schnauzer

schnauzer

[shnou-zer; Ger. shnou-tsuhr]
schnauzer, a sturdy, wirehaired dog developed in S Germany. There are three separate breeds of schnauzer distinguished by their size. The standard schnauzer is a medium-sized dog whose existence in Germany dates back to the 15th cent. It stands from 17 to 20 in. (43.1-50.8 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 27 to 37 lb (12.3-16.8 kg). The giant schnauzer, developed at the end of the 19th cent. by crossing the standard schnauzer with various native sheepherding and farm dogs and later the Great Dane, stands from 211/2 to 251/2 in. (54.6-64.8 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 65 to 78 lb (29.5-35.4 kg). The miniature schnauzer, also developed around the end of the 19th cent., resulted from the crossing of standard schnauzer to affenpinscher. It stands from 12 to 14 in. (30.5-35.6 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 13 to 15 lb (5.9-6.8 kg). The coat of all three breeds may be pepper and salt, silver, or black in color. The standard schnauzer, listed by the American Kennel Club in the working-dog group, was originally used as a ratter, farm dog, and guardian. Later, both it and the giant schnauzer, also a working dog and bred especially for driving cattle, were used in police work. The miniature schnauzer is classified in the terrier group and has been raised primarily as a pet. See dog.

Any of three German dog breeds having a wiry black, salt-and-pepper, or black-and-tan coat. The standard, 17–20 in. (43–51 cm) high and weighing 26–37 lbs (12–17 kg), dates to the 15th century; it has a blunt, heavily whiskered muzzle and a squared body. The miniature, 12–14 in. (30–36 cm) high and weighing 13–15 lbs (6–7 kg), was developed in the 19th century from standard schnauzers and affenpinschers. The giant schnauzer, a cross between the standard and various working dogs, stands 21–26 in. (53–66 cm) and weighs 66–77 lbs (30–35 kg).

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A schnauzer (plural schnauzers) is a German dog type which originated in Germany in the 1400s and 1500s. The term comes from the German word for snout "Schnauze"' because of the dog's distinctly furry muzzles. The type consists of three breeds: the giant, standard, and miniature schnauzer. The original schnauzer was of the same size as the modern standard schnauzer breed, and were bred as rat catchers, yard dogs, and guard dogs. The miniature schnauzer is the result of crossing the original schnauzer with affenpinschers and poodles. The giant schnauzer is the result of crossing the original schnauzer with Great Danes, Bouviers, and Collies; they were used to herd and drive cattle.

Miniature schnauzers are around one foot (30 cm) tall at the shoulder and weigh between 13 and 23 pounds (five to seven kg). Miniature schnauzers have high energy levels and are very intelligent. Miniature schnauzers may also be silver and black. They can live outside but love to spend time with their owners. They make great pets as they are loyal companions and are rarely aggressive towards strangers. Although they very rarely show signs of aggression towards strangers, they can make very efficient alarms. "Mini" schnauzers are very good family dogs and loveable companions for children.

Standard schnauzers are around 1 1/2 feet (46 cm) tall at the shoulder and weigh 26 to 37 pounds (12 to 17 kg). They are in the group of working dogs. Standard schnauzers have been used to catch rats and as a guard dog. They have also carried messages in times of war, helped the Red Cross, and have been police dogs.

Giant schnauzers are around two feet (60 cm) tall at the shoulder and weigh between 66 and 78 pounds (30 to 35 kg). They also are working dogs. Giant schnauzers helped herd cattle. They also used to help bd also were guard dogs at breweries. All schnauzers have dense, wiry, stiff fur. Schnauzers have long whiskers on their faces. Their fur coats are a mixture of black and white like salt and pepper. They may also be solid black.

References

Encyclopedia of Animals

See also

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