rosé

Santa Rosa

[san-tuh roh-zuh; for 2 also Sp. sahn-tah raw-sah]

City (pop., 2000: 147,595), western California, U.S. Santa Rosa lies at the foot of the Sonoma Mountains, northwest of San Francisco. Founded in 1833 and incorporated in 1868, it developed as a processing and shipping centre for the agricultural produce of the Sonoma valley. The economy relies on retail services catering to an increasing residential population. The city was the site of the home and gardens of plant breeder Luther Burbank. Nearby is the Jack London Memorial.

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(born June 20, 1615, Arenella, Sicily, Spanish Habsburg—died March 15, 1673, Rome, Papal States) Italian painter and etcher. He studied in Naples, where he came under the influence of José de Ribera, but most of his career was spent in Rome, with an interlude in Florence under the patronage of a Medici cardinal. His landscapes, marine paintings, and battle scenes are known for their picturesquely wild, romantic qualities. A flamboyant personality, he was also an accomplished poet, satirist, actor, and musician.

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Rosa Luxemburg.

(born March 5, 1871, Zamość, Pol., Russian Empire—died Jan. 15, 1919, Berlin, Ger.) Polish-born German political radical, intellectual, and author. As a Jew in Russian-controlled Poland, she was drawn early into underground political activism. In 1889 she fled to Zürich, Switz., where she obtained her doctorate. Having become involved in the international socialist movement, in 1892 she cofounded what would become the Polish Communist Party. The Russian Revolution of 1905 convinced her that the world revolution would originate in Russia. She advocated the mass strike as the proletariat's most important tool. Imprisoned in Warsaw for agitation, she then moved to Berlin to teach and write (1907–14). Early in World War I she cofounded the Spartacus League (see Spartacists), and in 1918 she oversaw its transformation into the German Communist Party; she was murdered during the Spartacus Revolt less than a month later. She believed in a democratic path to socialism after a world revolution to overthrow capitalism and opposed what she recognized as Vladimir Ilich Lenin's emerging dictatorship.

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(born March 16, 1822, Bordeaux, France—died May 25, 1899, Melun) French animal painter. She was trained by her father, an art teacher, and began exhibiting regularly at the Paris Salon in 1841. Her unsentimental paintings of lions, tigers, horses, and other animals became very popular; The Horse Fair (1853) gained her an international reputation. A colourful personality, she dressed as a man to study horses at the actual Horse Fair in Paris, receiving formal permission from the police to do so. In 1865 she became the first woman to receive the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour.

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Rosa Luxemburg.

(born March 5, 1871, Zamość, Pol., Russian Empire—died Jan. 15, 1919, Berlin, Ger.) Polish-born German political radical, intellectual, and author. As a Jew in Russian-controlled Poland, she was drawn early into underground political activism. In 1889 she fled to Zürich, Switz., where she obtained her doctorate. Having become involved in the international socialist movement, in 1892 she cofounded what would become the Polish Communist Party. The Russian Revolution of 1905 convinced her that the world revolution would originate in Russia. She advocated the mass strike as the proletariat's most important tool. Imprisoned in Warsaw for agitation, she then moved to Berlin to teach and write (1907–14). Early in World War I she cofounded the Spartacus League (see Spartacists), and in 1918 she oversaw its transformation into the German Communist Party; she was murdered during the Spartacus Revolt less than a month later. She believed in a democratic path to socialism after a world revolution to overthrow capitalism and opposed what she recognized as Vladimir Ilich Lenin's emerging dictatorship.

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(born March 16, 1822, Bordeaux, France—died May 25, 1899, Melun) French animal painter. She was trained by her father, an art teacher, and began exhibiting regularly at the Paris Salon in 1841. Her unsentimental paintings of lions, tigers, horses, and other animals became very popular; The Horse Fair (1853) gained her an international reputation. A colourful personality, she dressed as a man to study horses at the actual Horse Fair in Paris, receiving formal permission from the police to do so. In 1865 she became the first woman to receive the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour.

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Rosół is a traditional Polish meat broth. The most popular variety is rosół z kury, or clear chicken soup. It is commonly served with fine noodles. A vegetarian version can be made, using vegetable stock cubes.

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