Definitions

scrambled

Scrambled eggs

Scrambled eggs is a dish made from beaten whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken). The dish often contains other ingredients. Cream, butter, milk, water or oil will dilute the egg proteins to create a softer texture.

Sample preparation

The eggs are scrambled or beaten in a small cup with a whisk, fork, or chopsticks to blend the egg white and yolk into a homogeneous liquid. Cheese may be added into the eggs at this phase as well. Liquid items may be added to create a softer texture, including stock, cream, butter, milk, water or oil. The amount of liquid added is typically about 2 tsp (10mL) liquid per egg. Some salt and pepper or other seasoning can be added to taste as well.

Eggs may be prepared in a sauté pan, frying pan, or on a griddle. A non-stick surface will require much less cooking fat. A seasoned cast-iron skillet is ideal. The sauté pan, frying pan or griddle is heated to medium heat and coated with melted butter, margarine, or cooking oil to prevent sticking. The eggs are poured into the pan and coagulate almost immediately. The heat is turned down to low and the eggs are constantly stirred as they cook. For best results both the pan and the stirring implement are kept in constant motion to help create smaller and softer curds. The lower the heat and the more constant the movement, the creamier the end product.

Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs or cheese (which have been warmed) may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs should be slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to cook for a time afterwards. If this technique is followed, the eggs should be moist in texture with a creamy consistency. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs, this is a sign of under cooking or adding overcooked high-moisture vegetables.

Other methods of preparation

A double boiler may be used if cooking at low heat is desired. cook in the same method as described above using the double boiler or au Bain Marie as the heating source, which will not need adjustment as the direct heading method would. Cooking by this method will prevent the eggs from browning while being cooked. This method was used in the "old classical kitchen" and guarantees the eggs are always cooked perfectly, but it is extremely time-consuming. Scrambled eggs may also be made in a stove by placing the ingredients in a metal bowl and alternately cooking for 30 minutes and whisking until the desired consistency is achieved. Various health movements have led to the increased popularity of scrambled egg whites alone.

Serving Options

Classical haute cuisine preparation calls for serving the dish in a deep silver dish. They can also be presented in small Croustades made from hollowed-out Brioche or tartlets. When eaten for breakfast, scrambled eggs often accompany toast, hash browns, pancakes, bacon or sausages. Popular condiments served with scrambled eggs are ketchup, hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce.

