Mosby

Mosby

[mohz-bee]
Mosby, John Singleton, 1833-1916, Confederate partisan leader in the American Civil War, b. Edgemont, Va. He was practicing law in Bristol, Va., when the Civil War broke out. Mosby served brilliantly in the cavalry under J. E. B. Stuart until Jan., 1863, when he began his partisan operations in N Virginia—soon called "Mosby's Confederacy." Moving swiftly and secretly, Mosby's men (who never numbered more than 200) continually routed Union cavalry, destroyed communications, appropriated supplies, and were, in general, a great nuisance to the Army of the Potomac. Perhaps Mosby's most famous exploit was the capture of a Union general, caught asleep in his bed, at Fairfax Courthouse in Mar., 1863. Protected by the people of the region, Mosby's partisan rangers eluded the strong forces sent to capture them and were active until Robert E. Lee surrendered. Mosby secured his parole only through the intercession of Ulysses S. Grant, of whom he became a great admirer. He joined the Republican party and later held various minor government positions. He wrote Mosby's War Reminiscences and Stuart's Cavalry Campaigns (1887) and Stuart's Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign (1908).

See C. W. Russell, ed., The Memoirs of Colonel John S. Mosby (1917, repr. 1969); biographies by V. C. Jones (1944), J. Daniels (1959), K. Seipel (1983), and J. A. Ramage (1999).

(born Dec. 6, 1833, Edgemont, Va., U.S.—died May 30, 1916, Washington, D.C.) U.S. guerrilla leader. He joined the Confederate cavalry in the American Civil War and was a scout with Jeb Stuart's troops. He led guerrilla units, called Mosby's Rangers, on raids on Union outposts in northern Virginia and Maryland, disrupting supply and communication lines. His capture of a Union general and 100 of his men behind federal lines (1863) earned him promotion to colonel. After the war he resumed his law practice, and he later served as U.S. consul to Hong Kong (1878–85) and as assistant attorney in the U.S. Justice Department (1904–10).

Learn more about Mosby, John Singleton with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Dec. 6, 1833, Edgemont, Va., U.S.—died May 30, 1916, Washington, D.C.) U.S. guerrilla leader. He joined the Confederate cavalry in the American Civil War and was a scout with Jeb Stuart's troops. He led guerrilla units, called Mosby's Rangers, on raids on Union outposts in northern Virginia and Maryland, disrupting supply and communication lines. His capture of a Union general and 100 of his men behind federal lines (1863) earned him promotion to colonel. After the war he resumed his law practice, and he later served as U.S. consul to Hong Kong (1878–85) and as assistant attorney in the U.S. Justice Department (1904–10).

Learn more about Mosby, John Singleton with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Mosby is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States, along the Fishing River. The population was 242 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Mosby is located at (39.314190, -94.303369).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.5 square miles (4.0 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 242 people, 79 households, and 57 families residing in the city. The population density was 157.3 people per square mile (60.7/km²). There were 94 housing units at an average density of 61.1/sq mi (23.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.32% White, 0.41% Native American, 2.07% Asian, 1.65% from other races, and 4.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.65% of the population.

There were 79 households out of which 44.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.4% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.06 and the average family size was 3.54.

In the city the population was spread out with 36.8% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 14.0% from 45 to 64, and 6.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females there were 128.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,333, and the median income for a family was $33,250. Males had a median income of $30,263 versus $14,688 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,617. About 20.0% of families and 18.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.2% of those under the age of eighteen and none of those sixty five or over.

References

External links

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