted for her strong, clear soprano voice and her dynamic presence, she has made numerous popular recordings. Among her other films are Hello, Dolly (1969), The Owl and the Pussy Cat (1970), What's Up, Doc? (1972), and The Way We Were (1973). Later films include Yentl (1983), which she also wrote, directed, and produced; The Prince of Tides (1991), which she also directed; and The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996).

See J. Kimbrell, Barbra (2 vol., 1989-92); J. Spada, Streisand: Her Life (1995).

orig. Barbara Joan Streisand

(born April 24, 1942, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.) U.S. singer and actress. She sang in nightclubs before appearing on Broadway in I Can Get It for You Wholesale (1962), and she became a major star with Funny Girl (1964; film and Academy Award, 1968). Her richly beautiful voice made her one of the world's most popular singers in the 1970s and '80s. An exuberant comic and dramatic actress, she starred in movies such as Hello, Dolly! (1969), What's Up Doc? (1972), The Way We Were (1973), and A Star Is Born (1976), and she later directed and starred in Yentl (1983) and The Prince of Tides (1991). She avoided live performances for several years, but in the 1990s she appeared in a series of concerts that broke box office sales records. In 1995 she received a Grammy Award for lifetime achievement.

Learn more about Streisand, Barbra with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Barbara Joan Streisand

(born April 24, 1942, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.) U.S. singer and actress. She sang in nightclubs before appearing on Broadway in I Can Get It for You Wholesale (1962), and she became a major star with Funny Girl (1964; film and Academy Award, 1968). Her richly beautiful voice made her one of the world's most popular singers in the 1970s and '80s. An exuberant comic and dramatic actress, she starred in movies such as Hello, Dolly! (1969), What's Up Doc? (1972), The Way We Were (1973), and A Star Is Born (1976), and she later directed and starred in Yentl (1983) and The Prince of Tides (1991). She avoided live performances for several years, but in the 1990s she appeared in a series of concerts that broke box office sales records. In 1995 she received a Grammy Award for lifetime achievement.

Learn more about Streisand, Barbra with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Mecha-Streisand is episode 12 of Comedy Central's animated series South Park. It was originally broadcast in its first season, on February 18, 1998.

Plot

During a fossil dig, Cartman discovers a mysterious stone triangle only to throw it away. Kyle picks it up instead, and after an archeologist identifies the writing on the triangle as Anasazi, Kyle appears on TV with the find. However, because of its newfound value, Cartman instantly wants the triangle back. After numerous ridiculous measures by Cartman to reclaim the artifact, Kyle tires of the situation and gives the triangle back to Cartman. Meanwhile Leonard Maltin turns up in the town and asks Chef if he has seen Barbra Streisand anywhere. Chef is confused at this, but Maltin explains that if Streisand has seen the news report about the triangle the boys are in great danger.

Later at the bus stop Barbra Streisand lands in her helicopter and demands to know where "the Triangle of Zinthar" is. The boys don't know who she is nor do they want to give her the triangle, which aggravates her. Later on Streisand tricks the boys into thinking that the triangle is hers and that she will give them a monetary reward for it, so she takes them to her condo in the mountains to complete the transaction. Meanwhile Chef is driving Maltin to Streisand's condo, while Maltin explains the situation - Streisand's "mother was a Jackal, and her father was an insurance salesmen" and that she is an "evil, egotistical diabolical bitch" who wants to conquer the world with an ancient relic called "the Diamond of Pantheos". The diamond was split into two separate triangles and hidden at different points of the Earth, but Streisand found one of the pieces during the shooting of My Fair Lady. The other piece happens to be the triangle Cartman found, and according to Maltin if Streisand were to get her hands on that triangle she would become the most evil and dangerous creature to ever walk the Earth - Mecha-Streisand.

Once at her mansion home, Streisand ties up and tortures the boys with medieval torture and her singing until they relent and give up the triangle. She takes the triangle and combines it with the one she had unearthed years before, forming the Diamond of Pantheos. The Diamond transforms Streisand into Mecha-Streisand, a giant mechanical dinosaur-songstress that begins to completely destroy South Park. Shortly thereafter, Leonard Maltin and Chef find Streisand's home and free the boys, who fill them in on what had just occurred.

As Streisand goes about destroying the town, Leonard Maltin transforms into an Ultraman-like superhero, in hopes of defeating the evil Mecha-Streisand. Streisand proves too powerful, though, and Maltin is quickly defeated. Sidney Poitier joins the battle and takes the form of a giant turtle much like Gamera. He, too, is no match for Mecha-Streisand, and South Park appears in utter peril until Robert Smith of The Cure arrives. He morphs into a giant moth, in the form of Mothra, and is told what to do through a wrist-watch, like Giant Robo. Discovering that Mecha-Streisand's weak spot is the nose, Smith is able to punch the Diamond of Pantheos out of her—using the Robot Punch—thus rendering her powerless. Smith is then able to mega-toss the weakened Mecha-Streisand into outer space, where she explodes. After the fighting subsides, the town cheers for Robert Smith, including Jesus, who hails Smith as a 'Savior'. Robert Smith walks off into the sunset while Kyle shouts "Disintegration is the best album ever!"

The boys decide that the diamond is better off separated, as "no one should have that kind of power." However, the episode ends with it being re-discovered, and the boys cowering in the presence of a giant Ike Broflovski, Mecha-Ike.

Kenny's death

During a battle between Mecha Streisand and Leonard Maltin, Kenny avoids all sorts of falling debris with Stan and Kyle. Kenny escapes to the school playground, starts up a game of tetherball, and is strangled to death when the tetherball rope pins him to the pole as it wraps tightly around his neck.

Pop culture references

  • Leonard Maltin mentions to Chef that Barbra Streisand found the first triangle while filming My Fair Lady, despite the fact that Streisand was not in the film.
  • Barbra Streisand took the opportunity of her characterization in this episode to criticize the show, claiming it was bad for children for promoting cynicism. In a later episode, "Spookyfish", her image was again used, apparently in response.
  • The word "Roshambo" (or Rochambeau) is another name for Rock, Paper, Scissors. However, Cartman's concept of Roshambo is for opponents to take turns kicking each other in the testicles until one of them falls over.
  • This episode largely parodies Japanese Kaiju movies, such as Godzilla.
  • In a reference to The Omen, Leonard Maltin explains that Streisand's parents were a Jackal and an insurance salesman.
  • Stan's quote "My mother told me there are no real monsters, but there are" after seeing Mecha-Streisand, is a quote from Newt, the character of the little girl in Aliens.
  • When the reporter says "just weeks after the devastating attack of mutant genetic creatures, zombies, and Thanksgiving turkeys, the town of South Park has managed to rebuild itself" just before Mecha Streisand begins her raid, he is referring to the previous episodes of "An Elephant Makes Love to a Pig", "Pinkeye", and "Starvin' Marvin". This parodies all of the Japanese monster movies, such as Godzilla and Mothra, where large cities such as Tokyo are completely destroyed, only to be completely rebuilt by the time the next movie takes place.
  • Barbara Streisand's $4,000,000 complex is a reference to the Lethal Weapon 2 complex, the one Mel Gibson pulls down with a truck.
  • Inside Streisand's manor, there is a poster of herself with Satan, who signed the poster: "Love, mi amor, Satan".

External links

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