Definitions

Rudyard

Rudyard

[ruhd-yerd]
Kipling, Rudyard, 1865-1936, English author, b. Bombay (now Mumbai), India. Educated in England, Kipling returned to India in 1882 and worked as an editor on a Lahore paper. His early poems were collected in Departmental Ditties (1886), Barrack-Room Ballads (1892), and other volumes. His first short stories of Anglo-Indian life appeared in Plain Tales from the Hills (1888) and Soldiers Three (1888). In 1889 he returned to London, where his novel The Light That Failed (1890) appeared. Kipling's masterful stories and poems interpreted India in all its heat, strife, and ennui. His romantic imperialism and his characterization of the true Englishman as brave, conscientious, and self-reliant did much to enhance his popularity. These views are reflected in such well-known poems as "The White Man's Burden," "Loot," "Mandalay," "Gunga Din," and Recessional (1897).

In London in 1892, he married Caroline Balestier, an American, and lived in Vermont for four years. There he wrote children's stories, The Jungle Book (1894) and Second Jungle Book (1895), Kim (1901), Just So Stories (1902), and Captains Courageous (1897). Returning to England in 1900, he lived in Sussex, the setting of Puck of Pook's Hill (1906). Other works include Stalky and Co. (1899) and his famous poem "If" (1910). England's first Nobel Prize winner in literature (1907), he is buried in Westminster Abbey.

See his Something of Myself (1937); biographies by J. I. M. Stewart (1966), J. Harrison (1982), H. Ricketts (2000), and D. Gilmour (2002); studies by J. M. S. Tompkins (2d ed. 1965), V. A. Shashane (1973), R. F. Moss (1982), P. Mallett, ed. (1989), and W. B. Dillingham (2008).

Rudyard Kipling.

(born Dec. 30, 1865, Bombay, India—died Jan. 18, 1936, London, Eng.) Indian-born British novelist, short-story writer, and poet. The son of a museum curator, he was reared in England but returned to India as a journalist. He soon became famous for volumes of stories, beginning with Plain Tales from the Hills (1888; including “The Man Who Would Be King”), and later for the poetry collection Barrack-Room Ballads (1892; including “Gunga Din” and “Mandalay”). His poems, often strongly rhythmic, are frequently narrative ballads. During a residence in the U.S., he published a novel, The Light That Failed (1890); the two Jungle Books (1894, 1895), stories of the wild boy Mowgli in the Indian jungle that have become children's classics; the adventure story Captains Courageous (1897); and Kim (1901), one of the great novels of India. He wrote six other volumes of short stories and several other verse collections. His children's books include the famous Just So Stories (1902) and the fairy-tale collection Puck of Pook's Hill (1906). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907. His extraordinary popularity in his own time declined as his reputation suffered after World War I because of his widespread image as a jingoistic imperialist.

Learn more about Kipling, (Joseph) Rudyard with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Rudyard is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hill County, Montana, United States. The population was 275 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Rudyard is located at (48.560633, -110.554737).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.4 km²), all of it land.

Rudyard is the only settled community in the continental United States which has an antipode on dry land. It corresponds to an area on the Kerguelen Islands. Two other uninhabited areas in Colorado also have antipodes, tied to Île Saint-Paul and Île Amsterdam.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 275 people, 126 households, 71 families, and one old sorehead residing in the CDP. The population density was 295.8 people per square mile (114.2/km²). There were 155 housing units at an average density of 166.7/sq mi (64.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.18% White, 0.73% Native American, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.36% of the population.

There were 126 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.2% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.9% were non-families. 38.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 2.9% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 100.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.3 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $28,393, and the median income for a family was $34,844. Males had a median income of $25,694 versus $15,833 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $16,889. About 7.2% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.9% of those under the age of eighteen and none of those sixty five or over.

References

External links

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