Regime

Regime

[ruh-zheem, rey-, or, sometimes, -jeem]
The word regime (occasionally spelled "régime", particularly in older texts) refers to a set of conditions, most often of a political nature. However, it may also be used synonymously with "regimen", for example in the phrases "exercise regime" or "medical regime".

Politics

In politics, a regime is the form of government: the set of rules, cultural or social norms, etc. that regulate the operation of government and its interactions with society. For instance, the United States has one of the oldest regimes still active in the world, dating to the ratification of its Constitution in 1789.

Science

In scientific discussions, a regime is a class of physical conditions, usually parameterised by some specific measures, where a particular physical phenomenon or boundary condition is significant. Very often a regime corresponds to a limiting condition. The region of measurable parameter space that corresponds to a regime is very often loosely defined. Examples include "the superfluid regime", "the steady state regime" or "the femtosecond regime".

In geography and hydrography, "regime" refers to the changing conditions of river beds and other features, such as systems of sandbars.

Other uses

Political use of "regime" concerns international regulatory agencies (see International regime), which lie outside of the control of national governments. These have more power over a greater range than postal or telecommunications agreements, for example, and constrain national governments.

See also

Notes

Essentials of Comparative Government, Patrick O'Neil.

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