Definitions

point departure

Hokulea

Hōkūlea is a performance-accurate full-scale replica of a "waa kaulua, a double-hulled Polynesian voyaging canoe. Ancient voyaging canoes were a specialized type of wooden sailing vessel used in ancient Hawaii, whereas Hōkūle‘a is built of plywood, fiberglass and resin. Hōkūle‘a measures LOA, at beam, displaces when empty and can carry another between gear, supplies, and 12 to 16 crew. Fully laden, with her sail area, she is capable of speeds of while reaching in trade winds. Her twin masts are rigged either crab claw or Marconi style and she flies a small jib; she is steered with a long paddle. She has no auxiliary motor so she is towed into harbor by her escort vessel when required. Her name means "star of gladness" in Hawaiian, which refers to Arcturus, a guiding zenith star for Hawaiian navigators. In layman's terms, Arcturus passes directly overhead at Hawaii's latitude so it helps sailors find Hawaii.

Construction and purpose

Hōkūle‘a was launched on 8 March 1975 by the Polynesian Voyaging Society. She is best known for her 1976 Hawaii to Tahiti voyage performed with Polynesian navigation techniques, without modern navigational instruments. The primary goal of the voyage was to further support the anthropological theory of the Asiatic origin of native Oceanic people (Oceania maps:Oceania.jpg, Oceanias Regions.png), of Polynesians and Hawaiians in particular, as the result of purposeful trips through the Pacific, as opposed to passive drifting on currents, or sailing from the Americas. (Scientific results of 2008, from DNA analysis, illuminate this theory of Polynesian settlement.) A secondary goal of the project was to have the canoe and voyage "serve as vehicles for the cultural revitalization of Hawaiians and other Polynesians." (Finney, Voyage of Rediscovery, p. 71)

Description of Hōkūle‘a, the boat, is only part of her story, since she is navigated by non-instrument means. But in 1975, no Hawaiian living knew these ancient techniques for blue water voyaging. To enable the voyage, the Polynesian Voyaging Society recruited the Satawalese Master Navigator Mau Piailug [of the Weriyeng school in the Caroline Islands (Caroline Islands-map.gif) of the Federated States of Micronesia (CIA-FSM.jpg) ] to share his knowledge of non-instrument navigation. While up to six Micronesian navigators still used these traditional methods as of the mid-1970s, only Mau was willing to share his knowledge with the Polynesians.

Mau, who "barely spoke English," realized that by reaching beyond his own culture, through sharing what had been closely-guarded knowledge, he could possibly save it from loss. Through his collaboration with the Polynesian Voyaging Society, Mau's mentorship has helped "spark pride in the Hawaiian and Polynesian culture," leading to "a renaissance of voyaging, canoe building, and non-instrument navigation that has continued to grow, spreading across Polynesia (Map OC-Polynesia.PNG) and reaching to its far corners of Aotearoa [New Zealand] and Rapanui [Easter Island]." (Thompson, Reflections on Mau Piailug, 1996)

Since the 1976 voyage to Tahiti and back, Hōkūle‘a has completed nine more voyages to destinations in Micronesia, Polynesia, Japan, Canada, and the United States, all using ancient wayfinding techniques of celestial navigation. Her most recent voyage began 19 January 2007, when Hōkūle‘a left Hawaii with the voyaging canoe Alingano Maisu on a voyage through Micronesia (Map OC-Micronesia.PNG) and ports in southern Japan. The voyage was expected to take five months. On 9 June 2007, Hōkūle‘a completed the "One Ocean, One People" voyage to Yokohama, Japan. For Hōkūle‘a's next voyage, a three-year circumnavigation is currently in planning stages, to commence February 2011.

When not on a voyage, Hōkūle‘a is moored at the Marine Education Training Center (METC) of Honolulu Community College in Honolulu Harbor.

List of voyages

* Shown at first mention of the crew person's name, denotes this person has passed away according to Polynesian Voyaging Society website, or other source as noted.

1976 Inaugural Voyage

Hōkūle‘a, led by Captain Elia David Kuualoha "Kawika" Kapahulehua* and Navigator Pius Mau "Mau" Piailug, departed Honolua Bay, Maui, Hawaii for Papeete, Tahiti, as part of the celebration of the United States Bicentennial. Mau navigated the leg to Tahiti with only his traditional knowledge and skills while the return leg was navigated using modern methods and tools (compass, nautical charts, sextant, chronometer, dividers, parallel rulers, pencil, nautical almanac).

