Piet

Piet

[pahy-it]
Mondrian, Piet, 1872-1944, Dutch painter. He studied at the academy in Amsterdam and passed through an early naturalistic phase. In 1910 he went to Paris, where the influence of cubism stimulated the development of his geometric, nonobjective style, which he called neoplasticism. He and Theo van Doesburg—leaders of the so-called Stijl group of artists—founded (1917) a magazine De Stijl, in which Mondrian published articles until 1925. In 1920 he published a book on his theory that appeared as Le Neo-Plasticisme in French and as Neue Gestaltung in German. His art and theory influenced the Bauhaus movement and the development of the International style in architecture. In 1940 he settled in New York City.

Typical of his art are compositions employing only vertical and horizontal lines at 90° angles and using only the primary colors and sometimes grays or black against a white background. Sensuality, three-dimensionality, and representation are utterly eliminated from his works, as is the curved line. Within these restrictions, his paintings are executed with consummate perfection of design and craft. Much of Mondrian's work is in American and European private collections. He is well represented in the Museum of Modern Art, New York City, and in the Art Institute of Chicago.

Bibliography

See his essays (1945); studies by M. Seuphor (tr. 1957), F. Elgar (tr. 1968), H. L. C. Jaffé (1970), and C. Blotkamp (1995).

orig. Pieter Cornelis Mondriaan

(born March 7, 1872, Amersfoort, Neth.—died Feb. 1, 1944, New York, N.Y., U.S.) Dutch painter. At the insistence of his father, headmaster of a Calvinist school, he obtained an education degree, but then immediately began taking painting lessons. His first paintings were exhibited in 1893; his early work reflected the influence of avant-garde trends such as Post-Impressionism and Cubism. In 1917 Mondrian and three other painters founded the art periodical and the movement known as De Stijl. The group advocated a style called “neoplasticism,” which entailed complete rejection of visually perceived reality as subject matter and the restriction of a pictorial language to its most basic elements of the straight line, primary colours, and the neutrals of black, white, and gray. He painted in this style for the next 20 years, until he fled war-torn Paris for London and then New York City in 1940. Inspired by the city's pulsating life and the new rhythms of musical forms such as jazz, he replaced his austere patterns with a series of small squares and rectangles that coalesced into a flow of colourful vertical and horizontal lines. His late masterpieces (e.g., Broadway Boogie-Woogie, 1942–43) express this new vivacity. The consistent development of Mondrian's art toward complete abstraction was an outstanding feat in the history of modern art, and his work foreshadowed the rise of abstract art in the 1940s and '50s.

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orig. Pieter Cornelis Mondriaan

(born March 7, 1872, Amersfoort, Neth.—died Feb. 1, 1944, New York, N.Y., U.S.) Dutch painter. At the insistence of his father, headmaster of a Calvinist school, he obtained an education degree, but then immediately began taking painting lessons. His first paintings were exhibited in 1893; his early work reflected the influence of avant-garde trends such as Post-Impressionism and Cubism. In 1917 Mondrian and three other painters founded the art periodical and the movement known as De Stijl. The group advocated a style called “neoplasticism,” which entailed complete rejection of visually perceived reality as subject matter and the restriction of a pictorial language to its most basic elements of the straight line, primary colours, and the neutrals of black, white, and gray. He painted in this style for the next 20 years, until he fled war-torn Paris for London and then New York City in 1940. Inspired by the city's pulsating life and the new rhythms of musical forms such as jazz, he replaced his austere patterns with a series of small squares and rectangles that coalesced into a flow of colourful vertical and horizontal lines. His late masterpieces (e.g., Broadway Boogie-Woogie, 1942–43) express this new vivacity. The consistent development of Mondrian's art toward complete abstraction was an outstanding feat in the history of modern art, and his work foreshadowed the rise of abstract art in the 1940s and '50s.

Learn more about Mondrian, Piet with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Piet-Hein Willem Geeris (born March 29, 1972 in Boxtel, Noord-Brabant) is a former Dutch field hockey player, who played 194 international matches for The Netherlands, in which he scored 29 goals. The forward and midfielder made his debut for the Dutch on May 5, 1993 in a friendly match against Ireland. His last appearance in the Holland squad came just before the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens.

Geeris played in the Dutch League for MEP, HC Tilburg, HC Den Bosch and Oranje Zwart. In between he also went to Italy, and played for Cernusco. He stopped competing at top level in the spring of 2004, and then continued playing in Belgium.

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