Shore

Shore

[shawr, shohr]
Shore, Jane, or Elizabeth Shore, d. 1527?, mistress of Edward IV of England. The wife of William Shore, a goldsmith, she became c.1470 mistress to Edward IV and exerted a great influence over the king. After Edward's death (1483) she became the mistress of Thomas Grey, 1st marquess of Dorset, and then of Lord Hastings. Probably only out of political motives, she was accused of sorcery (1483) by Richard III, placed in the Tower of London, and later forced to do public penance as a harlot. Her great beauty attracted the king's solicitor, Thomas Lynon, but their proposed marriage failed to come about, and Jane died in poverty. Her life was the subject of Nicholas Rowe's Tragedy of Jane Shore (1714).
shore: see coast; beach.

A shore or shoreline is the fringe of land at the edge of a large body of water, such as an ocean, sea, or lake.

Shores are influenced by the topography of the surrounding landscape, as well as by water induced erosion, such as waves. The geological composition of rock and soil dictates the type of shore which is created. Although a beach is a synonym for a shore, the term typically refers to shores which are sandy or pebbly, which can be produced by erosion of sedimentary soils.

A strict definition is the strip of land along a water body that is alternately exposed and covered by waves and tides. Shores may also include a strip of land by a body of water, such as a lake.

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