Legs of Inaugural Voyage

1976 Crew to Tahiti
Navigator: Mau Piailug; Captain: "Kawika" Kapahulehua; Crew: Clifford Ah Mow, Milton "Shorty" Bertelmann, Ben R. Finney, Charles Tommy Holmes*, Sam Kalalau, Boogie Kalama, Buffalo Keaulana, John Kruse, Douglas "Dukie" Kuahulu*, David Henry Lewis*, David B. K. "Dave" Lyman III*, William "Billy" Richards, Rodo Tuku Williams*.

1976 Crew to Hawaii
Navigator: James "Kimo" Lyman; Captain: "Kawika" Kapahulehua; Crew: Abraham "Snake" Ah Hee, Andy Espirto*, Mel Kinney, Francis Kainoa Lee, Gordon Piianaia, Leonard Puputauiki, Penny Rawlins, Keani Reiner*, Charles Nainoa "Nainoa" Thompson, Maka'ala Yates, Ben Young.

1977 Kealaikahiki Project

In English, the Hawaiian "Ke ala i kahiki" means "the path to Tahiti." The "Kealaikahiki Project" recreated the traditional Kealaikahiki Point departure of ancient voyages to Tahiti. Gordon Piianaia's idea to recreate the traditional departures took Hōkūle‘a southeast, across Kealaikahiki Channel between Lānai and Kahoolawe Islands, past Kealaikahiki Point, into the Alenuihāhā Channel and the northeast trade winds. The object was to determine whether Hōkūle‘a, departing from west of the 1976 Honolua Bay, Maui, departure point, would bisect the more easterly 1976 voyage track, and so likely reach Tahiti were she to continue. After heading south for two days, Hōkūle‘a did not bisect the 1976 voyage track, but likely would have further south than anticipated. She came about and returned to Hawaii. The traditional departure point would be used for subsequent sailings to Tahiti.

Legs of Kealaikahiki Project

Crew for Kealaikahiki Project
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Dave Lyman; Crew: Teené Froiseth, Sam Kaai, Sam Kalalau, John Kruse, "Kimo" Lyman, Jerome "Jerry" Muller, Gordon Piianaia, Norman Piianaia, Michael A. Tongg*, Makaala Yates

1978 Tahiti Voyage

A second voyage to Tahiti was aborted when Hōkūle‘a capsized and swamped in high wind and seas southwest of the Island of Molokai, five hours after departing Honolulu's Ala Wai Harbor. The crew hung on to the swamped canoe through the night. Flares launched were unseen by passing aircraft, the emergency radio reached no help. By mid-morning, with no sign of imminent rescue and the swamped canoe drifting farther from land, Eddie Aikau, a North Shore, Oahu, lifeguard of the year, 1977 Duke Kahanamoku champion and big-wave surfer, valiantly attempted to paddle a surfboard to Lānai for help. About nine hours later, flares launched by the crew were spotted by a Hawaiian Airlines flight which circled Hōkūle‘a and radioed the United States Coast Guard ("USCG"). Half an hour later, a USCG search and rescue helicopter was hovering overhead; Hōkūle‘a crew was rescued. The following morning, the USCG Cape Corwin towed the vessel, from 22 miles southwest of Lāau Point, Molokai, back to Honolulu. Despite intensive land, air and sea search, Eddie Aikau was never seen again. Hōkūle‘a carries a Eddieaikau.jpg in his memory. Future voyages will be accompanied by an escort vessel.

Legs of 1978 Tahiti Voyage

  • Ala Wai Harbor, Honolulu, Hawaii, – Papeete, Tahiti, : 16 March 1978 to 18 March 1978 (recovery followed by USCG investigation)

1978 Crew to Tahiti
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Dave Lyman; First Mate: Leon Paoa Sterling; "Snake" Ah Hee, Edward Ryan Makua Hanai "Eddie" Aikau*, Charman Akina, M.D., Wedemeyer Au, Bruce Blankenfeld, Kilila Hugho, Sam Kaai, John Kruse, Marion Lyman, Buddy McGuire, Norman Piianaia, Curt Sumida, Teikiheepo "Tava" Taupu.

