Sansovino

Sansovino

[san-soh-vee-noh; It. sahn-saw-vee-naw]
Sansovino, Andrea, c.1460-1529, Florentine sculptor and architect of the High Renaissance, b. Monte Sansavino. His real name was Andrea Contucci. He trained under Antonio Pollaiuolo and worked in Florence, Rome, and Loreto. His tombs of Cardinals Sforza and Basso in Rome and his statues and reliefs for church decoration, such as the graceful Virgin and Child with St. Anne (1512) at San Agostino, were greatly admired.
Sansovino, Jacopo, 1486-1570, Italian sculptor and architect of the Renaissance. His surname was taken in place of his own, Tatti, as homage to the Florentine sculptor Andrea Sansovino, under whom he was apprenticed. After early years devoted to sculpture, he was architect of several buildings in Rome and in 1527 moved to Venice, importing to that city the classic manner of high Roman Renaissance architecture. In Venice, besides his masterpiece, the Library of St. Mark's (designed 1536) in the Piazza San Marco, he built the Palazzo Corner della Ca' Grande, the mint, the loggia at the base of the great campanile, and several churches. His versatility as a sculptor is realized in his creation of the supple figure Apollo and the three other imposing statues in the niches of the campanile: Minerva, Mercury, and Peace. Among his other sculptural works are the gigantic Mars and Neptune outside the Doge's palace.
orig. Jacopo Tatti

(born July 2, 1486, Florence, Republic of Florence—died Nov. 27, 1570, Venice, Republic of Venice) Italian sculptor and architect. He trained in Florence under Andrea Sansovino, whose name he adopted. In 1505–06 he moved to Rome to study architecture and work on the restoration of ancient sculpture. After the sack of Rome in 1527 he fled to Venice, where he was appointed state architect (1529). His Library of St. Mark's (begun 1537) is one of the major architectural works of the 16th century. His vivid sculptures were often important decorative elements of his buildings. His best-known statues are the colossal figures of Mars and Neptune on the staircase of the Doges' Palace (1554–66). He was more successful than any other Renaissance architect in fusing architecture and sculpture.

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orig. Andrea Contucci

(born circa 1467, Monte San Savino, Republic of Florence—died 1529, Monte San Savino) Italian sculptor. The fine detail and high emotional pitch of his marble Altar of the Sacrament in Florence's Santo Spirito (1485–90) typify his early work; his marble Baptism of Christ (1502), above one of the Baptistery doors in Florence, marks a shift to High Renaissance style with its dignified poses and strong but controlled emotion. His tombs for two cardinals in Rome's Santa Maria del Popolo (completed 1509) were his most influential innovation, with their triumphal-arch form and the novel sleeping attitude of the deceased cardinals. His works display the transition from early to High Renaissance, and his graceful style acted as a counterbalance to Michelangelo's titanic, muscular sculpture throughout the 16th century.

Learn more about Sansovino, Andrea with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Jacopo Tatti

(born July 2, 1486, Florence, Republic of Florence—died Nov. 27, 1570, Venice, Republic of Venice) Italian sculptor and architect. He trained in Florence under Andrea Sansovino, whose name he adopted. In 1505–06 he moved to Rome to study architecture and work on the restoration of ancient sculpture. After the sack of Rome in 1527 he fled to Venice, where he was appointed state architect (1529). His Library of St. Mark's (begun 1537) is one of the major architectural works of the 16th century. His vivid sculptures were often important decorative elements of his buildings. His best-known statues are the colossal figures of Mars and Neptune on the staircase of the Doges' Palace (1554–66). He was more successful than any other Renaissance architect in fusing architecture and sculpture.

Learn more about Sansovino, Jacopo with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Andrea Contucci

(born circa 1467, Monte San Savino, Republic of Florence—died 1529, Monte San Savino) Italian sculptor. The fine detail and high emotional pitch of his marble Altar of the Sacrament in Florence's Santo Spirito (1485–90) typify his early work; his marble Baptism of Christ (1502), above one of the Baptistery doors in Florence, marks a shift to High Renaissance style with its dignified poses and strong but controlled emotion. His tombs for two cardinals in Rome's Santa Maria del Popolo (completed 1509) were his most influential innovation, with their triumphal-arch form and the novel sleeping attitude of the deceased cardinals. His works display the transition from early to High Renaissance, and his graceful style acted as a counterbalance to Michelangelo's titanic, muscular sculpture throughout the 16th century.

Learn more about Sansovino, Andrea with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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