Definitions

pink

pink

[pingk]
pink, common name for some members of the Caryophyllaceae, a family of small herbs found chiefly in north temperate zones (especially the Mediterranean area) but with several genera indigenous to south temperate zones and high altitudes of tropical mountains. Plants of this family typically have stems that are swollen at the nodes and notched, or "pinked," petals ranging in color from white to pink, red, and purple. The family includes several ornamentals and many wildflowers and weeds, many of them European species now widely naturalized elsewhere.

Ornamental Pinks

Ornamental pinks include the spicily fragrant flowers of the large genus Dianthus, an Old World group including the carnation (D. caryophyllus), sweet William (D. barbatus), Deptford pink (D. armeria), and most other flowers called dianthus or pink (some of the latter belong to other genera of the family). In over 2,000 years of cultivation (the name Dianthus was mentioned by Theophrastus c.300 B.C.) the carnation has given rise to about 2,000 varieties, all derived from the single-flowered, flesh-colored clove pink, known in Elizabethan times as gillyflower. Formerly added to wine and beer as a flavoring, it is now used in perfumery. The sweet William bears its blossoms in dense clusters; wild sweet William, an American wildflower, is an unrelated species of the phlox family. The most popular ornamental pinks—the maiden pink (D. deltoides) and especially varieties of the garden, or grass, pink (D. plumarius)—have escaped from cultivation and now grow wild in the United States. This is true also of other ornamentals, e.g., the ragged robin, or cuckoo flower (Lychnis flos-cuculi), the bouncing Bet (Saponaria officinalis), and the baby's breath (Gypsophila paniculata). The ragged robin was once known as crowflower; it was probably the crowflower used by Ophelia in her garland (Shakespeare's Hamlet). The bouncing Bet, cultivated in colonial America, is the best-known American soap plant; it is also called soapwort, as are other species of the genus. The baby's breath is an unusual member of the family in being a bushy plant; it is much used as a bouquet filler.

Wildflowers

Wildflowers of the family that have indigenous American species include the pearlworts (genus Sagina), sandworts (Arenaria), campions and catchflies (species of several genera, especially Lychnis and the widespread Silene), sand spurries (Spergularia), and chickweeds (species of several genera, e.g., Stellaria and Cerastium). Chickweed, relished by birds, is sometimes used for greens and for poultices; catchflies (e.g., Silene virginica of the E United States, also called fire pink) are named for the fringed teeth or claws of their deeply lobed petals. The common chickweed (Stellaria media), the moss campion (Silene acaulis), and the common spurry (Spergula arvensis) are now nearly cosmopolitan weeds, having spread from parts of the Old World. Spurry, cultivated in Europe as a pasture, hay, and cover crop, is sometimes planted to hold sand in place.

Classification

Pinks are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, family Caryophyllaceae.

Food fish (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, family Salmonidae) of the North Pacific that constitutes half of the commercial fishery of Pacific salmon. It weighs about 4.5 lbs (2 kg) and is marked with large, irregular spots. Pink salmon often spawn on tidal flats. The young enter the sea immediately after hatching.

Learn more about pink salmon with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Herbaceous plant (Dianthus caryophyllus) of the pink family, native to the Mediterranean, widely cultivated for its fringe-petaled, often spicy-smelling flowers. Border, or garden, carnations include a range of varieties and hybrids. The perpetual flowering carnation, taller and stouter, produces larger flowers and blooms almost continuously in the greenhouse; miniature (baby) and spray varieties are also grown for the florist trade. Carnations are among the most popular cut flowers, used in floral arrangements, corsages, and boutonnieres.

Learn more about carnation with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Pink is a town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The population was 1,165 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Pink is located at (35.232145, -97.107072).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 26.0 square miles (67.2 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,165 people, 430 households, and 338 families residing in the town. The population density was 44.9 people per square mile (17.3/km²). There were 466 housing units at an average density of 18.0/sq mi (6.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 83.09% White, 0.77% African American, 8.67% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.26% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 6.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.09% of the population.

There were 430 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.2% were non-families. 17.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the town the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 26.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 105.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $35,195, and the median income for a family was $37,857. Males had a median income of $29,306 versus $20,952 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,925. About 10.0% of families and 11.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.3% of those under age 18 and 11.9% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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