1980 Tahiti Voyage

Nainoa Thompson recreated the 1976 voyage to Tahiti to become the first Native Hawaiian in modern times to navigate a canoe thousands of miles without instruments. His mentor, Mau Piailug, sailed as observer. After 29 days at sea, before sighting Mataiva on the way to Tahiti, Mau offered Nainoa only one correction; this was of Nainoa's interpretation of sighting a land-based seabird in mid-morning flight. Such birds generally fly seaward for food at morning and return to land in the evening. While it can usually be assumed that land lies opposite the birds' morning flight direction, this bird spotted mid-morning (during nesting season), carried a fish in its beak. This detail suggested to Mau that the bird's morning flight was not away from land but toward it. The bird was not flying seaward to find more fish, but rather, was returning to land, to feed its young. Leading up to the voyage, an extensive, formal crew training program helped to insure that the voyage would be as safe as possible. Escort boat Ishka followed for safety.

Legs of 1980 Tahiti Voyage

1980 Crew to Tahiti
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Gordon Piianaia; Chad Kalepa Baybayan, "Shorty" Bertelmann, Harry Ho, Sam Kaai, Michael "Buddy" McGuire, Marion Lyman-Mersereau, Mau Piailug, Steve Somsen, Jo Anne Sterling, Leon Paoa Sterling, "Tava" Taupu; Patrick Koon Hung Piimauna Charles "Pat" Aiu, MD* 

1980 Crew to Hawaii
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Gordon Piianaia; Wedemeyer Au, Chad Baybayan, Bruce Blankenfeld, "Snake" Ah Hee, John Kruse, Kainoa Lee, "Kimo" Lyman, Mau Piailug, Steven Somsen, Leon Paoa Sterling, Michael Tongg, Nathan Wong

1985 - 1987 Voyage of Rediscovery

For voyages across the International Date Line, dates shown below are standardized on Hawai‘i time.

In the "Voyage of Rediscovery," Hōkūle‘a traveled a total distance of to destinations throughout Polynesia. Inviting fellow Polynesians to join the crew on legs of the voyage extended Hōkūle‘a's success in revitalizing interest in Polynesian culture. For instance, professional Tongan sea captain Sione Taupeamuhu was aboard during a night passage from Tongatapu to Nomuka in the northerly Haapai Islands group of Tonga (Tonga.jpg). He was skeptical that Hōkūle‘a navigator Nainoa Thompson could find Nomuka without instruments. When Nomuka appeared on the horizon at dawn as anticipated, Taupeamuhu remarked, "Now I can believe the stories of my ancestors. Dorcas and Maalaea served as escort vessels.

Legs of Voyage of Rediscovery

1985 Crew to Tahiti
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: "Shorty" Bertelmann; Crew: Clay Bertelmann*, Dennis Chun, Richard Tai Crouch, Harry Ho, Dr. Larry Magnussen, "Buddy" McGuire, Mau Piailug, Thomas Reity (Satawal), James Shizuru, "Tava" Taupu
1985 Crew to Rarotonga
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Gordon Piianaia; Crew: "Snake" Ah Hee, Dr. Pat Aiu, Chad Baybayan, Karim Cowan (Tahiti), Bob Krauss, John Kruse, Vic Lipman, Mel Paoa, Mau Piailug, Abraham Piianaia, Chad Piianaia, Michael Tongg, Andrew Tutai (Cook Islands), Peter Sepelalur (Satawal), Leon Paoa Sterllng, Puaniho Tauotaha (Tahiti), Cliff Watson. (Bob Krauss, journalist; Karim Cowan, and Puaniho Tauotaha were crew members only from Tahiti to Raiatea)
1985 Crew to Waitangi
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain and 1st Watch Captain: "Shorty" Bertelmann; 2nd Watch Captain: Leon Paoa Sterling; 3rd Watch Captain: "Tava" Taupu (Marquesas); Crew: Dr. Pat Aiu, Chad Baybayan, Bruce Blankenfeld, Stanley Conrad (New Zealand), Dr. Ben Finney, Harry Ho, "Buddy" McGuire, "Billy" Richards, James Shizuru, Michael Tongg