Variations of Scrambled Egg Dishes

  • scrambled eggs à l'arlésienne - add the diced, cooked pulp of courgettes (zucchini) along with a concentrated garlic-flavored tomato fondue (1 tablespoon per 2 eggs). The cooked eggs are then placed into the hollowed, cooked courgettes shells, placed on an oiled gratin dish sprinkled with Parmesan cheese and browned in a 475 degree oven.
  • scrambled eggs à l'américaine - Add cubes of smoked bacon fried in butter to eggs. When cooked, mound on plate garnished with slices of broiled bacon and small grilled tomato halves.
  • scrambled eggs argenteuil - Scramble the eggs, garnish with asparagus tips which have been parboiled in salted water and them slowly cooked in butter. Serve with triangle shaped croûtons and cream sauce.
  • scrambled egg and asparagus barquettes- Cook the eggs and prepare asparagus tips by parboiling and slowly cooking in butter. Fill barquettes with scrambled eggs and garnish with asparagus tips. Top with melted butter and warm in oven.
  • scrambled eggs à la Bercy - Grill or broil some chipolata sausages. Arrange scrambled eggs in a pie dish. Garnish with cooked sausage and a "ribbon" of tomato sauce.
  • scrambled eggs Massenet - Parboil some asparagus tips and cook them slowly in butter. Boil or steam some artichoke hearts, dice and sauté them in butter. While preparing scrambled eggs, add artichoke hearts. Plate in a mound and garnish with asparagus.
  • scrambled eggs princesse - Prepare scramble eggs and pour into a bowl. Garnish with asparagus tips stewed in butter, julienne of white chicken meat bound with suprême sauce and some truffle slivers heated in butter.
  • scrambled eggs à la reine - Make a very thick puree with cooked chicken breast and some suprême sauce. Bake a large vol-au-vent case and keep it warm. Cook the scrambled eggs until just creamy. Layer the scrambled eggs and chicken puree in alternating layers inside the vol-au-vent case. Serve hot with suprême sauce on the side in a sauce boat.
  • scrambled eggs à la romaine - Cook 800g (1.75 lb) spinach in butter. Scramble 8 eggs with 50g (2 oz.) grated Parmesan cheese. Cut 8 oil-packed anchovies into small pieces, add to the spinach and spread the mixture over the base of a buttered gratin dish. Arrange eggs on top of spinach mixture and sprinkle with 25-40g (1-1.5 oz.) grated Parmesan cheese along with some melted butter. Brown under a broiler.
  • scrambled eggs Rossini - Cook some scrambled eggs. Sauté some thin slices of foie gras in butter. Cook some sliced truffle in butter. Plate the scrambled eggs on a serving dish, garnish with foie gras and truffles, then coat with a very reduced Madeira-flavored demi-glace sauce.
  • scrambled eggs with sucuk or pastırma;Sucuklu yumurta and Pastırmalı yumurta respectively - Scrambled eggs are mixed with Turkish beef sausages. It is cooked in a sahan with butter or olive oil. Some tomato can be added. In Turkey it is eaten for breakfast.
  • scrambled eggs with digüeñes - a varaition from Chilean cuisine in which the eggs are fried together with the native fungus cyttaria espinosae.

Non-Fresh Egg Products used for Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled egg products are available in various forms for use in the professional kitchen and for use at home. These products were created for eases of use in the professional kitchen. They also lower or eliminate the risk of bacterial infection due to salmonella. Different products available include:

  • Liquid Whole Eggs - This product is a homogenization of both the egg white and yolk. The eggs are pasteurized which destroys any harmful bacteria. They are usually packaged in pourable containers. Many unopened products can be held for up to three months.
  • Liquid Egg Whites - The yolks are separated from the eggs and the whites are pasteurized. They are usually packaged in pourable containers. These can be used to make scrambled egg whites.
  • Liquid Egg Substitute - A lower cholesterol product sold in frozen or unfrozen format. Many substitutes are made from egg whites only, and ingredients are added for the yolks. Some of these additional ingredients may include tofu, skim milk, starch, and artificial flavorings.
  • Powdered Whole Eggs - The powder is a pasteurized freeze-dried product that require the addition of water to rehydrate. Once rehydrated the eggs may be used in the same way as fresh eggs. There is a noticeable difference in flavor. They generally have a long shelf life, which can be up to a year and do not require refrigeration.
  • Powdered Egg Substitute - This powder is generally made from freeze-dried separated egg whites. Some of the ingredients used instead of the yolks include starch, yeast extract, gum, and artificial flavorings and color. Some powdered egg substitutes are egg free and are produced from ingredients that simulate the texture and flavor of eggs. They are prepared by adding water to them and used in the same way as fresh eggs. These require no refrigeration and have a long shelf life.
  • Frozen Egg Product (Uncooked) - These are liquid egg products that have been pasteurized and flash frozen. They can be purchased as whole egg products or separated into whites as well. They are defrosted and used in the same way as liquid or fresh eggs.
  • Frozen Egg Product (Cooked) - Generally relegated to the grocery freezer section for home usage, these products are precooked and frozen into portions in microwaveable packaging.

See also

External links

Notes

Works Cited

  • Escoffier, Georges Auguste. Escoffier: The Complete Guide to the Art of Modern Cookery. Translated by H. L. Cracknell and R.J. Kaufmann. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2002
  • McGee, Harold. On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. New York: Scribner, 2004.
  • Robuchon, Joël, Members of the Gastronomic Committee. Larousse Gastronomique. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2001.

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