Pressburg

Pressburg

[pres-boork]
Pressburg: see Bratislava, Slovakia.
Pressburg, Treaty of, 1805, peace treaty between Napoleon I of France and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II (also emperor of Austria), signed at Pressburg (now Bratislava, Slovakia). Defeated at Austerlitz, Austria ceded Venetia, Istria, and Dalmatia to Napoleon's kingdom of Italy; acknowledged the elevation of the electors of Bavaria and Württemberg to the rank of kings; ceded Tyrol, Vorarlberg, and Augsburg to Bavaria; and yielded the Hapsburg lands in Swabia to Württemberg and Baden. Austria was allowed to annex Salzburg, and France acquired Piedmont, Parma, and Piacenza.

(Dec. 26, 1805) Agreement signed by Austria and France at Pressburg (now Bratislava, Slvk.) after Napoleon's victories at the Battles of Ulm and Austerlitz. Austria gave up Venetia to Napoleon's kingdom of Italy and the Tirol and Vorarlberg to Bavaria. Austria agreed to admit the electors of Bavaria and Württemberg, allied with Napoleon, to the rank of kings, which further reduced Austrian influence in Germany. Austria's influence was also excluded from Italy. The treaty enabled Napoleon to create a ring of French client states beyond France.

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(Dec. 26, 1805) Agreement signed by Austria and France at Pressburg (now Bratislava, Slvk.) after Napoleon's victories at the Battles of Ulm and Austerlitz. Austria gave up Venetia to Napoleon's kingdom of Italy and the Tirol and Vorarlberg to Bavaria. Austria agreed to admit the electors of Bavaria and Württemberg, allied with Napoleon, to the rank of kings, which further reduced Austrian influence in Germany. Austria's influence was also excluded from Italy. The treaty enabled Napoleon to create a ring of French client states beyond France.

Learn more about Pressburg, Treaty of with a free trial on Britannica.com.

German Pressburg Hungarian Pozsony

City (pop., 2001 prelim.: 428,672), capital of Slovakia. Settled first by Celts and Romans, it was ultimately inhabited by Slavs in the 8th century. As Pressburg, it developed as a trade centre and became a free royal town in 1291. The first university in what was then Hungary was founded there in 1467. The city served as the Hungarian capital (1541–1784) and was the seat of the Diet until 1848. The Treaty of Pressburg (1805) was signed here by Napoleon and Francis II following the Battle of Austerlitz. After World War I, on the formation of Czechoslovakia, it became capital of the province of Slovakia, and it became the national capital on Slovakia's independence in 1992.

Learn more about Bratislava with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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