1986 Crew to Nukualofa
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Leon Paoa Sterling; Crew: "Snake" Ah Hee, Dr. Pat Aiu, Carlos Andrade, Chad Baybayan, Philip Ikeda, John Keolanui, "Kimo" Lyman, Mau Piailug, Scott Sullivan, Michael Tongg, Sione Uaine Ula (Tonga)
1986 Crew to Pago Pago
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: Leon Paoa Sterling; Crew: Dr. Pat Aiu, Carlos Andrade, Gilbert Ane, Gail Evenari (California), Chad Baybayan, Hector Busby (New Zealand), Philip Ikeda, Sam Kaai, John Keolanui, "Kimo" Lyman, Mau Piailug, Scott Sullivan, Jo Anne Sterling, Sione Taupeamuhu (Tonga), Michael Tongg, Sione Uaine Ula (Tonga)
1986 Crew to Aitutaki
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: "Shorty" Bertelmann; Crew: Clay Bertelmann, Harry Ho, Pauahi Ioane, Bernard Kilonsky, Ben Lindsey, Mel Paoa, Mau Piailug, Tua Pittman (Cook Islands), "Tava" Taupu (Marquesas)

1986 Crew to Rarotonga
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Crew: Dr. Pat Aiu, Chad Baybayan, Dede Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, "Wally" Froseith, Pauahi Ioane, "Jerry" Muller, Mau Piailug, Tua Pittman (Rarotonga), Reo Tuiravakai (Aitutaki), Raukete Tuiravakai (Aitutaki)

1986 Crew to Tautira
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Crew: "Snake" Ah Hee, Dr. Pat Aiu, Chad Baybayan, Bruce Blankenfeld, Wallace "Wally" Froiseth, Harry Ho, Glen Oshiro, Mau Piailug, Richard Rhodes, Michael Tongg, Aaron Young

1987 Crew to Papeete and return
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Crew: U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka, Chad Baybayan; "Wally" Froiseth, Harry Ho, Kilo Kaina, Michele Kapana, Will Kyselka, Russell Mau, Honolulu City Councilman Arnold Morgado; Abraham Piianaia, Tutaha Salmon (Tahiti), Cary Sneider (California), "Tava" Taupu (Marquesas), Michael Tongg, Aaron Young. Senator Akaka and Councilman Morgado joined the crew in Papeete.

1987 Crew to Rangiroa
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Crew; Chad Baybayan, Clay Bertelmann, "Wally" Froiseth, Rey Jonsson, Solomon Kahoohalahala, Will Kyselka, Charles Larson, Mel Paoa, Cary Sneider (California), "Tava" Taupu, Michael Tongg, Clifford Watson, Dr. Nathan Wong, Elisa Yadao, Aaron Young

1987 Crew to Hawaii
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Captain: "Shorty" Bertelmann; Crew: "Snake" Ah Hee, Dr. Pat Aiu, Chad Baybayan, Bruce Blankenfeld, Stanley Conrad (New Zealand), Eni Hunkin (Samoa), Tua Pittman (Cook Islands), Dixon Stroup, Puaniho Tauotaha (Tahiti), Sione Taupeamuhu (Tonga), "Tava" Taupu (Marquesas), Michael Tongg, Clifford Watson, Elisa Yadao

1992 No Nā Mamo

Hōkūle‘a sailed to Tahiti, Raiatea, and on to Rarotonga for the Sixth Festival of Pacific Arts, then, via Tahiti, sailed back to Hawaii. This voyage, known as "No Nā Mamo," or "For the Children," was designed to train a new generation of voyagers to sail Hōkūle‘a, to share values and knowledge of voyaging, and to celebrate the revival of canoe building and non-instrument navigation. The voyage included an educational component where Hawaiian students could track the progress of the canoe through daily radio reports. Kama Hele escorted the voyage.

Legs of No Nā Mamo

1992 Crew to Tahiti
Crew: Nainoa Thompson, Sailing master; Chad Baybayan, Co-navigator; "Shorty" Bertelmann, Co-navigator; Clay Bertelmann, Captain; Nailima Ahuna, Fisherman; Dennis J. Chun, Historian; Maulili Dixon, Cook; Kainoa Lee; Liloa Long; Jay Pailiki; Chadd Kaonohi Paishon; Ben Tamura, M.D.; "Tava" Taupu

1992 Crew to Raiatea
Crew: Nainoa Thompson, Sailing master; Chad Baybayan, Navigator; Keahi Omai, Navigator; "Billy" Richards, Captain; Gilbert Ane; John Eddy, Film Documentation; Clement "Tiger" Espere*; Brickwood Galuteria, Communications; Harry Ho; Sol Kahoohalahala; Dennis Kawaharada, Communications; Reggie Keaunui; Keone Nunes, Oral Historian; Eric Martinson; Nalani Minton, Traditional Medicine; Esther Mookini, Hawaiian Language; Mel Paoa; Cliff Watson, Film Documentation; Nathan Wong, M.D.

