Muddy

Muddy

[muhd-ee]
Waters, Muddy, 1915-83, African-American blues singer and guitarist, b. Rolling Fork, Miss., as McKinley Morganfield. As a teenager he began singing and playing traditional country blues on harmonica and guitar, and in 1941 he was recorded by Alan Lomax for the Library of Congress. Two years later he settled in Chicago, where he switched from Delta blues to a more sophisticated urban rhythm and blues, using an electric guitar backed by other amplified instruments. He soon became known for his driving slide guitar technique and darkly expressive vocal style. From the 1950s on Waters recorded, toured, and played various music festivals. His electric blues influenced such American musicians as Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan and such British rockers as the Rolling Stones, who took their name from a Waters song, and Eric Clapton, who recorded with him.

See J. Rooney, Bossmen: Bill Monroe and Muddy Waters (1991); S. B. Tooze, Muddy Waters (1997); R. Gordon, Can't Be Satisfied (2002).

orig. McKinley Morganfield

(born April 4, 1915, Rolling Fork, Miss., U.S.—died April 30, 1983, Westmont, Ill.) U.S. blues guitarist and singer. He grew up in the cotton country of Mississippi and taught himself harmonica as a child. He later took up guitar, eagerly absorbing the classic delta blues styles of Robert Johnson and Son House. He was first recorded in 1941 by archivist Alan Lomax (see John Lomax). In 1943 he moved to Chicago; there he broke with the country blues style by playing over a heavy dance rhythm, adopting the electric guitar and adding piano and drums while retaining a moan-and-shout vocal style and lyrics that were by turns mournful, boastful, and risqué. The result came to be known as urban blues, from which sprang in large part later forms such as rock music and soul music. A surge in interest in the roots of popular music in the early 1960s brought Waters widespread fame, and he performed internationally into the 1970s.

Learn more about Waters, Muddy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. McKinley Morganfield

(born April 4, 1915, Rolling Fork, Miss., U.S.—died April 30, 1983, Westmont, Ill.) U.S. blues guitarist and singer. He grew up in the cotton country of Mississippi and taught himself harmonica as a child. He later took up guitar, eagerly absorbing the classic delta blues styles of Robert Johnson and Son House. He was first recorded in 1941 by archivist Alan Lomax (see John Lomax). In 1943 he moved to Chicago; there he broke with the country blues style by playing over a heavy dance rhythm, adopting the electric guitar and adding piano and drums while retaining a moan-and-shout vocal style and lyrics that were by turns mournful, boastful, and risqué. The result came to be known as urban blues, from which sprang in large part later forms such as rock music and soul music. A surge in interest in the roots of popular music in the early 1960s brought Waters widespread fame, and he performed internationally into the 1970s.

Learn more about Waters, Muddy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Muddy is a village in Saline County, Illinois, United States. The population was 78 at the 2000 census. Muddy, until 2002, held the smallest post office in the United States. In 2002, a larger building adjacent from the former post office was constructed to better serve its citizens. The old post office remains, and the sign now reads OLD MUDDY POST OFFICE.

Geography

Muddy is located at (37.764086, -88.514469).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.7 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 78 people, 34 households, and 21 families residing in the village. The population density was 296.9 people per square mile (115.8/km²). There were 39 housing units at an average density of 148.5/sq mi (57.9/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 88.46% White, 5.13% African American, 2.56% Native American, 3.85% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.85% of the population.

There were 34 households out of which 38.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.2% were non-families. 38.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the village the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 17.9% from 18 to 24, 17.9% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 110.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $24,375, and the median income for a family was $28,750. Males had a median income of $28,750 versus $28,250 for females. The per capita income for the village was $13,384. There were no families and 7.7% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64.

References

External links

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