mood

mood

[mood]
mood or mode, in verb inflection, the forms of a verb that indicate its manner of doing or being. In English the forms are called indicative (for direct statement or question or to express an uncertain condition, e.g., If they do not send it, we cannot go), imperative (for commands), and subjunctive (for sentences suggesting doubt, condition, or a situation contrary to fact, e.g., If I were king … , or He asked that it be done). The infinitive (nonpersonal, generalizing) is sometimes considered an example of mood, as are phrases formed with the auxiliaries may, might, can, and could (termed the potential mood); should and would (conditional); and must and ought (obligative). These names of moods are often used for similar categories in other languages, and many languages are far richer in analogous patterns than Romance languages; moods commonly found in other languages are narrative, quotative, mythical, desiderative, optative, and negative. In standard English the verb to be has special modal inflections.
or mode

In grammar, a category that reflects the speaker's view of an event's reality, likelihood, or urgency. Often marked by special verb forms (inflections), moods include the indicative, for factual or neutral situations (e.g., “You did your work”); the imperative, to convey commands or requests (“Do your work”); and the subjunctive. The subjunctive's functions vary widely. It may express doubt, possibility, necessity, desire, or future time. In English it often indicates a condition contrary to fact (e.g., “If he were to work here, he would have to learn to be punctual”).

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In psychology, symptoms are said to be mood-congruent if they are consistent with a patient's mood or mental disorder. Conversely, they are said to be mood-incongruent if they are inconsistent with their primary mood.

For example, suicide ideation in a patient suffering from Major Depressive Disorder would be a mood-congruent symptom. Likewise, feelings of omnipotence or other delusions of grandeur would be considered mood-incongruent symptoms in the case of depression, while they would be mood-congruent in a person experiencing mania.

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