1992 Crew to Rarotonga
Crew: Nainoa Thompson, Sailing master; Chad Baybayan, Navigator; Gordon Piianaia, Captain; Moana Doi, Photo Documentation; John Eddy, Film Documentation; Ben Finney, Scholar; "Wally" Froseith, Watch Captain; Brickwood Galuteria, Communications; Harry Ho; Kaau McKenney; Keahi Omai; Keone Nunes, Oral Historian; "Billy" Richards, Watch Captain; Cliff Watson, Film Documentation Cook Islands Additional Crew: Clive Baxter (Aitutaki); Tura Koronui (Atiu); Dorn Marsters (Aitutaki); Tua Pittman (Rarotonga); Nga Pouao (Mitiaro); Maara Tearaua (Mangaia); Peia Tuaati (Mauke)

1992 Crew to Hawaii
Co-navigators: Bruce Blankenfeld, "Kimo" Lyman; Captain: Michael Tongg; Sailing Master: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captain and Cook: "Snake" Ah Hee; Watch Captain: Aaron Young; Ship's Doctor: Pat Aiu, M.D; Historian: Carlos Andrade; Fisherman: Terry Hee; Communications: Scott Sullivan; Crew: Archie Kalepa, Suzette Smith, Wallace Wong, Gary Yuen

1995 Nā Ohana Holo Moana

1995 Spring voyage segment

In the spring, Hōkūle‘a, along with sister ships Hawai‘iloa and Makali‘i, sailed from Hawaii to Tahiti. They participated in a gathering of voyaging canoes from across Oceania at nearby Marae Taputapuatea, Raiatea, which led to the lifting of a six-centuries-old tapu on voyaging from Raiatea, then all the canoes returned to Tahiti, sailed to Nuku Hiva in the Marquesas, then on to Hawaii. This was only the first part of a voyage spanning spring and summer known as "Nā Ohana Holo Moana," or The Voyaging Families of the Vast Ocean. Hōkūle‘a was escorted by Gershon II under Steve Kornberg; Rizaldar, under Randy Wichman, also escorted.

Legs of Nā Ohana Holo Moana, spring

1995 Crew to Tahiti
Sailing Master: Nainoa Thompson; Navigators: Kaau McKenney, Keahi Omai; Crew: Shantell Ching, Junior Coleman, Catherine Fuller, Harry Ho, Mau Piailug, Sesario Sewralur (son of Mau Piailug), Ben Tamura, MD; "Tava" Taupu, Michael Tongg, Kamaki Worthington. After Hōkūle‘a sighted Tikehau on 2 March 1995, Navigators Kaau McKenney and Keahi Omai turned over navigation to their apprentices, Junior Coleman and Sesario Sewralur, who guided the vessel to landfall in Papeete, Tahiti.

1995 Crew to Tautira
This crew may be the same as on the previous leg, but this is speculation.

1995 Crew to Nuku Hiva
Navigator and Captain: Chad Baybayan;

1995 Crew to Hawaii
Navigator and Captain: Chad Baybayan; Co-assistant navigators: Moana Doi, Piikea Miller; Watch Captains: "Snake" Ah Hee, "Tava" Taupu, Michael Tongg; Medical Officer: Mel Paoa; Fisherman and Teacher: Nainoa Thompson; Cook: Gary Yuen; Crew: Clyde Aikau, Sam Pautu, Mau Piailug, Sesario Sewralur, Gary Suzuki

1995 Summer voyage segment

In the summer: Hōkūle‘a and Hawai‘iloa sailed the West Coast of the United States. Both vessels were shipped from Hawaii to Seattle, Washington, after which they sailed to Vancouver, British Columbia. They visited intermediate ports, often where local American Indian tribes hosted them to a dinner and gift exchange. From Vancouver, Hawai‘iloa sailed as far north as Haines, Alaska. Hōkūle‘a sailed south to San Diego via Portland, Oregon, and the California ports of San Francisco, Santa Barbara, and Long Beach. The voyaging canoes were shipped back to Hawaii: Hōkūle‘a from San Pedro; Hawai‘iloa from Seattle. This summer part of the voyage promoted cultural and educational exchanges with Hawaiians (some of whom had never been to Hawaii), Native Americans, and other people living on the United States West Coast.

