partridge

partridge

[pahr-trij]
partridge, common name applied to various henlike birds of several families. The true partridges of the Old World are members of the pheasant family (Phasianidae); the common European or Hungarian species has been successfully introduced in parts of North America. In some areas of the United States the name partridge is applied to the ruffed grouse, the bobwhite, and the plumed quail; in Europe the South American tinamou is called a partridge. The gray partridge, Perdix perdix, is an Old World bird of about 1 to 11/2 ft (30-45 cm). True partridges are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Galliformes, family Phasianidae.
Partridge, Sir Bernard, 1861-1945, English caricaturist and illustrator. He was principal cartoonist for Punch from 1891 until his death. Partridge began his career by designing stained glass and painting watercolors, but he is best known as an illustrator.
Partridge, Eric Honeybrook, 1894-1979, British lexicographer; b. New Zealand. He studied in Australia and at Oxford, taught briefly in England, and founded a small publishing company. For 50 years he devoted himself to the study of English and its correct usage, compiling 16 lexicons on such subjects as slang, clichés, catch phrases, and etymology. His works were acclaimed for their scholarship.

Partridges are birds in the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are a non-migratory Old World group.

These are medium-sized birds intermediate between the larger pheasants and the smaller quails. The Partridges are native to Europe, Asia, North Africa, and the Middle East. The partridges are ground-nesting seed-eaters.

Species list in taxonomic order

External links

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