Starr

Starr

[stahr]
Starr, Belle, 1848?-89, American outlaw, b. near Carthage, Mo. Her original name was Myra Belle (or Maybelle) Shirley. Her family members were Confederate sympathizers, and her father was a farmer who later operated a tavern in Carthage, where she spent her childhood. The Shirleys subsequently (1864) moved to Scyene, near Dallas, Tex. Early in her life Belle met Cole Younger, with whom she was long (and probably falsely) rumored to have had a child. She also became close to Jesse James and his gang, the rest of the Youngers, and other outlaws, many of whom, like her brother, had served with Quantrill's raiders during the Civil War. In 1866 she married the outlaw Jim Reed. After he was killed she wed (1880) Sam Starr, a Cherokee outlaw, and went to live in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Her home there became a retreat for outlaws, for whom she operated mainly as a "fixer" with the legal authorities. In 1883 she and Starr were convicted of horse-stealing and briefly imprisoned. Starr's reputation as a notorious horse thief and murderess was greatly magnified in Richard K. Fox's popular novel Bella Starr, the Bandit Queen; or, the Female Jesse James (1889), written after she was shot to death by an unknown assailant.

See biographies by B. Rascoe (1941), E. P. Hicks (1963), C. W. Breiham (1970), G. Shirley (1982), and P. W. Steele (1989).

Starr, Kenneth Winston, 1946-, American public official; b. Vernon, Tex. Educated at Harding College and George Washington Univ., he studied law at Duke. After clerking for Chief Justic Warren Burger and working in the Justice Dept., he served on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Later he was solicitor general (1989-93) in the Bush administration, then practiced law privately. In Aug., 1994, he was named Whitewater prosecutor, replacing Robert Fiske. Starr's office gradually expanded the scope of its investigations of President Clinton and his administration, but without striking success, until, in Jan., 1998, his inquiry was expanded to included the president's role in what became the Lewinsky scandal. Clinton's defenders criticized the conservative Starr as ideologically motivated, and his report to the House of Representatives, setting out a case for impeachment, was attacked as prejudicially detailed. After the impeachment and acquittal of the president, Starr seemed to agree that the law establishing the independent counsel should not be renewed, although he strongly defended his actions. The law lapsed in June, 1999, and he resigned the Whitewater post in October. He has written First among Equals (2002), a conservative examination of the late-20th-century Supreme Court.
orig. Myra Belle Shirley

(born Feb. 5, 1848, Washington county, Mo., U.S.—died Feb. 3, 1889, near Briartown, Okla.) U.S. outlaw. She grew up in Missouri and later moved to a farm at Scyene, near Dallas, Texas. She bore a child by the outlaw Cole Younger (1844–1916) and another by Jim Reed, with whom she rustled cattle and horses in Texas in 1869. She fashioned herself the “bandit queen,” dressing in velvet and feathers or buckskin and moccasins. In 1880 she became the common-law wife of Sam Starr, and their Oklahoma ranch became an outlaws' hideout. Sam was killed in a gunfight in 1886, and Belle herself was later shot down near her ranch.

Learn more about Starr, Belle with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 19, 1851, near Gainesville, N.Y., U.S.—died Sept. 19, 1931, Stanford, Calif.) U.S. educator and ichthyologist. He studied at Cornell University and taught at universities in Indiana until 1885, when he became president of Indiana University. In 1891 he became the first president of Stanford University, and served until 1913. His extensive field trips led to his naming 1,085 genera and more than 2,500 species of fishes. He was coauthor (with B.W. Evermann) of The Fishes of North and Middle America (1896–1900) and author of Manual of the Vertebrates of the Northern United States (13 editions, 1876–1929). He devoted his later career mainly to the cause of international peace, acting as chief director of the World Peace Foundation.

Learn more about Jordan, David Starr with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 19, 1851, near Gainesville, N.Y., U.S.—died Sept. 19, 1931, Stanford, Calif.) U.S. educator and ichthyologist. He studied at Cornell University and taught at universities in Indiana until 1885, when he became president of Indiana University. In 1891 he became the first president of Stanford University, and served until 1913. His extensive field trips led to his naming 1,085 genera and more than 2,500 species of fishes. He was coauthor (with B.W. Evermann) of The Fishes of North and Middle America (1896–1900) and author of Manual of the Vertebrates of the Northern United States (13 editions, 1876–1929). He devoted his later career mainly to the cause of international peace, acting as chief director of the World Peace Foundation.

Learn more about Jordan, David Starr with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Myra Belle Shirley

(born Feb. 5, 1848, Washington county, Mo., U.S.—died Feb. 3, 1889, near Briartown, Okla.) U.S. outlaw. She grew up in Missouri and later moved to a farm at Scyene, near Dallas, Texas. She bore a child by the outlaw Cole Younger (1844–1916) and another by Jim Reed, with whom she rustled cattle and horses in Texas in 1869. She fashioned herself the “bandit queen,” dressing in velvet and feathers or buckskin and moccasins. In 1880 she became the common-law wife of Sam Starr, and their Oklahoma ranch became an outlaws' hideout. Sam was killed in a gunfight in 1886, and Belle herself was later shot down near her ranch.

Learn more about Starr, Belle with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Starr is a town in Anderson County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 173 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Starr is located at (34.377983, -82.693870).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.8 km²), all of it land.

Education

Elementary Schools in Starr:

  • Starr Elementary
  • Flat Rock Elementary

Middle Schools in Starr:

  • Starr-Iva Middle School

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 173 people, 74 households, and 50 families residing in the town. The population density was 116.8 people per square mile (45.1/km²). There were 82 housing units at an average density of 55.4/sq mi (21.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.22% White, 3.47% African American, 0.58% from other races, and 1.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.89% of the population.

There were 74 households out of which 24.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.5% were married couples living together, 5.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the town the population was spread out with 19.1% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 31.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $34,167, and the median income for a family was $41,875. Males had a median income of $27,250 versus $21,875 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,350. About 25.0% of families and 29.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 46.3% of those under the age of eighteen and 18.5% of those sixty five or over.

References

External links

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