Legs of Nā Ohana Holo Moana, summer







1995 Crew to San Pedro
Captains: Gordon Piianaia, "Kimo" Lyman, Michael Tongg, Chad Baybayan; Crew: Moana Doi

1999 - 2000 Closing the Triangle

Hōkūle‘a sailed from Hawaii to Rapa Nui (Easter Island) and back, via the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia. While in the Marquesas, short trips were made between principal islands of the group (Karta FP Marquesa isl.PNG). A brief stop was made at Pitcairn Island on the Mangareva – Rapa Nui leg. A technically challenging voyage due to Rapa Nui's isolation and location 900 miles upwind; it is known as "Closing the Triangle" because it takes the canoe to the southeastern Pacific for the first time. Kama Hele escorted the voyage.

Legs of Closing the Triangle

1999 Crew to Nuku Hiva
Navigator and Captain: Bruce Blankenfeld; Apprentice Navigator: Piikea Miller; Watch Captains: Dennis Chun, Terry Hee, Leon Paoa Sterling; Crew: Russell Amimoto, Desmon Antone, Darcy Attisani, Kekama Helm, Kaau McKenney, Atwood Makanani, Hauoli Smith, Wallace Wong
1999 Crew to Mangareva
Navigator and Captain: Chad Baybayan; Apprentice Navigators: Moana Doi, Catherine Fuller; Student Navigator: Aldon Kim; Watch Captains: Terry Hee, Mel Paoa, "Tava" Taupu; Protocol Officer: Kaniela Akaka; Crew: Tim Gilliom, Kealoha Hoe, Aeronwy Polo, Mona Shintani, Gary Suzuki, Nalani Wilson, Gary Yuen

1999 Crew to Rapa Nui
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Navigtors: Bruce Blankenfeld, Chad Baybayan; Medical Officer: Ben Tamura, MD; Photographer and Videographer: Sonny Ahuna; Crew: Shantell Ching, Terry Hee, Mel Paoa, "Tava" Taupu, Michael Tongg, Max Yarawamai, Aaron Young

1999 Crew to Tahiti
Navigator: Bruce Blankenfeld; Captain: "Wally" Froiseth; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Bob Bee, Blane Chong, Dennis Chun, Terry Hee, Nalani Kaneakua, Kawika Crivello, Kealoha Hoe, "Kimo" Lyman, Kawai Warren, Kamaki Worthington

2000 Crew to Hawaii
Navigator: Nainoa Thompson; Navigator: Shantell Ching; Crew: "Snake" Ah Hee, Chad Baybayan, Pomaikalani "Pomai" Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, Sam Low, Joey Mallot, Kahualaulani Mick, Kaiulani Murphy, Kaui Pelekane, "Tava" Taupu, Michael Tongg, Dr. Patrice Ming-Lei Tim Sing, Kona Woolsey

2003 - 2004 Navigating Change project

In 2003, Hōkūle‘a sailed to Nihoa, the closest of the "Leeward," or Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (maps: Hawaiianislandchain USGS.png and NHINM.png scale), to set the stage for the 2004 voyage to the furthest, most westerly of them, Kure Atoll. Hōkūle‘a's 2004 voyage, led by Nainoa Thompson, took the canoe through this area now known as the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to promote stewardship and awareness of this pristine area. Hōkūle‘a participated in an interagency initiative with this voyage named after it, called "Navigating Change. Upon reaching the remote islands, the crew helped haul away hundreds of pounds of washed-up fishing nets which threatened Hawaiian monk seals and Hawaiian Green sea turtles and also helped with plant conservation. About 1,600 schoolchildren were linked to the vessel by daily satellite phone calls for which teachers prepared with curriculum guides, video and web resources. Kama Hele escorted the voyage.

2003 Legs of Navigating Change

2003 Crew to Kauai
Captain: Bruce Blankenfeld; Crew: Carey Amimoto, Anela Benson, Leimomi Dierks, Timmy Gilliom, Kiki Hugho, Nohea Kaiaokamalie, Jerry Muller, Dean Nikaido, Mel Paoa, Ronson Sahut, Jan TenBruggencate, Boyd Yap

2003 Crew to Nihoa
Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Crew: Russell Amimoto, Naalehu Anthony, Bruce Blankenfeld, Nohea Kaiaokamalie, Cindy Macfarlane, Mel Paoa, Jan TenBruggencate, Kana Uchino, Alex Wegman, Aulani Wilhelm

