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Sloan

Sloan

[slohn]
Sloan, Alfred Pritchard, Jr., 1875-1966, American businessman and philanthropist, b. New Haven, Conn., grad. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1895. He began his career as a draftsman for the Hyatt Roller Bearing Company, becoming its president in 1901; under his leadership the income and assets of the company were greatly increased. He sold the company to General Motors in 1916 and later became its president. As head of General Motors, Sloan inaugurated "standard procedures" (i.e., rules to effect better management); he was chairman of the board from 1937 to 1956. His philanthropic interests extended to many institutions, including the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research and the Sloan Foundation. He wrote My Years with General Motors (1964).
Sloan, John, 1871-1951, American painter and etcher, b. Lock Haven, Pa. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and worked for 12 years as an illustrator on the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Press. In 1905 he went to New York City, where he worked as an illustrator. A member of the Eight, he was active in organizing the Society of Independent Artists and was its president from 1918. Long a popular teacher at the Art Students League of New York City, he was elected president in 1930. His scenes of city life and his nude studies are in leading museums throughout the United States. Characteristic are McSorley's Bar (Detroit Inst. of Arts); Renganeschi's, Saturday Night (Art Inst., Chicago); Wake of the Ferry (Phillips Memorial Gall., Washington, D.C.); and Nude with Nine Apples (Whitney Mus., New York City). Sloan's painting owes its distinction to a natural interest in human beings, whose life he portrayed with a directness often verging on satire. As an etcher he was equally gifted.

See his Gist of Art (1939); his correspondence ed. by B. St. John (1965); prints by P. Morse (1969); biographies by B. St. John (1971) and J. Loughery (1995); studies by L. Goodrich (1952), V. W. Brooks (1955), and D. W. Scott and E. J. Bullard (1971).

(born May 23, 1875, New Haven, Conn., U.S.—died Feb. 17, 1966, New York, N.Y.) U.S. corporate executive. He began his career at the Hyatt Roller Bearing Co. in New Jersey and became its president at age 26. Hyatt was later acquired by General Motors Corp. (GM), and Sloan rose to become president and chief executive officer of GM in 1923. Under his leadership it surpassed Ford Motor Co. in sales and became the largest corporation in the world. He served as chairman of the board from 1937 to his retirement in 1956. A noted philanthropist, he endowed the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and contributed to the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and to the school of management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Learn more about Sloan, Alfred P(ritchard), Jr. with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born May 23, 1875, New Haven, Conn., U.S.—died Feb. 17, 1966, New York, N.Y.) U.S. corporate executive. He began his career at the Hyatt Roller Bearing Co. in New Jersey and became its president at age 26. Hyatt was later acquired by General Motors Corp. (GM), and Sloan rose to become president and chief executive officer of GM in 1923. Under his leadership it surpassed Ford Motor Co. in sales and became the largest corporation in the world. He served as chairman of the board from 1937 to his retirement in 1956. A noted philanthropist, he endowed the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and contributed to the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and to the school of management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Learn more about Sloan, Alfred P(ritchard), Jr. with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Sloan is a city in Woodbury County, Iowa, United States. It is part of the Sioux City/Iowa/Nebraska/South Dakota Metropolitan Statistical Area.The population was 1,032 at the 2000 census.

Economy

The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska (Ho-Chunk) has the WinnaVegas Casino near Sloan. WinnaVegas Casino

Geography

Sloan is located at (42.233065, -96.224419).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.2 km²), all of it land. The town is on the floodplain of the Missouri River, and is located on Interstate 29.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,032 people, 427 households, and 284 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,217.4 people per square mile (847.8/km²). There were 449 housing units at an average density of 964.7/sq mi (368.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.38% White, 0.10% African American, 1.16% Native American, 0.29% Asian, and 1.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.87% of the population.

There were 427 households out of which 35.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.3% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 85.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,026, and the median income for a family was $50,667. Males had a median income of $33,393 versus $23,068 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,310. About 4.0% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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