2004 Legs of Navigating Change

2004 Crew to Kauai, outbound leg
Navigator: Kaiulani Murphy; Captain: Russell Amimoto; Crew: Jan TenBruggencate,

  • Hanalei Bay, Kauai – Nihoa Island – Tern Island, French Frigate Shoals – Laysan Island – Lisianski Island – Pearl and Hermes Atoll – Green Island, Kure Atoll – Midway Atoll: 23 May 2004 to 9 June 2004

2004 Crew to Midway
Navigator: Kaiulani Murphy; Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Sailing Master: Bruce Blankenfeld; Watch Captain: Russell Amimoto; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Ann Bell; Leimomi Kekina Dierks, Randy Kosaki, Keoni Kuoha, Cherie Shehata, MD, "Tava" Taupu, Jan TenBruggencate, Kanako Uchino, Kaleo Wong

2004 Crew to Kauai, return leg
Navigator: Bruce Blankenfeld; Captain: Mel Paoa; Terry Hee, Kealoha Hoe, Nohea Kaiaokamalie, Keoni Kuoha, Kaiulani Murphy, "Tava" Taupu, Mike Taylor, Gary Yuen

2004 Crew to Honolulu
Captain: Russell Amimoto; Gerald Aikau

2007 One Ocean, One People

The "One Ocean, One People" theme united two voyages in celebration of Pacific voyaging, Pacific Islands, and cultural ties, in passages to Micronesia and Japan. These voyages were named "Kū Holo Mau" and "Kū Holo Lā Komohana". Kama Hele escorted the voyage.

Kū Holo Mau

Accompanied by the canoe Alingano Maisu and specialized escort boat Kama Hele, (photo below, in gallery) Hōkūle‘a sailed from Hawaii to the Federated States of Micronesia, 23 January to 7 April 2007. This voyage is known as "Kū Holo Mau," or "Sail On, Sail Always, Sail Forever." While on the island of Satawal, the crew of the Hōkūle‘a presented the Alingano Maisu to Mau Piailug as a gift for his role in helping to revive traditional wayfinding navigation in Hawaii. While at Satawal, some Hōkūle‘a navigators who had proven their mastery of non-instrument sailing and navigation over many ocean passages were inducted into Pwo, pronounced "poh." This was the first Pwo ceremony on Satawal in five decades, and the first time Polynesians were inducted.
Legs of Kū Holo Mau

2007 Crew to Majuro
Navigator and Captain: Bruce Blankenfeld; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Ben Tamura; Crew: Russell Amimoto, Bob Bee, Terry Hee, Nohea Kaiokamalie, Kaleo Wong, Palani Wright

2007 Crew to Pohnpei
Navigator and Captain: Bruce Blankenfeld; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Gerald Akaka; Crew: Russell Amimoto, Terry Hee, Nohea Kaiokamalie, Gary Kubota, Kaleo Wong, Palani Wright

2007 Crew to Chuuk
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Marjorie Mau; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Pomai Bertelmann, Gary Kubota, Keoni Kuoha, Nick Marr, "Billy" Richards, Ana Yarawamai, Max Yarawamai, Pauline Yourupi

2007 Crew to Satawal
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Marjorie Mau; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Chad Baybayan, "Shorty" Bertelmann, Pomai Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, "Snake" Ah Hee, John Kruse, Gary Kubota, Keoni Kuoha, Nick Marr, "Billy" Richards, Ana Yarawamai, Max Yarawamai, Pauline Yourupi

2007 Crew to Woleai
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Marjorie Mau; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Chad Baybayan, "Shorty" Bertelmann, Pomai Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, "Snake" Ah Hee, John Kruse, Gary Kubota, Keoni Kuoha, Nick Marr, "Billy" Richards, Ana Yarawamai, Max Yarawamai, Pauline Yourupi

2007 Crew to Ulithi
Navigator: Kaiulani Murphy; Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani; Medical Officer: Dr. Marjorie Mau; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Chad Baybayan, Pomai Bertelmann, Gary Kubota, Keoni Kuoha, Nick Marr, "Billy" Richards, Ana Yarawamai, Max Yarawamai, Pauline Yourupi

2007 Crew to Yap
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Marjorie Mau; Crew: Naalehu Anthony, Chad Baybayan, Pomai Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, Dr. Thane Hancock, "Snake" Ah Hee, John Kruse, Gary Kubota, Keoni Kuoha, Nick Marr, "Billy" Richards, Ana Yarawamai, Max Yarawamai, Pauline Yourupi

2007 Crew to Palau
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy; Medical Officer: Dr. Vernon Andsell; Crew: Aaron Akina, Naalehu Anthony, Pomai Bertelmann, Dennis Eric Co, Emily Fielding, Keoni Kuoha, Waimea McKeague, Tommy Remengesau (President of Palau), Pauline Sato, Patti Ann Solomon

2007 Crew, Return to Yap
Navigator: Kaiulani Murphy; Captain: Naalehu Anthony; Watch Captains: Tim Gilliom, Attwood Makanani, Nainoa Thompson; Medical Officer: Dr. Vernon Andsell; Crew: Aaron Akina, Pomai Bertelmann, Dennis Eric Co, Emily Fielding, Keoni Kuoha, Waimea McKeague, Pauline Sato, Patti Ann Solomon

Kū Holo Lā Komohana

From Yap, the Hōkūle‘a sailed to Yokohama, Japan, 11 April 2007 to 8 June 2007. Upon sighting Kyūshū, navigation of coastal and inland seas utilized landmarks and aids to navigation. From departure to landfall at Okinawa, Japan, Hōkūle‘a was guided by Nainoa Thompson. Chad Baybayan then guided the vessel to further stops at Amami, Uto, Nomozaki, Nagasaki, Fukuoka, Shinmoji marina in Moji-ku, Iwaishima, and Suō-Ōshima (Ōshima). Nainoa Thompson resumed as captain for stops at Miyajima and Hiroshima (Media:Hokuleahirohiro.JPG). Bruce Blankenfeld then took over for stops at Uwajima, Muroto, Miura, and Kamakura before concluding the voyage in Yokohama. This Canoe completes voyage from Hawaii to Japan is known as "Kū Holo Lā Komohana," or Sail On to the Western Sun. While Hōkūle‘a was shipped back to Honolulu, escort vessel Kama Hele sailed back to Oahu under German Captain Mike Weindl with six Japanese crewmembers.
Legs of Kū Holo Lā Komohana

2007 Crew to Okinawa
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Crew: Takuji Arai (Japan), Pomai Bertelmann, Timi Gilliom, Kaina Holomalia, Attwood Makanani, Kaiulani Murphy, Maile Neff, Chadd Kaonohi Paishon, Dr. Pete Roney, Kanaka Uchino (Japan)

2007 Crew to Ōshima
Captain: Chad Baybayan; Crew: Imaikalani P. Aiu, Takuji Araki, Kalepa "Kala" Baybayan, Stephanie M. Beeby, Anela K. Benson, Dennis J. Chun, Monte Costa, Derek Ferrar, Timmy Gilliom, Heidi K. Guth, Kaimi C. Hermosura, Kiyoko Ikeda, William Keala Kai, Attwood Makanani, Chadd Kaonohi Paishon, Makaala Rawlins, Dr. Cherie L. Shehata, Van K. Warren

2007 Crew to Uwajima
Navigator and Captain: Nainoa Thompson; Watch Captain: Kaiulani Murphy; Crew: Imaikalani P. Aiu, Takuji Araki, Nanea Baird, Stephanie M. Beeby, Anela K. Benson, Pomai Bertelmann, Dennis J. Chun, Monte Costa, Heidi K. Guth, Kaimi C. Hermosura, Kiyoko Ikeda, William Keala Kai, Attwood Makanani, Chadd Kaonohi Paishon, Dr. Cherie L. Shehata, Sky Takemoto, Kanako Uchino, Van K. Warren

2007 Crew to Yokohama
Navigator and Captain: Bruce Blankenfeld; Senior Officers: Norman Piianaia, "Tava" Taupu; Watch Captain: Naalehu Anthony; Crew: Takuji Araki, Chris Baird, Dennis Kawaharada, Attwood Makanani, Dr. Cherie L. Shehata, Patti-Ann Solomon; Watch Captain: Kaiulani Murphy; Crew: Pomai Bertelmann, Dean Nikaido, Chadd Kaonohi Paishon, Leighton Tseu (representing the Royal Order of Kamehameha), Kanako Uchino, Kiyotsugu Yoshida (Sunset Films)

Images

See also

References and Notes

References

*

  • a,

 |publisher=The Kamehameha Schools
 |pages=p. 5
 |language=en-US, portions in haw
 |accessdate=2008-08-28
}}

Search another word or see point departureon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;